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Thread: Any ideas to heavy up a 375?

  1. #1
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default Any ideas to heavy up a 375?

    purchased a Remington 700 375 H&H
    Gun is very light...was wondering if anyone has one and how they have made mods to help with recoil?

    Mercury reducer? Weights in stock???
    Psalm 18:34
    He trains my hands for war, so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

  2. #2

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    Not a 700, but I had my Ruger #1 375 magnaported and a mercury reducer installed in the stock. It made such a difference that it's almost spooky. You can actually see bullet impact through the scope. Try that with any other 375!

    We took it out along with an unaltered #1 in 30-06, and if anything the 06 seemed to recoil more. You certainly couldn't see bullet impact through the scope.

    If you simply want to add weight, here's how a friend did it on his 700:

    He routed out a deep groove in the barrel channel of the forend almost as wide as the barrel, filled the new space with #8 lead shot and poured Acraglas over it. He wrapped the barrel in two layers of masking tape and added release agent, then screwed the barreled action back into the stock. Once the resin set, he removed the tape for a free-floated barrel along with an extra pound of weight. The mod is completely invisible with the gun assembled. Best of all, the weight in the forend really improved the offhand shooting qualities and noticeably reduced barrel jump.

  3. #3
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    At one time I took a 3/4" copper pipe about 6" long and filled it with lead. then cut a piece of oak that just fit the butt stock profile (this took some sanding/fitting) Drilled a 3/4" hole in the oak and mounted the pipe using a bolt and set this into the butt stock. After replacing the recoip pad, it is unseen. You can also use some of the spray foam inside the butt to quiet things up. This added nearly a pound; not sure I would do it again though. I have never tried the mercury recoil reducer.

    I have tried muzzel brake but my ears just can't take the noise, even with plug and muffs. Don't have much hearing left and want to keep all I have.

    Using a laminate stock or another after marked stock maybe a better choice. Good luck. J.

  4. #4

    Talking Brownbear

    Sounds like you have a great shooting rifle now. I have an 8mm-338 mag that has a straight stock and I have seen the bullet hit and the reaction on every animal I've taken with it. I agree with the weight forward concept on rifles, ie., heavier barrels, mecury reducers and added weight like you did. It seems to me that the rifle is more maneageable with a heavier front, and that it doesn't have the tendency (more forgiving) when the trigger's pulled. It allows one to shoot quicker, instead of tallying around, dinking with a moving sight picture and trying to coodinate everything so one can mash the trigger. (Did this make sense?)Take care, ciao.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  5. #5

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    Makes perfect sense Maydog. A muzzleheavy balance can have a tremendous effect on offhand shooting, just as you describe. That's why I vastly prefer traditional muzzleloaders to inlines, in spite of the advantages of inlines. With open sights required on AK primitive weapon hunts most game shots are at offhand ranges, so there's no advantage to the flatter trajectory and long range abilities of the inlines. But there is a huge offhand accuracy advantage for the muzzleheavy traditional muzzleloaders. After shooting those a bunch, almost any CF rifle I pick up feels "whippy" in the front when I shoot offhand.

    Okay, enough excuses. In spite of a rack (and a garage and a shop) full of modern rifles, I'm really hooked on traditional muzzleloaders.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Anchorage View Post
    purchased a Remington 700 375 H&H
    Gun is very light...was wondering if anyone has one and how they have made mods to help with recoil?

    Mercury reducer? Weights in stock???
    The only time I've wanted a gun to be heavier was on the range. I can alleviate the recoil by wearing a recoil pad and placing weight bags on my shoulder while shooting. When hunting? I've never felt recoil when shooting at an animal and have never shot enough rounds to worry about it. When I'm in the field...lighter is better, every time.

  7. #7
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    I'm with Mr. Pid on this. If I have to haul it around I want lighter. Bench recoil can be abated in many ways without screwing up the balance of a rifle. I'm wondering did you not know this was a light rifle before you bought it? If you want a heavier 375 there are lots of them out there. A CZ is almost 10 pounds but it balances with just a bit of front heft, not a bad thing.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  8. #8

    Default Yup

    I'm with you on the carry versus shooting. I've got a 700 LH that started life as a 7mag I think, but the previous owner had a 375 barrel installed along with a barrel lug while retaining the outside barrel diamter in order not to have to rechannel the stock. With a scope and full mag it weighs just over 7 pounds. It's a delight to carry, but will beat you to a fairtheewell at the bench. Every time I shoot it I think about more weight or recoil reduction, but it's so easy to carry. Not bad offhand, but you definitely know you did something when you pull the trigger.

    I guess the final test is what I pack all the time. The 700 is beat up bad, while my 10-pound LH Mauser 3000 in 375 looks NIB, even though it's ten years older.

  9. #9

    Wink logical logic

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    The only time I've wanted a gun to be heavier was on the range. I can alleviate the recoil by wearing a recoil pad and placing weight bags on my shoulder while shooting. When hunting? I've never felt recoil when shooting at an animal and have never shot enough rounds to worry about it. When I'm in the field...lighter is better, every time.
    I can't come up with a valid argument with your statement Mr. Pid because it's 100% logical, no if, and's or but's about it. I can only come up with my personal requirements. A weight forward rifle need not be heavy (I personally prefer 8-9lbs). And someday this may change, but I've always personally felt that if I can't comfortably pack a 8-9lb rifle in the mountains, then I probably don't belong there, because I wouldn't be able to pack out an animal, if I'm that far out of shape. As I said, this is just my own personal "snake to kill,"and no reflection on anyone else's deal.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  10. #10
    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    Limbsaver R3 recoil pad.... nuff said!

    - Clint

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