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Thread: Trying to fish them lakers

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    Default Trying to fish them lakers

    Hello everyone, i just came back from Long lake on the old highway and i tried a area around 25 feet and the 10 foot area by the big rock and a 70-80 foot area and i cant seem to get those **** lakers to bite, any one else have a idea or a better lake to get lake trout? I was using tubes with no bait, and a couple random spoons.

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    Member FullCryHounds's Avatar
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    6-10" tubes. Keep them on the bottom. Some days they prefer lighter colored jigs, other days dark. If you jig them up more then 6" off the bottom, you'll spook the fish and they'll leave for good. A Vexillar is a must for catching lakers through the ice so you know when they are about to hit. They take it so light, most guys don't feel it.
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    Ya i was using a 5 inch tube that "glows in the dark" with no bait attached, and a ice fishing fish fider and no luck. I was surprised i didnt get one hit. Around this time a year i figured they would be the deepest part of the lake. Even on Long lake i figured it would of been a win since i was on normal rainbow drop off areas. i did do a couple high jig that could be why

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    Three or four inch White Berkley Power Tubes on a 1/2 to 3/4 ounce jig head with a strong hook and some times tipped with a little whitefish will produce. As far as where the fish are located it varies from lake to lake. All I can say is keep trying


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    you said ice fish finder what type ? if you don't see fish on the fish finder move on after a couple of min's
    if you want to produce fish, most of the time , you will have to spring for a real good one it helps a lot a VEXILLA is one of the better ones out there now $$$ I think SID

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    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FullCryHounds View Post
    6-10" tubes. Keep them on the bottom. Some days they prefer lighter colored jigs, other days dark. If you jig them up more then 6" off the bottom, you'll spook the fish and they'll leave for good.
    In my very limited experience fishing for lake trout in Alaska I would respectfully disagree. Although you can dig in the dirt for them, and I have caught some like that and have seen others do the same. I have most of the time seen active fish rise up or chase my tube (while making big jigs, or quickly activley raising and lowering) in the water column from many different depths. Case in point: I was fishing in 143 feet of water yesterday and had active fish caught at 30 feet, 60 feet, 110 feet. Working the water colmn will bring in the cheetas out looking for a meal. Remember you are vertically fishing and can only cover a small area (up and down) unlike casting horizontally to cover a wider area of water. It been my experience to actually work the water to attract hungry fish. The fish can see you junk from a suprisingly good distance away, and if they want it they will come get it.

    "A Vexillar is a must for catching lakers through the ice so you know when they are about to hit."

    Totally agree! Without my Vexilar I would be blind to see fish marking in the water column at various depths. The Vexilar allows me to reel up or down to where the fish appear, and try to entice a bit by teasing my offering right in front of the fish.

    "They take it so light, most guys don't feel it."

    This is probaly true for the most part when your digging in the dirt for them, however mst lake trout and arctic char I have caught slam it very hard. I have know problem knowing when I get a bite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlcanRon View Post
    As far as where the fish are located it varies from lake to lake. All I can say is keep trying
    Solid advice .....guess its just the random-ness of Hard Luck?
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmmccleary View Post
    Ya i was using a 5 inch tube that "glows in the dark" with no bait attached, and a ice fishing fish fider and no luck. I was surprised i didnt get one hit. Around this time a year i figured they would be the deepest part of the lake. Even on Long lake i figured it would of been a win since i was on normal rainbow drop off areas. i did do a couple high jig that could be why
    If your not marking any fish with your electronics...then there arnt any fish where your at. Move. Dont be arrived to work the column to bring in a hungry fish. The tube jig should mimic there food source closley and if they want it they will eat it.


    I say go as deep as you can and get more water column to work. fish are not sitting in only one spot, under your ice hole. My 10 inch hole can only cover so much side to side, so I have to work the entire space up and down. Good Luck
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    Quote Originally Posted by JediMasterSalmonSlayer View Post
    In my very limited experience fishing for lake trout in Alaska I would respectfully disagree.
    I was thinking about this yesterday as I see that "FullCryHounds" is in CO. He didn't say if the pics of his fish were taken somewhere down there or here. I'm definitely no laker expert, but I have to wonder if catching lower 48 lakers may be a bit different than AK. ones. Reason being, I used to catch quite a few down south, but admittedly, even though I haven't really targeted them much up here, in my 30 years I've only caught a handful, and those were pretty much by accident.

    Again, I could be wrong, but I'm thinking that it takes a bit more finesse to catch lakers up here than it does down south.....???
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    We normally fish 30-80 fow and I normally jig 10 to 15 feet of the bottom 5" tube jigs. Swim baits. Sometimes I use 3" tube jigs. That's what this guy was caught on


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    This guy was caught 3ft from bottom of my hole. no flasher needed today. up in fbx they like to chase there food. here they got to hunt.
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    Thank you everyone for the ideas on how to fish for lakers. Any particular bait that is used by everyone? would a tub jig work well with bait ( Herring, white fish or ) I currently use the hummingbird ice fishing thingy. Which has worked for detecting different species like rainbow trout and artic char. This last trip was the test for the deeper waters. I will try using the columns more, has any of you had any idea on the group demographics found in long lake ?

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    [QUOTE=dmmccleary;1383750]Any particular bait that is used by everyone? would a tub jig work well with bait ( Herring, white fish or )QUOTE]

    I have heard and read many opinions on using bait or jigs tipped with bait. Personnally, I have not had any better success with using bait or special sauce (jiggy juice / herring oil) Some guys swear by it.

    I believe fisherman develop certain habits in using a specific method because its worked for them. I catch lake trout on 3 or 4 inch plain white tubes because thats what I primarly use the most of the time. I have confidence in them because, well I catch a few fish with them (yeah i caught a few fish with them) its hard to change up what works sometimes. Although I know airplane jigs, large spoons, bait (herring) and jigs tipped with white fish all work too. (I caught or saw them caught that way) I will change my junk up once in a while, but seem to migrate back to the plain white tube on a weighted single hook.

    Some guys can show up to a lake, drop in there junk (like a metal spoon from the discount $1 bin) and catch a nice lake trout. They will swear by that $1 spoon until they catch a fish with something else. However they like how that $1 spoon produced and its hard to put aside previous success for something new.

    3 things to remember: 1. You can not catch one if you do not go. 2. Electronics will increase your catch rate 3. You can not catch one if you dont go.


    My experience at Long Lake is not been a lot. I know its only about 100 acres in size and not sure how it can support a major population of large lake trout. I have got some dinker burbot and the stocker arctic char (camel toes) from the lake. I would consider going a little further down the road towards Lake Lousie for alternative locations and increased chance at success for a nice sized Laker?
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    All my Lakers have come from CO. And I should have stated that jigging through the ice, yes we catch them at many different depths. But in the summer, every one we catch is on the bottom. We don't try jigging any where else except on the bottom. We do troll open water and have had excellent results. Tube jigs are the go to jig. Have tried tipping them but that has never produced better results. Here's one from two days ago.


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    Quote Originally Posted by FullCryHounds View Post
    All my Lakers have come from CO. And I should have stated that jigging through the ice, yes we catch them at many different depths. But in the summer, every one we catch is on the bottom. We don't try jigging any where else except on the bottom. We do troll open water and have had excellent results. Tube jigs are the go to jig. Have tried tipping them but that has never produced better results. Here's one from two days ago.
    Probably confused some because this thread located in the "Ice Fishing section" and the questions are about winter time ice fishing techniques for lake trout. I agree that winter and summer approaches are going to be different because of several factors. Your method of jigging in the dirt makes sense now since cold water species like a lake trout will be on the bottom of the lake in the warmer days of summer. Sounds like your either anchoring or dead drifting in a boat and bouncing junk (tube jigs from over the side) on the bottom during the summer, but also troll for them when they are more dispersed in the lake (and sounds like your more sucessful trolling, which also makes sense because you can cover a lot of water using a passive method like trolling unlike casting from the inside of a slow drifting or stationary boat.

    I have caught lake trout trolling bait in the late summer (upstate NY finger lakes) very deep depths near the bottom. They seem to react by coming off the bottom and attacking a meal passing by overhead. And of course you can cover a very large area by draggin a coulpe lines around with down riggers waiting for the rod tips to show you a sign of life on the end of your line. I have only tried open water fishing for them a couple times in Alaska because my angling endeavours are focused with a fly rod on a river or offshore fishing.

    I believe lake trout basically act the same manner throughout the different regions you can find them.

    Sweet lake trout by the way! I bet you felt that hit pretty good when he took your offering?
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    I just want to mention for the lurkers that food source is another reason why they bite. Mimic what they eat and they will come to the dinner table.

    If the lake has shiny 4 inch least cisco swimming around, a bright white 3-4 inch tube jig might work really good. If the lake has 5-7 inch white fish you can probably upsize your jig. No secret they also eat crustations off the bottom, I believe thats what keeps them down town with a full belly sometimes.

    I have rolled many doughnuts winter fishing for them...be relentless in your hunt.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post

    Again, I could be wrong, but I'm thinking that it takes a bit more finesse to catch lakers up here than it does down south.....???
    I was wondering the same thing. I wasn't going to comment, as I've never ice-fished in Alaska, but since we're talking about Colorado, too, I'll chime in...

    What's worked here for me and my friends is about 4" tube jigs. It seems like most guys here only use the XXXL tube jigs when going for HUGE lakers. Me, I'd rather catch a few medium ones, as opposed to one giant one...

    I don't have a flasher, but what I've had the most success with is tipping my jigs with a piece of sucker meat, dropping it to the bottom, and jigging there for a few minutes. If I don't get a bite, I'll bring it up a foot or two at a time, and just keep jigging till I reach the ice. Where I fish (Lake Granby), I've caught them anywhere from 6" from the bottom to a foot from the hole. Granted, I do seem to have more success the lower down I go.

    My understanding is that during winter, they're from to roam the entire water column, as opposed to having to stay on the bottom during the summer months.

    They generally bit pretty light here, too. Then again, it seems as if most fish are pretty sluggish and lethargic in the winter...

    Anyways, I hope this helps. Get a flasher, tho... Every time I fish, I see the guys with the electronics KILLING it. Too bad they're $500

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    I never fished at Lake Granby, so I did some info searches using a very powerful tool called "google"

    seems the lake is a man made reservoir about 11 square miles in size with average depth of 75 feet (max depth is 219 feet) the depth changes every year based on some enviromental factors and the dam. Your lakers prefer to feast on kokanee and rainbow trout.

    have you read this? http://warnercnr.colostate.edu/~bret...water/FAQ.html

    I also located and skimmed over some interesting studies conducted a couple years ago from laker samplings and a study about c&r hook mortality from the location.

    There are many sonars available on the market in different price ranges, you dont need the most expensive unit to give you the edge in increasing your catch rate. At the end of season you may find some discounts for a unit to use next year?
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post

    Again, I could be wrong, but I'm thinking that it takes a bit more finesse to catch lakers up here than it does down south.....???

    I haves fished lakers in mn and there is really no difference between the way I fished them here and the way I fished them there. Only difference j have found is there are bigger fish here!


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