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Thread: Necessities

  1. #1

    Default Necessities

    I have an opportunity to do some flying for a hunting guide this fall with my supercub. I am putting a list together of things to bring with in the plane when I fly up in August. What are some things you have found that you can't live without or work better than others? Personally and for the plane.
    Thanks
    WR

  2. #2

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    Garmin 296 or better
    noise cancelling headset
    sleeping bag for unexpected delays far from hotels

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    A sleeping bag. A tarp to cover all the stuff you toss outside so you can sleep in the plane. Duckbills and something to drive them so your plane stays put overnight. A sat phone. Nature Valley granola bars (they last forever). A full water bottle and a purifier to refill it. Good tools, duct tape, and safety wire. A flashlight, so you can read every printed word including the labels on everything in the plane to pass the time.

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by goosepilot View Post
    I have an opportunity to do some flying for a hunting guide this fall with my supercub. I am putting a list together of things to bring with in the plane when I fly up in August. What are some things you have found that you can't live without or work better than others? Personally and for the plane.
    Thanks
    WR
    Have a quick look at Alaska's laws. They REQUIRE a firearm and ammunition and other little goodies that you may not be used to or aware of.

    Beyond that, a really good knife, really, REALLY good raingear, and hip boots that you can COMFORTABLY walk it. And for a LONG walk!

    A good fire starting system, just in case things go south for you some time. Empty shotgun shells work in a pinch: just cut the open ends amd peel them back like bananas. They have lots of wax in the paper portion. That presumes you have dry matches, of course. Carry "kitchen matches" in a steel container only! I once saw a plastic match holder explode and burn! I prefer a steel and flint thing. Works even when wet.

    A small Swede saw never hurts, either. CHOPPING firewood is a real drag, presuming you're gonna have to make a Siwash camp for a day or two. Insect repellant, of course, and a good rain cover for your sleeping bag. Just in case your Cub isn't in a position that promotes sleeping inside it ..........................

    Just sit quietly one evening and think up a nearly worst-case scenario. You'll probably get all the answers you need all by yourself.

    And, good luck with your flying for an Alaska guide. A word of caution: if you don't really know the guy, get it on paper, and get expense money up front.

    Low and slow,

    Mort

  5. #5

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    Thanks guys, all good ideas.

    I will be upgrading my 10 year old Garmin 195 in my spray plane to a 3 or 496 w/ xm weather this summer. That was the best $1200 I ever spent and I am guessing it will be well spent for the new ones with xm.

    What temp range bag would you recomend? brand?

    I've got a HK 9mm that I like and have shot alot. I'm sure most like a 44mag or larger cal, but I have always placed more on a familiar gun and a well placed shot than just a big bore. Am I nieve in that thinking or will my 9 fill the bill?

    Any advice on brand of raingear or hip boots?

    Are there plane covers or tie downs, etc that you like or don't like?

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    Firearms are no longer required. The state dropped that provision a few years ago. I still carry one.

    Covers? Alaskan Wing Covers is my favorite brand. Poly tarps or visqueen work well in a pinch. Carry parachute cord!

    Tie downs? Duckbill anchors. They're easy to find around Anchorage. Once you drive them in you can't get them back out, but that's kinda the point!

    I like down sleeping bags. They're light, they stuff into small bags, and they work. I prefer any bag to be rated about 20* colder than the coldest temps I anticipate seeing. It's easier to cool off in a too-warm bag than it is to stay warm in a not-warm-enough bag. With down the size and weight penalty are a non issue.

    As far as I know the weather feature of the 396/496 Garmin units doesn't work up here. That may have changed recently. I use a 196 and a 296.

    Raingear? I like Impertech. Boots? LaCrosse ankle fit hip boots. On floats I wear loose ankle waders so I can kick them off if I accidentally go swimming, but for walking, nothing beats ankle fits. Personally I don't carry hip boots in a wheel plane. I'm already wearing good gore tex boots when I take off.

    I prefer helmets to headsets in a Cub. I prefer wool to polar fleece, both for static and flammability advantages. I think a sat phone is the best tool for your survival and also the best way to let others know you're okay and just holding out for better weather. I don't want somebody worrying or searching for me while I'm tucked into the sack waiting for the sky to lift.

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by goosepilot View Post
    Thanks guys, all good ideas.

    I will be upgrading my 10 year old Garmin 195 in my spray plane to a 3 or 496 w/ xm weather this summer. That was the best $1200 I ever spent and I am guessing it will be well spent for the new ones with xm.

    What temp range bag would you recomend? brand?

    I've got a HK 9mm that I like and have shot alot. I'm sure most like a 44mag or larger cal, but I have always placed more on a familiar gun and a well placed shot than just a big bore. Am I nieve in that thinking or will my 9 fill the bill?

    Any advice on brand of raingear or hip boots?

    Are there plane covers or tie downs, etc that you like or don't like?
    Okay, I'll sign in on the firearms matter, knowing there are a lot out there who won't agree with me. But, here goes ......................

    The .44 Mag is incredibly overrated, period. It has a terribly poor sectional density (the bullets are too wide for their lengths), and penetration on meat simply couldn't be much worse! Best I've personally seen was 1 1/8". The recoil is, of course, "manly" if that's your goal.

    My own use boiled down to a .41 Magnum. Excellent penetration (for a handgun!), tolerable recoil, and EXTREMELY accurate. I admit I carried a Ruger .41 in the Blackhawk model for 30-years, and was never sorry. It's a heavy beast, but dependable in all weather. The long hammer fall is a drawback to many, but it never bothered me. Mine was modified a bit (I installed a large-aperture peep rear sight), including cutting about one and one-half turns off the hammer spring. Honed it just a bit, and could hit he old $0.50 piece once or twice out of three shots at thirty yards. The piece was consistently accurate, and didn't punish me with every shot.

    Al Goerg, author of "Pioneering Handgun Hunting," taught me the wisdom of a shulder rig rather than a belt holster (it was certainly better for sitting in the pilot's seat!), and I came to favor that.

    There may be better calibers these days, but I don't personally know of any.

    As to the down bag, I agree except for those times when there's no easy way to keep the bag dry! Once the down filling gets wet and settles out, only your tumble dryer at home will help you. In the meantime, you'll be one cold airplane driver!

    As to your HK 9-mm, If I personally HAD to carry an automatic, it would be a .45 Colt. Between rain, snow, mud, weeds and extreme freezing, I could never get behind an auto. Give me something with a hammer that I can force back with two thumbs, if need be. Just don't oil the firing pin!

    So much for opinions, huh?

    Regards

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    If you want a versatile "survival" gun toss the pistol in the closet and take a 12 gauge. It'll stop a bear or moose more effectively than a pistol and still shoot a bird for dinner.

    Hey Mort, 21st century fabrics have pretty much eliminated the wet factor in down sleeping bags. Bivy sacks had it covered prior to that.

    goosepilot, your revenue producing passengers are going to have more junk to carry than you'll want to take. For the purposes of W&B you're about to lose a lot of weight, at least on paper. Most of your stuff will get left behind. You're going to want anything you take to be small and light. Do you have a belly pod yet?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    If you want a versatile "survival" gun toss the pistol in the closet and take a 12 gauge. It'll stop a bear or moose more effectively than a pistol and still shoot a bird for dinner.

    Hey Mort, 21st century fabrics have pretty much eliminated the wet factor in down sleeping bags. Bivy sacks had it covered prior to that.

    goosepilot, your revenue producing passengers are going to have more junk to carry than you'll want to take. For the purposes of W&B you're about to lose a lot of weight, at least on paper. Most of your stuff will get left behind. You're going to want anything you take to be small and light. Do you have a belly pod yet?

    You're right about the 12-gauge. But, you're gonna wanna be ****ed close, if it's a bear you're messin' with! My biggest poroblem with long guns was that they were a problem to always keep close to hand: when fly fishing, where is the ****ed thing? There are a zillion times when the ol' 12-gauge is just one or two steps too far away. Like when you're jumpin' inand out of the float-mounted Super Cub. Still, I agree with the greater value of the 12-gauge ----------- as long as you have it in your hand. Though I'd certainly dispsense with the 00-buckshot and stick with the rifled slugs.

    The bivy sacks were a bit like the Gore-tex: once you sat on the Gore-tex it was no longer dry inside, right? But, you're right.

    Anyway, thanks, Mr. Pid: I stand corrected.

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    For what it's worth, my gun of choice is usually a 500 mag pistol. The reason is that the biggest probability of me needing it will be on a salmon stream, and like you said, long guns are a pain to carry.

    My response about the down bag was a knee-jerk one. I hear the wet down story constantly yet I've never experienced it or been with anyone who has. It's like an old wives tale that just won't die. If wives tales were true I'd have been blind a long time ago!

    I got used to using bivy sacks by spending the night in a tent in Yakutat. The humidity will make it rain inside the shelter so you learn to deal with it. I never had a problem with my gore-tex bivy because I was at rest. Gore-tex works great until your perspiration rate exceeds the breathability rate of the fabric. Since my bivy bag fits but one, my activity level was always low.

    Cheers.

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    I like to wear a nomex float vest since I am almost always on floats or near water.
    Last edited by Float Pilot; 08-04-2007 at 15:40.
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    And I have my 17 pound survival gear box that gets moved around to whatever aircraft I happen to be flying. The waterproof box makes a good water hauling bucket, a camp stool, a refueling step, and a good box. My little stove uses av-gas.
    Last edited by Float Pilot; 08-04-2007 at 15:40.
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  13. #13

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    Are you politely telling me to lose the 9mm?

    Which sat phone do you use?

    I heard about poor to no wx on garmins, regardless of whether or not it works in AK, it will come in handy to track weather as I am spraying and I like to have some tunes playing to keep me relaxed as I'm going back and forth all day.

    My plane has a 32 gal fuel pod right now. Are there any pods that can be used with the fuel pod or is it one or the other type of deal?

    Where can I get one of those orange boxes? Is all that "stuff" individually sourced or does it come as a kit? What stove do you use? Is it modified for avgas?

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    Unfortunately the 9mm cartridge has almost NO value at all when it comes to protecting yourself from large four legged critters. For zapping little ducks and birds I carry a titanium 8-shot 22 S&W. (seen in above photo) The 50 rounds of CCI-stingers and the gun are very light and I can swim to shore in that vest. Often I have a large handgun in a chest holster, just over my shirt. Maybe I will be able to get my 12 gauge out of the wreck, maybe not. I am beting the whiole thing sinks before I can make a round trip. Thats why I have a tube-tent in the back panel of my vest.

    I figure that in most cases I will be sitting there next to the lake roasting a duck over a camp fire while waiting for somebody like Mort to come find me. Or maybe a Fish-Cop will see me shooting a salmon and take me to a nice warm jail with 3 hots and a cot.

    PS, I have been bothered lots more by two-legged crazies than ever by a big bear.
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    My sat phone is Iridium. My stove is an MSR with detachable fuel bottle and it works great with avgas. I store my stuff in seperate sub-packs in a good backpack. I can get to what I want quickly. I also have a couple of MSR cookpots with locking lids. They organize and protect the small and fragile stuff quite well. The trick is to take what you'll really need and be prepared to improvise. Shelter, heat, and water. The big three.

    You'll see most guide's Cubs will have cargo pods. You can never have too much space to stuff gear into. Airglas and Alaska Bush Pods both sell them. Airglas has a combo fuel and cargo pod as well. Both companies are local.

    Here's a link to every Alaskan pilot's favorite survival toy store. Between them and REI you can outfit yourself very effectively.

    http://www.ultimategear.com/

    This product in particular is among my favorite survival pieces.

    http://www.ultimategear.com/therprotaid.html

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Unfortunately the 9mm cartridge has almost NO value at all when it comes to protecting yourself from large four legged critters. For zapping little ducks and birds I carry a titanium 8-shot 22 S&W. (seen in above photo) The 50 rounds of CCI-stingers and the gun are very light and I can swim to shore in that vest. Often I have a large handgun in a chest holster, just over my shirt. Maybe I will be able to get my 12 gauge out of the wreck, maybe not. I am beting the whiole thing sinks before I can make a round trip. Thats why I have a tube-tent in the back panel of my vest.

    I figure that in most cases I will be sitting there next to the lake roasting a duck over a camp fire while waiting for somebody like Mort to come find me. Or maybe a Fish-Cop will see me shooting a salmon and take me to a nice warm jail with 3 hots and a cot.

    PS, I have been bothered lots more by two-legged crazies than ever by a big bear.
    I use a DF-88 Direction Finder, so if you have your ELT on, I'll find you in a flash. No flying the aural nulls, either, just follow the needle!

    Hope to meet you a little further up the creek. And NOT in an emergency!

    Mort

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    For what it's worth, my gun of choice is usually a 500 mag pistol. The reason is that the biggest probability of me needing it will be on a salmon stream, and like you said, long guns are a pain to carry.

    My response about the down bag was a knee-jerk one. I hear the wet down story constantly yet I've never experienced it or been with anyone who has. It's like an old wives tale that just won't die. If wives tales were true I'd have been blind a long time ago!

    I got used to using bivy sacks by spending the night in a tent in Yakutat. The humidity will make it rain inside the shelter so you learn to deal with it. I never had a problem with my gore-tex bivy because I was at rest. Gore-tex works great until your perspiration rate exceeds the breathability rate of the fabric. Since my bivy bag fits but one, my activity level was always low.

    Cheers.
    My comment about the down bag stemmed from a three-day stay along Cook Inlet in a blizzard. The temp stayed around thirty degrees, and every snowflak (there were several FEET of them!) turned to water. A friend had removed my neat North Face V-24 geodesic dome tent so that no one would steal it, and I had kept it behind the head liner, so missed that it was gone. The blizzard hit while I was on an extraction flight, and I was really stuck on the beach. And wet .................. My custom Holubar bag just didn't shed the water. Only had the problem once, but as you know, once is enough in Alaska.

    Mort

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    Mort,

    That sounds about as comfortable as wrapping up in an oily engine cover. But, a guy has to do what's necessary. I like such stories. I get to learn without the discomfort.

    How'd you get out the next day with the new snow? Or were you on floats so you got to wonder if your plane was sinking in the middle of the night?

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    My 2 pennies: You survive on what you're wearing, you camp in whatever you can get out of the plane later.

    I have an old military vest with holster and lots of pockets. I have a "space blanket" stuffed in the back pannel, matches & magnesium sparker & a cigarette lighter plus tinder, Bug dope & headnet, tiny compass, wire, a bit of duct tape (bandaids, raingear repair, etc.) and some other little items.

    In the baggage area, I have a box with heavier items that would make for a nice night, including food, water purification tabs, tools, plus a bivy sack and axe.

    There's a bunch more "requrired items" in the back of the Alaska Supplement. Most are a pretty good idea.

    I like Float-pilot's idea of a roast duck to serve to your rescue crew!

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    Engine and Wing Cover sleeping bag. From my Dragonfly Aero Float Rating manual.
    Last edited by Float Pilot; 08-04-2007 at 15:40.
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