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Thread: Learning to surfcast this weekend in Homer. Suggestions?

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    Question Learning to surfcast this weekend in Homer. Suggestions?

    I have a surfcast rod and reel and have the itch to get out. I don't care if if I catch anything but I must go anyway.
    I am going to Homer. Any suggestions on bait, weight? Hook type? where to cast out? Anything?
    I am all eyes.

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    Squid and try near Lands End by the boat dock. Cast as far out between the last two structures. Heck, chicken gizzards work too.
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    Hering chunks also work. There's a lot of play and technique/variables with weights, too much to write at the moment. The pyramid/triangular weights tend to stay put on the bottom better than round weights.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I used to do this all the time before I bought my halibut boat. Right off of lands end. There is a s*^t chute(waste pipe) from the processors on the spit that shoots out ground up fishwaste between the last two pillars on the ferry dock. That is usually where we did the best.
    Bait was critical also as those using frozen herring went through 3-4 times as much bait as us for half the fish caught. We always used Salted hooligan as it was cheap and tougher than the herring. We always carried a 5 gal pail full.You can also use fish scraps from the gut wagons on the spit. Just check the regs first to make sure you are using legal parts.
    You will catch a LOT of trash fish for every keeper if you are looking to keep some. The bullheads really put up no fight at all.
    There are also butter sole,walleye pollack,grey cod,halibut ,dollies ,Kings,and if you are not careful with your casts seagulls. They hang around by the hundreds trying for their share of the scraps. I have had my line go over one a couple of times but fortunately they shook my line off before they got hooked.
    I prefer a Salmon rod or a surfcast rod. A salmon rod works good. I like a medium heavy action.The salmon pole will also handle the occasional Butt(my personal best there was only 10# but have heard of bgigger) or king.Usually 20# test line. Though I do prefer my surfcast rod with braid on it.
    Any size hook will work good I like 1/0-3/0 Gammi octopus hooks on a sliding sinker rig I broke a few sinker slides so have switched to the all metal variety. You can also just run your line through the eye of a swivel and let it slide freely on your line.
    For weight I like pyramid sinkers 2-5 oz and Storm sinkers. My all time favorite is the frog tongue sinker. The only problem you will have is finding storm sinkers or frog tongues as far as I know I am the only one making and selling those in AK.
    The frog Tongues hold the best and are aerodynamic so they cast a long ways.
    Cannonballs roll too much and have had the eyes on some of mine get totally smashed to where I couldn't get them off.Any type of sinker that won't roll works best.
    cast out and keep your line tight set the hook right away. if you missed em reel in the slack and let them try again. sometimes they will chase it all the way to shore . If there is no second bite after 30 seconds reel in because your bait is probably gone.
    Morning always seemed to be the best. I think they start to get full after 1/2 a day of dumps from the pipe but it really all depends on how much they are dumping . This fluctuates a lot especially in the early season. It always slowed for me in the afternoon.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Thank yo for the advice. I am super stoked to get out. Heading to Cabellas tonight

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    FYI the flounder I kept out of there were the stinkiest fish I ever had. And I used surfcast off of Brooklyn! Pretty sure it had something to do with the processing plant.

    It's also entirely possible to catch seagulls there, so be watch that.

    A lot of people, including myself, don't keep the cod, but I have recently started doubting that practice. There are definitely people that keep them.

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    Also, surfcasting rules. Have a lot of fun!

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    10lbs of line for every ounce you plan on chucking out there. so if oyu plan on throwing 5oz, 50lb shock leader, the length of your rod plus a few feet. Almost killed a few surfers before I caught on to this little tidbit
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

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    I really like cod. Does anyone know the rules. Major ones to keep in my mind or to plan for aheadof time

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akjohniy View Post
    I really like cod. Does anyone know the rules. Major ones to keep in my mind or to plan for aheadof time
    No limits and no closed seasons on Cod in Cook Inlet.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Cod's good to eat, but I've yet to pull a p-cod out of Kachemak bay that didn't have worms. So expect to be picking a few worms out of the fillets. Pollack are also good eating, and also wormy in K-bay.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Had fresh cod out of the Juneau area just the other night, I think the stuff is great. Wormines varies and if you open one that's too much for your taste.....cut it into strips to catch another one.

  13. #13

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    If you want to catch something then all the suggestions quoted above. But they will likely be 99.9% pollock, yellowfin sole, cod, and Irish lords. But if you want to practice casting and just MAYBE catch a king, try casting off the condos by the lands end hotel at low tide. Lower the tide better. I'd use the heaviest weight spoon you could find, probably even add weight. But if you fling it out 50 yards, you'd have a shot at kings I think. I've never surfcasted there, but have caught a few kings within a hundred yards of shore. Lately there has been a ton of pollock there as well. The vast majority of kings I've caught have been at the low tide. You are also that much closer to the 30ft or so water level. That's about as close to shore as I've caught them. You need to be about in the middle of the row of condos. To close to Homer proper and it shallows up. Too far to the end of the spit, it seems I get a lot fewer strikes. Good luck!!! Let us know how you do!!!


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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Cod's good to eat, but I've yet to pull a p-cod out of Kachemak bay that didn't have worms. So expect to be picking a few worms out of the fillets. Pollack are also good eating, and also wormy in K-bay.
    Years ago before my old neighbor moved south, he and I fished quite a bit together. We came back with only 3 good size Halibut one day. another neighbor joined in to watch the filleting. Is that all you guys caught he asked? No, we probably caught over 30 cod. where are they? We threw them all back. Man, those are chicken of the sea he said. So, next time we go we kept a few ( not for me ) well, we gave some to this guy who was ever so gratefull and Art said I'll fix the wife dinner tonight. His wife was a home-ec teacher. So he has baked potatoes in the oven, a nice salad made, a bottle of Chardonnay chilled and these Cod fillets in a callender in the sink. He greets his wife at the door with "Honey I've got supper all ready all I need to do is fry the fish. Well, she walks in the kitchen and screams Art, the counter is full of worms. They ate at a restaurant that night. LOL TRUE Stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland on the River View Post
    Years ago before my old neighbor moved south, he and I fished quite a bit together. We came back with only 3 good size Halibut one day. another neighbor joined in to watch the filleting. Is that all you guys caught he asked? No, we probably caught over 30 cod. where are they? We threw them all back. Man, those are chicken of the sea he said. So, next time we go we kept a few ( not for me ) well, we gave some to this guy who was ever so gratefull and Art said I'll fix the wife dinner tonight. His wife was a home-ec teacher. So he has baked potatoes in the oven, a nice salad made, a bottle of Chardonnay chilled and these Cod fillets in a callender in the sink. He greets his wife at the door with "Honey I've got supper all ready all I need to do is fry the fish. Well, she walks in the kitchen and screams Art, the counter is full of worms. They ate at a restaurant that night. LOL TRUE Stuff.
    My former life was one of a commercial buyer of seafood. A lot like friends who have been in the meat packing industry, it can most definitely be a turn off. But I would highly recommend people at least try and get over it to the extent they can.

    The worms in cod are at least "polite" in that they make their presence very easily known. Other food defects (as the FDA calls them could make anyone's stomach turn. Perhaps ignorance is bliss.... I LOVE clean cod fillets!! Here's a wiki write up and chart... keep in mind 100 grams is 3.5 ounces.

    The Food Defect Action Levels: Levels of natural or unavoidable defects in foods that present no health hazards for humans is a publication of the United States Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition[1] detailing acceptable levels of food contamination from sources such as maggots, thrips, insect fragments, "foreign matter", mold, rodent hairs, and insect and mammalian feces.
    The publication details the acceptable amounts of contaminants on a per food basis, listing both the defect source (pre-harvest infection, processing infestation, processing contamination, etc.) and significance (aesthetic, potential health hazard, mouth/tooth injury, etc.). For example, the limit of insect contaminants allowed in canned or frozen peaches is specified as: "In 12 1-pound cans or equivalent, one or more larvae and/or larval fragments whose aggregate length exceeds 5 mm."[1]
    The Food Defect Action Levels was first published in 1995. A printed version of the publication may be obtained by written request to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    Product Type of insect contamination Action Level
    Canned sweet corn Insect larvae (corn ear worms or corn borers) 2 or more 3 mm or longer larvae, cast skins, larval or cast skin fragments, the aggregate length of insects or insect parts exceeds 12 mm in 24 pounds
    Canned citrusfruit juices Insects and insect eggs 5 or more Drosophila and other fly eggs per 250 ml or 1 or more maggots per 250 ml
    Canned apricots Insect filth Average of 2% or more by count has been damaged or infected by insects
    Chocolate and chocolate liquor Insect filth Average is 60 or more insect fragments per 100 grams (when 6 100 g subsamples are examined)
    Peanut butter Insect filth Average of 30 or more insect fragments per 100 grams
    Wheat flour Insect filth Average of 150 or more insect fragments per 100 grams
    Frozen broccoli Insects and mites Average of 60 or more aphids and/or thrips and/or mites per 100 grams
    Hops Insects Average of more than 2,500 aphids per 10 grams
    Ground thyme Insect filth Average of 925 or more insect fragments per 10 grams
    Ground nutmeg Insect filth Average of 100 or more insect fragments per 10 grams
    Ground cinnamon Insect filth Average of 400 or more insect fragments per 50 grams[3]

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    you're makin me hungry...

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Holy aphids in my beer!! Average of more than 2,500 aphids per 10 grams of hops. Well, at least I get my protein with each glass of brew
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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