Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 41

Thread: Inboard/Outboard engines ?

  1. #1
    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    231

    Default Inboard/Outboard engines ?

    What is the pros and cons ( if any ) in relation to the choice of either inboard or outboard power choice. I have seen that there is a significant push amongst manufacturers offering both choices. Nearly every new boat manufacturer today are able to offer an inboard option , with many choosing the amiable Volvo penta at their go-to power choice. I am aware that these are absolutely superb engines from a stable and very reputable company.


    1. What is the tangible benefits involved in this decision process?
    2. Is there a notable cost advantage at source , and if so ,is this balanced out via an up-swing in fuel economy?
    3. Is their a significant after care service reduction with the inboard choice?
    4. What is the life span of both choices ? ( do they still have the same life span, I.e. max hours per unit )
    5. Is there any performance advantages from either choice ?
    6. Is there availability of diesel at fuel points ?


    It would appear that the inboard would leave at great deal more room in the aft section ( if hidden under the floor , that is ). Whats is every ones thoughts on this...........

    Kind regards , Ireland

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,117

    Default

    I have had both, prefer outboards for so many reasons.

    Micky....when are you going to buy a boat?? Do you have a date in mind or is this a pipe dream?

    BK

  3. #3

    Default

    Bud of mine had a custom boat built for chartering. Just a dandy, but for some reason he went with twin I/Os. Got two years of great service, then the troubles set in. You name the problem, and he had it. He spent 4 years and megabucks keeping those things running, and lost lots of charter days to breakdowns. Finally spent megabucks again to convert the boat to twin outboards. Happy as a clam at high tide ever since.

    Here are his words about I/O's: "Best thing you can do with them is drop them into the water from a good height, just to see how big a splash you can make."

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Outboards take a whole lot less maintenance & they're MUCH easier to winterize.

    I have two boats, both with 2-stroke outboards. All the routine maintenance that's really involved is replacing the lower unit oil & replacing sparkplugs and fuel filters. Once every few years you'll need a new impeller (for the cooling). Now if you have a four stroke outboard, you'll also be doing oil/filter changes on the crankcase, but that's not terribly difficult or expensive.

  5. #5
    Member hoose35's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Soldotna, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    2,891

    Default

    I have had both, and both I/O and inboard with transmissions. For any aluminum boat, i would prefer outboards. For any fiberglass 28 foot and bigger i would want inboard with transmissions, no outdrives. The problem i have with inboards is, unless you have a large engine room, some maintenance is very difficult due to access, but i think inboards are very reliable

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  6. #6
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    Anytime I see a boat being towed into the harbor I can bet it's an I/O. Boat fire? Inboard. Sunk in harbor while moored? Outdrive.
    outboards have no thru-hulls, can easily be serviced or change out props, and should they need to be replaced it's a pretty turn-key process.
    no loss of deck space with outboards either.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  7. #7
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    I have had both, and both I/O and inboard with transmissions. For any aluminum boat, i would prefer outboards. For any fiberglass 28 foot and bigger i would want inboard with transmissions, no outdrives. The problem i have with inboards is, unless you have a large engine room, some maintenance is very difficult due to access, but i think inboards are very reliable

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk
    I agree with Hoose35.. I've had all 3 types, I/O, straight Inboard, and outboards. I had a 28ft Glassply with twin Isuzu's The framily loved it.. but a boat that size is too big to trailer, and if a boat that size isn't making money, it's costing a lot of money.. Had a 28ft Bayliner with a Volvo (350 Chevyu) I/O. after 3 or 4 years we started spending big bucks on the bleeping O/D and the motor was miserable to change the oil or do maintenance on as there was no room. Now we have a little 22ft Arima with a pair of 90HP hondas, that trailers beautifully and knows where some good waypoints for halibut are and all the grandkids have had a lot of fun fishing with it. Just not all at the same time... So in reality it's not the best family boat.. Which leads back to a statement I made about 40 yrs ago.. There is NO perfect boat, a guy really needs to have 3 maybe 4 boats to do everything there is to do...

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Redwood City, CA
    Posts
    311

    Default

    There used to be more, but there is only one "pro" left for gas inboards; they are cheaper to buy.

    The only inboard arrangement I have considered for a boat in the 25' range is direct drive with an in-line diesel engine in the center of the boat. Shamrock and a few others build boats with this layout. This layout is great for center consoles, but not the best for cabin boats.

    Big_E

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    the out board's are a lot better to day, if you are buying new by all means go out board , more room in boat for lots of gas
    longer range , [ go over night ] also more room for the FISH you will get I think
    to day O/B last a lot longer , you will need "" 2 """ they should be able to move the boat on plane at 1/2 to 3/4 gas , one will not get you on plane but it will get you home , the O/B ' s are easyer to work on by the general worker ,
    SID '

  10. #10
    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Thanks guys. The reason I was asking was that I was looking at the Armstrong marine elite series products. Being a catamaran , the 2 outboards are positioned in line with both floats. This only really leaves the middle section to put a small kicker motor on. It would appear that there would be very little room at all at the rear with this set- up. The in-board motor choice of course would free up a lot of room at the back. My worry was that due to the configuration of the aft deck the engines may or may not take up a lot of fishing space. ( the fish cleaning table is not positioned centrally , but to the right hand side ). I had reasoned the in-board option may have freed up some further space. I am led to believe that the catamarans are a lot heavier than a normal monohull so its a bare minimum of 600 horses to push her....


    Kind regards Michael Meade MBA

  11. #11

    Default

    Lotta cats around with big twin outboards.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    try the Alaska power boat section on this forum for more info SID

  13. #13

    Default

    I would think really hard about the cat, and about inboards. As in, I'd not do them.

    A regular hull, with 4 Stroke outboards is the only way I'd go. Don't over think yourself into something you won't want, that is difficult to pull out of the water, and that you can't get worked on. You want something you can trailer, store, and get worked on.

  14. #14
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Old Harbor, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,359

    Default

    If you plan to be a weekend boater go with out boards. If you plans to use the boat daily go with diesel.
    Providing trips for multilpe species for over 20 yrs
    www.kodiakcombos.com

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,959

    Default

    In the last few years lots of used catamaran have been sold. Doing boat repair in my shop I have seen some very strange things with cats like, cracked welds, and water dripping out of places it should not be. If you get a cat be ready to have a hard ride in bigger chop, and if you have a motor go out on you be ready to only turn in one direction all the way home. In small chop they are great, but they need more power it get up and move. Cats have to get up and move to work well.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I have an older almar with Volvo diesel I/O and am keeping up with it, but life sure was easier when I was feeding a single big outboard. If I had a bit of money and set out to build a no-bs west coast fishing boat, I'd have North River build me a 26' OS with 24 degree dead rise and put either the V-8 Yamaha outboard on it, or twin 150 yamahas and start thinking about electronics and where to go fishing, secure in th knowledge that my boat is a first class killer. Substitute Bayweld or Daigle if they appeal to you more. I'm a pretty big fan of the almar / north river wide chine hull design.

    If I had the money to build an I/ O fish boat from scratch, I'd power it with a mechanical cummins 315 or 370 through a jackshaft to the biggest, baddest Konrad outdrive made.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,959

    Default

    I vote for a 32ft Bay-Weld with twin cummins pushing jets, If you could talk them into the build

  18. #18
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    Outboards--Expensive up front/repair and replace, lose all your back end fishng space but quiet and easy to beach/trailer. They go fast too.

    Diesels--Expensive upfront/repair replace. Most fuel efficient, best ride buy far if built with straight or jackshaft setup. No need for trolling kicker ( I burn .58gph trolling) Longest lasting, even with I/O.

    Inboards gasser--Cheap to replace, easy to get parts as NAPA carries EVERTHING for a 350 Chevy. If you can turn wrenches you can rebuild a 350 chevy for about 1/10th the price of an outboard. You have to run an lot of hours to make up that cost difference.

    Personnaly, I'd go I/O jackshafted diesel before I went outboard, I hate working around them and it'd take twin 200's to push my rig. No engine box in the aft section wither with jackshaft, nor up front. The weight up front makes the ride way better, thing 1500lbs of steel sitting midships. Outdrives are as good as the guy maintaining them. First season I didn't take care of it, $10,000 lesson learned. Pay attention, check the outdrive oil and bellows. I've got 800hrs on this one, not a hickup and I keep it in the water all year. I'm unloading it next summer to move up in size and go to twin diesel straight shafts.

  19. #19
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    What does I/O stand for? Inboard/out drive ? An out drive is the thing that looks like the lower half of an outboard that sticks out the stern right?

    The other option is to just have a shaft and prop in the water right?

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    What does I/O stand for? Inboard/out drive ? An out drive is the thing that looks like the lower half of an outboard that sticks out the stern right?

    The other option is to just have a shaft and prop in the water right?
    Correct. The term I usually see for this engine type is 'sterndrive', but they both describe an inboard engine with an outboard lower unit.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •