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Thread: Ship Creek anglers... disinfect your waders!

  1. #1
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default Ship Creek anglers... disinfect your waders!

    Ship Creek is infected with the parasaite that causes whirling disease. Maybe time to consider a few simple precautions to keep from spreading this menace to other drainages.

    See this article in the ADN:

    http://www.adn.com/outdoors/fishing/...-8844733c.html
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default from our WDFW....

    The department is asking fishers, boaters and others to clean their boats and equipment to prevent the spread of the parasite which disables young rainbows and makes them vulnerable to predators. The department exercises great care to ensure the parasite does not enter its hatcheries.
    "This discovery of the whirling disease parasite in some wild trout in Washington waters is unfortunate but not surprising," said Bern Shanks, director of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. "We don't think it will become a major problem if everyone who uses our lakes and rivers exercises good judgment to prevent the spread of the parasite."
    The parasite, named Myxobolus cerebralis, invades the cartilage of young wild trout and salmon and may cause skeletal deformities and nerve damage. The nerve damage causes fish to appear to chase their tails in a whirling fashion. Diseased young fish afflicted with the parasite are very vulnerable to predators. The parasite does not afflict older fish because their cartilage skeletons have turned to bone.
    The parasite is transmitted to fish from small worms that live in the sediments of streams and ponds, according to Kevin Amos, manager of the Department of Fish and Wildlife's fish health division.
    Because the infection is transmitted from small, mud-dwelling worms, the department is asking fishers and other recreationists to:
    • Remove all mud from boats, vehicles, anchors, trailers, waders and boots after leaving a body of water
    • Transport only dead fish
    • Refrain from disposing of fish entrails, bones or other parts in state waters
    • Refrain from transporting aquatic plants
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default One more link

    Here are some other measures that have been recommended to curb the spread of this parasite:

    http://www.whirling-disease.org/files/wd_prevention.pdf
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    @&#@^$%#^8@&#^#%@*!*#^#%$&#@%#@^#%@&&!(#&^#&@&#^#% &@^#%#@&@%#^

    ^long edited explative
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5

    Default

    thanks for the info doc

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    Default

    Good post Doc!

    I always thought that if you ate a Ship Creek king, you'd probably get something you didn't want too.... any info there?

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    Default

    Thanks Doc, just another reason not to roll around in the mud!

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    Default

    Something doesn't add up here. If the Elmendorf trout actually had whirling disease, the fish would have to be destroyed and the hatchery put into shutdown and cleaned. From what I heard, and I've talked to those involved just a week or so ago - the fish were just recently given a clean bill of health and, as proof, they were stocked instead of destroyed. It is correct that they cannot be stocked in any flowing water, but that isn't because they have actual whirling disease, but rather, a DNA shadow of the parasite is present - NOT the disease.

    I'm not sure what's going on here with this Medred column, but something isn't adding up between this column and those I've talked to.

    Another thing, from what I've been told, our waters are generally just too cold for this disease. That is likely our saving grace in this situation.

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