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Thread: when to use salt

  1. #21
    Member Steven_JR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliW View Post
    Hi Steven

    Hopefully you received the video I sent you - if not please pm me... It was mailed last week. It is pretty in depth and covers most of your questions.
    Hi Juli - Yes, I did get the video and I agree, it covered many of my questions and others that I didn't know to ask yet. I posted my questions on here before having a chance to watch the video. As you can tell I'm trying to get as many answers, opinions, and information as I can in hopes of doing it right the first time!

    Thanks to all who have provided information!
    -Steven

  2. #22
    Member FullCryHounds's Avatar
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    If you salt a hide after it's been fleshed, never put it in the freezer! The whole point of salting it is that the salt will remove all moisture from the hide eventually making the hide dry and hard. At this point, there is no moisture left to create any bacteria growth so there is zero reason to put it in the freezer. If you do put a salted hide in a freezer before all the moisture has been removed, you can cause continued bacteria growth and ruin your hide.

  3. #23

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    That's just not true from my experience, FullCry. There may be no benefit to freezing a salted hide, but there is a valid reason to HAVE to freeze your hide while, say partially salted and partly unfinished, until the job is finished. In that case, no harm will come of the salted hide being frozen (albeit not beneficial to the salted part but a great benefit to the unsalted part).

    I think the part of the equation we're not tracking together is there are occasions where a hunter needs to put a hide in the freezer to "stall" his or her timing of getting the face details fleshed out. In this case, many hunters get the main cape fleshed and salted but haven't detailed the critical facial areas...so they have a salted hide with a face that needs to be fleshed NOW or freeze NOW and do LATER.

    I agree with you that all the cape or hide should be fully fleshed before salting, but in reality hunters usually get some of it done in the field and needs to fit it in after gear recovery back home before it goes to the Taxi...

    So in theory we hunters who know how to get it done using both methods should find efficient means to help others learn how in reality many of us have to finish a pre-taxidermy flesh and salt job.

    peace

  4. #24
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    Interesting thread. Thanks for all the comments. What are all your thoughts and recommendations when a hunter takes an animal with sub-zero temps and everything is freezing?

  5. #25
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    I have a general question, if your out along the coast line for several days and once the hide is cleaned of meat / fat is it possible to hang it in the salt water. I have always wondered if this was possible because of the salt water, low temps in the water. Then when ready to leave just pull out and let drip out all the salt water and head home?
    Thanks

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  6. #26
    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    I wouldn't recommend it. Could it work? Maybe. However, the saltwater is low-salinity, and full of microorganisms that could destroy your hide in short order. Also, moisture is the enemy of cape preservation in the field.

  7. #27
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    "As for Taxidermy.net Juli, Everybody on that site thinks they are EXPERTS in all fields , just ask em, LOL"

    Uh I don't think it's only taxidermists on that site!!!
    I skinned and tanned full time for a shop one year, rehydrated a few faces that had been salted before fleshed. Agree with most here, it's a pain. Once the whole flesh/skin dry they take on the same texture. A lot of fleshing is being able to read different material on a hide. Skin,fat,grisel, muscle, sinew . A good hand can help a blade float where it needs to. A good tanner on a round knife can cover alot of mistakes from a bad flesher. Salt will penetrate small layers of meat and fat.
    Of course in an ideal perfect world each taxidermists gets their clients hides in just how they like 'em.
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  8. #28

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    Think of salt as a substance that controls moisture through osmosis. Put dry salt on moist flesh and the fluid exchange is radically expedited toward the salt molecules.

    Now, Sea water salinity is expressed as a ratio of salt (in grams) to liter of water. In sea water there is typically close to 35 grams of dissolved salts in each liter. It is written as 35 The normal range of ocean salinity ranges between 33-37 grams per liter (33 - 37).

    Since seawater is roughly 60-70% water and 30-40% salt....NO, that will not be sufficient to expedite drying in any case.

    Plus the living microbes, decaying bio mass, and abundance of h2O make seawater a bad choice for meat preservation.

  9. #29

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    I would like some opinions from taxidermists, I am going brown bear hunting next Sept. in Alaska with my 2 brothers. This will be unguided, we are being flown in and dropped off for 12 days it will be the first have of Sept. so not overly cold. None of us has experience skinning bears, would our best option be to learn to skin and turn everything then salt or is there other options? Of course we want to save the trophys forever and not have them messed up.

  10. #30
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Shoot me your cell number I've got a little video on my phone I took skinning a bear foot out that might be helpfull.
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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyfan View Post
    I would like some opinions from taxidermists, I am going brown bear hunting next Sept. in Alaska with my 2 brothers. This will be unguided, we are being flown in and dropped off for 12 days it will be the first have of Sept. so not overly cold. None of us has experience skinning bears, would our best option be to learn to skin and turn everything then salt or is there other options? Of course we want to save the trophys forever and not have them messed up.
    okay, my opinion as a taxidermist, there will be others.... You should learn how to flesh, turn and salt before you go. You can youtube videos of how its done or go on Amazon and order a CD. If you are truly stuck for 12 days in warm weather you will have to salt it. If all three of you are hunting take a 50lb bag and you should be able to do three bears if you are careful with the salt. Put up a tarp to keep the rain off and build a rack to keep the hide off the ground and so air can circulate.

    That being said, you should ask your flight service if they will come get the hide early and freeze it(some do, some don't). If that's possible don't salt it and let them freeze it. Or is there someone on Kodiak who will salt and dry for you.(I know there is a guy on POW that does this, not sure about Kodiak).

    good luck.
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  12. #32
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    He's going in sept so it won't be to Kodiak. But sept temps can be touch and go. I always bring salt. Cheap insurance!
    I'm not a taxidermist but I used to be a full time skinner/flesher/tanner for one. If that helps my opinion have any value...
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  13. #33
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    not a taxidermist but I can tell you that blow flies suck. I have no idea how bad or even if at all it will effect the hide , but its nasty either way to have a bunch of maggots crawling all over your hide. Take game bags big enough for your hide and get the hide in in quick. if you plan on any other animals you might hunt for meat take a bunch of bags. take the meat off the body and put it immediately into a bag. nasty little suckers will get it quick. good luck.

  14. #34
    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyfan View Post
    I would like some opinions from taxidermists, I am going brown bear hunting next Sept. in Alaska with my 2 brothers. This will be unguided, we are being flown in and dropped off for 12 days it will be the first have of Sept. so not overly cold. None of us has experience skinning bears, would our best option be to learn to skin and turn everything then salt or is there other options? Of course we want to save the trophys forever and not have them messed up.

    This is a pretty comprehensive video of a large Kodiak brown bear being prepped a number of years ago. Also, line up a taxidermist in advance to get specific preferences before going afield. http://www.alaskaangler.com/store/p6...7s_Bears_.html

  15. #35

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    Thank you all for the recomendations, I just ordered that video. Defineltly dont want to screw up this hunt, thanks

  16. #36
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    IMG_2345.jpg
    Can anybody tell me what went wrong here? I just got this tanned hide back yesterday and everything looks great except that the hair is missing on the back of the ears. I was a bit rushed when I picked it up and didn't notice until I got it home.

    I killed this brown bear just before dark on a cool night in late October. Had it in the truck about 11:00 pm and spread it out skin side up to cool on the way home where it stayed all night. I took the head out and turned the ears, split the lips, etc the next day in an unheated garage. It was my first time turning ears and splitting lips. I could not figure out how to flesh it so I didn't salt it but left it outside (dry) again that night.

    The next day I got it sealed and took it to get tanned. They said they would flesh and salt it and threw it on the floor with a huge pile of other hides.

    I'm wondering if I made a mistake turning the ears or if they left it too long before fleshing and salting it.

    Wishing I had HoytGuy do this one like my first bear which turned out perfect. I wanted to learn how to do the work though.

  17. #37
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    Looking at the slipped ear skin I'd say they weren't turned all the way to the edge is 1/16" of a ince from the edge. Other possibility is heat transfer from your hands in the ears taking s considerable amount of time to turn them if it was your first time. Should be able to turn a bear ear in 1-2 min and flesh the ear itself of membrane and the ear butt of meat, fat and the thin cartilage that connects the muscle on the top and back of the ear. Look triangular shape and are 1/8" thick,

    to reiterate on the salt and not to salt DO NOT SALT YOUR BEAR IF IT ISNT FLESHED, turned, all red meat and excess fat removed, ears turned, lips and nose split and eye area FLESHED, and the upper and lower eye lid SPLIT.

    I took 7 bears in today, 4 brown and 3 blacks, all 3 blackbears were not turned, and properly fleshed. 1 bear was taken 6 days ago, feet and head in and 25 pounds of salt dumped on it, no part of that advice is good.
    If you salt the bear why put it in the freezer? It's not going to freeze, I don't get it. If your a taxidermist and your giving out advice to just load it with salt and all will be good, shoot me a pm and I'll send every bear that comes in like jerky your way.

    Hoytguy
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  18. #38
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Hahah Jesse links jerky!!! Salted unfleshed bears are zero fun...there's no reason for that!
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  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Hahah Jesse links jerky!!! Salted unfleshed bears are zero fun...there's no reason for that!

    The bear you brought in was great, I gave your client a discount as the hard work was fine and done right the first time. Most of the bears brought in from guides or hunters who used a guide are the worst skin jobs, worst fleshing and piss poor field care prep in general. You are an exception, thanks
    Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

  20. #40
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    Couple questions for the taxis. Say I have a hide I fleshed, turned everything and salted myself. I have it outside, but covered to keep the weather off. The rainy weather keeps the humidity high and it's taking a long time for the hide to actually get dry. How long can a hide sit salted, but moist?

    Second question, would you rather receive a salted/dry hide, or a tanned hide to be mounted?

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