Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Kodiak Commercial Pollock Fishery

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,073

    Default Kodiak Commercial Pollock Fishery

    Again from Laine Welch. How does this fishery pay? I know it is a test fishery but they are only taking 500,000lbs at 12-14 cents a pound, if there are more than a few boats doing this fishery I don't see how they could pay for fuel at those prices. Or am I missing something?


    Kodiak seiners will be scooping up pollock starting this week.

    You heard right. Seiners have a chance to test the waters to determine if a directed pollock fishery makes sense for that type of gear in the Gulf.

    Except for a small jig fishery, the only pollock fishery operating in state waters (shore to three miles) is at Prince William Sound, where trawlers this year have an 8.5 million-pound catch.


    "The initial seine opportunity will just run from April 11 through June 8 so we don't overlap with salmon season. And during that time the harvest will be limited to 500,000 pounds," said Trent Hartill, a groundfish manager at the Department of Fish and Game in Kodiak. A pollock weighs 3 to 4 pounds on average.

    The proposal for the trial pollock fishery got the nod in January from the state Board of Fisheries to operate under a special "commissioner's permit," Hartill said.

    "The purpose of that permit is to test the efficacy of seine gear in catching pollock," he explained. "If it's successful, it will provide information for the board to determine whether they want to pursue a full-blown fishery or move in whatever direction they desire."

    Roughly 190 salmon seiners operate out of Kodiak. Hartill said there is lots of interest there in giving pollock a try. The dock price in town is 12 to 14 cents a pound.

    Read more here: http://www.adn.com/2014/04/06/341041...#storylink=cpy

  2. #2

    Default

    Duh! They're selling all the kings they catch on the ESSN black market. Fresh ER Kings are worth a pretty penny!

    Dirty commies. Always cheating the system...

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    LMAO smithtb

    Quote Originally Posted by yukon View Post
    Again from Laine Welch. How does this fishery pay? I know it is a test fishery but they are only taking 500,000lbs at 12-14 cents a pound, if there are more than a few boats doing this fishery I don't see how they could pay for fuel at those prices. Or am I missing something?
    That's the point...to see if it has the potential to be a viable fishery - "efficacy." I doubt the fleet will have more than a few boats involved, well-knowing there isn't a lot of money in the test.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I was thinking about this recently. Seems like it just won't work. Pollock run deep and in big schools. So the schooling might lend to seine fishery, the depth seems to me to be a big problem. The longline/jig/dinglebar fishery might be a good way to harvest more state Pollock. I'm curious what the bycatch levels will be in this seine fishery, and what species. It could work out and be a great fishery though. Thinking outside the box is good.

  5. #5

    Default

    Bycatch levels will have to be monitored closely. With the way seines work, they'll get kings.

  6. #6
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Bycatch levels will have to be monitored closely. With the way seines work, they'll get kings.
    With the way seines work there is also the possibility that those same kings could possibly be released alive.
    It might be tough to do but definetly easier than from a trawl net or a gill net that has ben out for many hours.
    But like the report says it is a test fishery. If bycatch becomes an issue than they will shut it down and reconsider the viability of this fishery.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    Good post. I believe Chinook Scale loss in the marine environment would be a big issue. I doubt any King released from a good seine wouldn't have some scale loss from the jostling, handling, and release. I've always heard that about 10% scale loss on a salmon at sea meant it would likely get infections and die. I'll see if I can find some links to the scale loss and mortality. So there would be unknown mortality. Most likely have to assume all Chinook released die. I would anyway until you knew better.

  8. #8
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akbrownsfan View Post
    Good post. I believe Chinook Scale loss in the marine environment would be a big issue. I doubt any King released from a good seine wouldn't have some scale loss from the jostling, handling, and release. I've always heard that about 10% scale loss on a salmon at sea meant it would likely get infections and die. I'll see if I can find some links to the scale loss and mortality. So there would be unknown mortality. Most likely have to assume all Chinook released die. I would anyway until you knew better.
    Not to stir things up but i guess the scale loss death theory doesn't count for kenai kings ???

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I would think it does to a point potbuilder.......but since they are in-river they are dying anyway. I believe the slime coat is a little more robust once in fresh water. 100% mortality no matter what anyway. In the marine environment any given fish may or may not die. Most will die for a bunch of reasons anyway, but not all. So if a marine king losses scales and dies it impacts returns differently imo. I was just pointing out that a young Chinook handled while in that point of it's life cycle will likely die from scale loss leading to various health issues.

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akbrownsfan View Post
    I would think it does to a point potbuilder.......but since they are in-river they are dying anyway. I believe the slime coat is a little more robust once in fresh water. 100% mortality no matter what anyway. In the marine environment any given fish may or may not die. Most will die for a bunch of reasons anyway, but not all. So if a marine king losses scales and dies it impacts returns differently imo. I was just pointing out that a young Chinook handled while in that point of it's life cycle will likely die from scale loss leading to various health issues.
    My point was that if they are caught and released in river and they die they still don't spawn, i think they get weaker when in river and would die easier from the stresses of being caught & released(maybe more than once).

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  11. #11

    Default

    I believe one reason for this fishery is so a state waters pollack quota will be set aside before the Gulf becomes "rationalized" and 100% goes to the draggers.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I agree with both of you.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •