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Thread: Low Holing

  1. #1

    Default Low Holing

    Low Holing
    When a fisherman jumps ahead of you in the next fishing hole or the current fishing hole you are in, potentially catching your fish.

    Don't be a D-Bag and low hole people. Start at the top of the run and wait your turn. There's an etiquette in certain sports and in sport fishing Low Holing is like talking in the back swing of a Golfer teeing off. If someone is camping on a spot ask if its alright to take a run through the hole after they take a pass. If someone is on a Bar or in a Hole you wanna fish, tough ****. Wait your turn or move on. Try to show a little respect to your fellow fisherman.
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    My favorite example of this is in the fall on the Kenai……………personally I pull ahead of the slot I want to fish so when I actually get to were I want to be everything is fishing by then. Some people just have to pull in below you and do the opposite of whatever your doing……. like back troll when your drifting ext…………and yes guides do it too! Guess that portion of etiquette in the guide academy gets dumped with the cert and sticker.

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    I agree with your sentiment, but getting people to practice proper etiquette, haha, good luck! Last year I was trout fishing the Russian several yards upstream of the "salmon chasers", I completed a few drifts of my fly and pulled in to tie a new pattern on, while I was in the middle of doing this some %*@hole, who had been watching me fish this run btw, decides to walk right in front of me and plant himself right in the middle of my drift and call over the rest of his group, 3 others. I then explained to him what an inconsiderate @#$hole he was being while the others continued their merry tromp through the drift area. Even with support from a couple others nearby who recognized his poor behavior, they all continued as if they owned the river.

    On a different day many years prior I was well away from anyone, up, or downstream when a complete idiot walked in front of me at about 6' WHILE I WAS DRIFTING MY FLY, I noticed him just in time to crack my 9' 8WT across his forehead and exclaim my surprise for lack of seeing him in my way, then ask him if he has a habit of catching flyrods with his face!

    Far too many people these days are inconsiderate, selfish, greedy ... #$^#*!, and there is certainly no shortage of them on the waterways! My desire to fish has declined so dramatically over the years due to this behavior that it saddens me.

  4. #4

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    It's spread waaaay beyond the Kenai, and it's so common now we call it Kenai fishing. Sick as it makes me, there's no use fussing at the people who do it. They just get their panties in a knot and yell about their freedom and rights.

    Enuff for me. Someone low holes me, I just leave. They get what they want and I get what I want. They got their rights and freedoms, and I don't have to put up with !@$%$. Kinda confusing to them when locals treat them like dirt, and you'll hear them complaining about "unfriendly" locals. Yeah, right.

  5. #5

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    I'm just putting it out there as an educational, thought provoking, thread, in hopes that some Forum Troller reads it and may think, "Am I a Low Holer"? Hopefully this thread sits with someone,(guide, local, tourist, whomever), and the next time they want to plop in on someone's party they decide to wait their turn or move on to find another piece of paradise to enjoy.
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    I've always tried to be cautious of being "that guy" and I've sometimes been happily surprised with the results. More than a few times in the apast when fishing with the crowds on the Russian I will stand back, not sure if that gap between two people if big enough for their comfort. On several occasions, I have had some very nice people notice me hanging back and holler at me to "get in here, there's plenty of room".

    In my drift boat, it's usually obvious if some is working a slot, or about to. If unsure, I'll just ask if they are about to run it or if I can play through. I have no problem leaving them to it and hitting the next one. It always manages to work out and many of those quick conversations have resulted in new fishing friends and contacts. Also, how often do you fish a river and see the same boats or bankies time after time? Happens to me all the time. People get to know the regulars. You don't want to be the boat that people see coming and roll there eyes at. Keep the relationships good.

    Scott

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    you guys never cease to remind me why i'm lucky not to have lived on the road system. what is this "other fisherman" you speak of ? If there is someone fishing on the same river or certainly in sight at all its time to move. just messing with ya...i feel your pain.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    It's spread waaaay beyond the Kenai, and it's so common now we call it Kenai fishing. Sick as it makes me, there's no use fussing at the people who do it. They just get their panties in a knot and yell about their freedom and rights.

    Enuff for me. Someone low holes me, I just leave. They get what they want and I get what I want. They got their rights and freedoms, and I don't have to put up with !@$%$. Kinda confusing to them when locals treat them like dirt, and you'll hear them complaining about "unfriendly" locals. Yeah, right.
    I have noticed over the years the response you get will often tell you whether or not they are local or not. If you get the #1 finger sign most likely they are local…….if they are apologetic they are more times then not are from else where. But this does not take into account people with good fishing manners or those who just don't spend much time on the river. Either way people should just take it for what it is and respect others on the rivers.

  9. #9
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Low Holers Suck.

    On that note; Big props to the two gentlemen I ran into in the Canyon Yesterday. They came up, we talked, They went up, I went down.

    If you guys are reading this- you two are a class act. Wish all my interactions with fisherpeople were that nice. You guys mentioned you come down in April a lot. Hit me up. I usually Park the truck at hidden creek, ride the bike up to the Kenai River trail, fish my way down and hike out. If you want to fish it out, I would be more than glad to give you a ride back to the truck.

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    I don't fish much but we spent the night sleeping against spruce trees on the bank of the kenai last fall and were back up at first light. Banked a few reds before the guides started rolling in. Sure enough one posted up below us on the hole and started working into our hole. It started with the good ole kenai twitch speach by the guide then they spread out creeping ever deeper into the channel testing the freeboard on their waders. About an hour later after they had foul hooked 1/2 the fish in the river and pushed the other 1/2 to the far bank I had to step out and change flys. I wasn't out of the water 5 minutes before two of them parked their butts dead in my hole, literally standing where I had my last three hookups. We cracked a few over-volume jokes about the dirtbag guide then headed out. I will say he did a good job of pretending not to hear, dude was unflappable! We ended up pulling out and finding a new spot with less traffic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I don't fish much but we spent the night sleeping against spruce trees on the bank of the kenai last fall and were back up at first light. Banked a few reds before the guides started rolling in. Sure enough one posted up below us on the hole and started working into our hole. It started with the good ole kenai twitch speach by the guide then they spread out creeping ever deeper into the channel testing the freeboard on their waders. About an hour later after they had foul hooked 1/2 the fish in the river and pushed the other 1/2 to the far bank I had to step out and change flys. I wasn't out of the water 5 minutes before two of them parked their butts dead in my hole, literally standing where I had my last three hookups. We cracked a few over-volume jokes about the dirtbag guide then headed out. I will say he did a good job of pretending not to hear, dude was unflappable! We ended up pulling out and finding a new spot with less traffic.
    I will say that the guide who parked 100ft above us and walked down to make sure he wasn't intruding before his clients fished, was a class act, as most of the Drifters Lodge guys are.

    Not all guides are Dbags, but there do seem to be a higher number of em on the Kenai.....
    Last edited by Icebear; 04-25-2014 at 14:44.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  12. #12

    Default My suggestion: Whip out your camera/ cellphone.

    When I see bad behavior on the river, I document it. Amazing how often the snaggers, litterbugs, low holers etc. decide to leave or stop their bad behavior when they realize they're being recorded. I've even said "Smile, you're on camera!" A guide who lets/ encourages his clients to "horn in" on a hole gets way nervous if you walk up to his boat and photograph his number.
    LBenz

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I don't fish much but we spent the night sleeping against spruce trees on the bank of the kenai last fall and were back up at first light. Banked a few reds before the guides started rolling in. Sure enough one posted up below us on the hole and started working into our hole. It started with the good ole kenai twitch speach by the guide then they spread out creeping ever deeper into the channel testing the freeboard on their waders. About an hour later after they had foul hooked 1/2 the fish in the river and pushed the other 1/2 to the far bank I had to step out and change flys. I wasn't out of the water 5 minutes before two of them parked their butts dead in my hole, literally standing where I had my last three hookups. We cracked a few over-volume jokes about the dirtbag guide then headed out. I will say he did a good job of pretending not to hear, dude was unflappable! We ended up pulling out and finding a new spot with less traffic.
    I've run into those d-bag guides multiple times. I actually had one pull up on the gravel bar (we were the only ones there at the time), and after giving "the instructions" on how to catch reds to his Filson clad group of fishermen, he actually walked up to me and asked me if I wouldn't mind moving "because he had paying clients". I kept my cool...and my fishing hole. Then he tried to muscle in on my daughters fishing spot....I wasn't able to keep my cool on that one.

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    I was backtrolling for silvers last year and had to move my boat out a bit to stay clear of some folks casting from shore when a guide boat comes drifting down between me and the shore anglers. They don't say anything but I mentioned loudly to my friends on my boat "man one if those clients is going to catch a hook in the face from one of those shore guys if that guide keeps putting them where they are casting!" The ensuing conversation would have been interesting to hear, never the less they didn't make that drift again.

    It amazes me how little self respect some of the guides have. Certainly gives the good ones a bad name.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Makes fishing Stillwater with a float tube all that much more appealing. Usually only have to put up with loons of the feathered type.
    I am no longer surprised at what I am no longer surprised at ---Bill Whittle

  16. #16
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Resurrecting this for bead season..



    Anglers beware, those dirty sneaky rotten low holing folks come in all shapes and sizes. They might have flat-brims and north face jackets, or they might be that benign looking old man with a jansport backpack older than me. Or they might have a shiny willie with a big fat green sticker.. They might use their children or wife or girlfriend to justify it. You just never know... Until BAM they've low holed you..

    Fight back America, Together we can end low holing once and for all.

  17. #17
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    The epidemic is spreading northward!

    A group of fours guys got me pretty good on MT Creek the weekend before last. After floating through my hole (unavoidable), they each pulled up about 30 yds downstream, spread out, and proceeded to flog the water (and surrounding foliage) for a good 20 mins as I stood there just holding my, er, rod. I eventually walked over and suggested they leave a little buffer next time. Only one guy responded; tersely. This despite the mile or so of river they would float and fish before the next access point (I had hiked up a ways to get away from the crowds).

    To be honest I'm still not 100% clear on the protocol for the Kenai. It's a busy river with some longggggg gravel bars, so maybe the usual etiquette isn't as strictly applicable as on other rivers? E.g. if there's someone at the top of a 200 yard gravel bar, can I pull up onto the bottom end, or do I have to wait for him/her to fish all the way down? What I DO know is that we should be cognizant of other anglers and try to accomodate each other. And when in doubt, a quick conversation can go a long way....

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    Hey Dinker. In your gravel bar example, I don't think hitting the tail end of it is a big deal, especially on a busy river like the Kenai. Overall, if I have any doubt if I'm getting in someone's space (which can vary by river) I simply ask, just like you said. That has worked out both when I'm on foot or in my drift boat.

    I live a few minutes from Fish Creek and have been down there the last few day targeting Coho. Small creek, very tight quarters fishing. When I walked up to a particular hole I found a few guys fishing it and a few guys back on the gravel. I stood and watched for a few minutes and then asked the guys on the gravel if they are re-rigging or if I can jump in the open spot. Both seemed pleasantly surprised and told me to step in and go for it. It's not their river or their fishing hole, but I don't mind showing the respect to the folks that got there before me. That opened the door to a few great hours of friendly fishing and good conversation. No drama and everybody left with their limits.

    In general, I take things lightly on the water. I have far more important things in life to get worked up about. However, as has been mentioned earlier in the thread, there are plenty of times when punk low-holers need to be called out and schooled on proper etiquette. Usually when it's deliberate or repeated.

    Scott

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