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Thread: Any word on the new changes to the hunting regs?

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    Default Any word on the new changes to the hunting regs?

    Any reports on any substantial or significant changes made to the hunting regs? They usually come out by now.

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    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    GMU 13 Yeti, Proposal for either sex and a limit of 2 with 4 in possesion from 3 Aug until 1 Nov, was voted on and shot down 4-3, Maybe next year
    Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I've got a file at home that lays out a number of the changes. Will post it later.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The following was cut and pasted, so the formatting may be a bit off in places:


    This is a summary of changes adopted by the Alaska Board of Game for regulatory year 2014-2015. This is not a comprehensive list of all the detailed changes. It is your responsibility to read the Alaska Hunting Regulations carefully for complete information.
    These regulations do not become effective until July 1, 2014 so do not affect hunting or trapping seasons that are currently open or that open prior to July 1, 2014 unless specified (such as spring bear seasons and bear baiting).

    HUNTING

    BLACK BEAR
    Unit 25C, increase bag limit from 3 bears to 5 bears for all hunters.
    Unit 25D, increase bag limit from 3 bears to 5 bears for nonresident hunters.

    BAITING CHANGES
    EFFECTIVE FALL 2014 (in areas with a fall black bear baiting season) AND SPRING 2015

    Units 20A, 20B, 24C, 24D, 25D, allow the take of brown bear over black bear bait stations.

    BROWN BEAR
    In Units 7, 13D, 15, and 16, bowhunters wishing to take brown bears over bait must have successfully completed an IBEP or equivalent department approved certification course.
    In Units where the take of brown bears over bait is allowed, salvage of brown/grizzly meat is required if the brown bear is taken over bait. Beginning July 1, 2014, edible meat is defined the same as black bear- the meat of the front quarters and hindquarters and the meat along the backbone (backstrap).
    Unit 22C, liberalize brown bear bag limit to one bear every year for both resident hunters and nonresident hunters.
    Unit 23, add a brown bear registration hunt for nonresident hunters, in addition to the existing drawing hunt.

    CARIBOU
    Units 22, 23, and 26A, allow the use of a snowmachine to position a caribou for harvest and allow caribou to be shot from a stationary snowmachine.

    MOOSE
    Unit 18, combine the Lower Yukon hunt area and the remainder of Unit 18 into one area, liberalize the resident moose season for entire area to 2 moose, Aug. 1 – Sept. 30, (only one antlered bull, no calves or cows with calves), 2 antlerless moose Oct. 1 – Nov. 30, or 2 moose Dec. 1 – Mar. 15. Only two moose may be taken total. The nonresident season and bag limit of Sept 1 – Sept 30 and one antlered bull does not change.
    Units 20A and 20B, (excluding Creamer’s, Minto Flats, Middle Fork of the Chena, and the Salcha River drainage) establish targeted moose hunts to address public safety and nuisance moose concerns in very small areas along the road system. Targeted hunts would be implemented by selecting hunters at random from an applicant pool. They will be required to respond quickly to harvest moose from specifically defined “targeted” moose–vehicle collision or nuisance areas, using either shotgun or bow and arrow.
    Units 20A and 20B, limit proxy hunters to only taking one moose per year by proxy.
    Unit 20B, Minto Flats Management Area, modify resident bag limit from 4 brow tines to 3 brow tines, open nonresident drawing hunt Sept. 8-25 with a bag limit of at least 50” or 4 brow tines.
    Unit 20B, drainage of the Middle Fork of the Chena River and the Salcha River drainage upstream from and including Goose Creek, change muzzleloader hunt from drawing to registration hunt and shift dates to Nov. 10 – Dec. 10, extend hunt area boundary to Butte Creek, so registration hunt area includes the Salcha River drainage upstream from Butte Creek. Effective Fall 2015.
    Unit 20B, the Salcha River drainage upstream from and including Goose Creek, extend season to Sept. 1 -25, and shift archery season to Sept. 26-30.
    Unit 20B, remainder of, (current antlerless drawing hunt areas) create a youth hunt only for 1 antlerless moose, Aug. 5–Aug. 14 by drawing permit; Effective Fall 2015.
    Unit 20C, increase nonresident moose season to match resident season, Sept. 1-25.
    Unit 20D, DM795, hunt for disabled veterans in the Delta Junction Management Area: the qualifications for applicants were modified to 100% service-connected disability and a Purple Heart recipient, the bag limit was changed to 1 moose every 4 years, and proxy hunting will not be allowed. In addition, the resident and nonresident seasons were aligned Sept. 1 -15. Effective Fall 2015.
    Unit 20D, DM790, the seasons for residents and nonresidents were aligned to Sept. 1-15.
    Unit 20F, that portion drained by the Tanana River and that portion drained by the Yukon River downstream from, but not including, the Hess Creek drainage, shift the resident fall season to Sept. 5 – 25.
    Unit 20F, that portion drained by the Yukon River downstream from, but not including, the Hess Creek and Tanana River drainages, extend the winter season by 5 days to Dec. 1 - 15.
    Unit 21A, lengthen nonresident moose season by 5 days, to match resident season Sept. 5 – Sept. 25.
    Unit 21E, change resident general season hunt to a registration hunt, and change guide allocation to 30% of nonresident drawing hunts.
    Unit 22A, that portion in the Unalakleet River drainage and all drainages flowing into Norton Sound north of the Golsovia River drainage and south of the Tagoomenik and Shaktoolik River drainages, add a December moose season for one antlered bull to be announced if the quota is not reached in the fall.
    Unit 22E, extend resident winter moose season for one antlered bull, from Jan. 1 - Jan. 31 to Jan. 1 - March 15.
    Unit 24B, remainder of, and 24C, remove the sunset clause and retain the winter registration hunt for antlered bulls, RM833, from Dec. 15 – April 15.
    Unit 26A, that portion in the Colville River drainage upstream from and including the Anaktuvuk River drainage, and the remainder of Unit 26A, extend resident general season moose hunt by 2 weeks, to end Sept. 30 instead of Sept. 15, and extend the aircraft restriction in the Controlled Use Area to match the new hunt ending date.

    MUSK OX
    Unit 18, Nunivak Island, modify the registration hunt to allow harvest of both bulls and cows based on the number of animals available for harvest. For Nunivak Island muskox hunt administration, the registration hunt takes cows and bulls, and the drawing hunt is bulls only. The registration hunt takes the entire harvestable surplus of cows. The drawing hunt takes the entire harvestable surplus of bulls except when the surplus of cows is less than 20. Each hunt gets the same number of permits when the total number of permits is 40 or less. If the surplus of cows is less than 20, the registration hunt is supplemented with bulls so that each hunt gets an equal number of permits. The registration hunt is also supplemented with bulls to provide for 20 total registration permits when the harvestable surplus of cows is less than 20 and the harvestable surplus of bulls is greater than 20 and the total number of permits available is greater than 40. Up to 20 registration permits will be issued in Mekoryuk. If there are more than 20 permits, they will be issued in Mekoryuk and Bethel. The tag fee for all muskox taken by registration permit was aligned at $25.

    Unit 18, Nelson Island, clarify issuance of registration hunt permits. The registration hunt permits will be issued as follows:
    If 150 permits are available:
    (i) 65 of the available permits will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis in the 5 villages of Nightmute, Tunumak, Newtok, Chefornak and Toksook Bay on an annual rotating basis; remaining permits after issuance will be issued as follows;
    (ii) 20 of the available permits will be issued in Bethel; and
    (iii) 65 of the available permits will be issued online, with 5 permits available for nonresidents;

    If the number of available permits is less than or greater than 150 permits:
    (i) 44% of the available permits will be issued on a first-come, first-served basis in the 5 villages of Nightmute, Tununak, Newtok, Chefornak and Toksook Bay on an annual rotating basis; remaining permits after issuance will be issued as follows;
    (ii) 12% of the available permits will be issued in Bethel; and
    (iii) 44% of the available permits will be issued online, with 8% available to nonresidents;
    (iv) In order to achieve the desired number of permits, allocations will be adjusted proportionately until the allocation for Nightmute, Tunumak, Newtok, Chefornak and Toksook Bay reaches no less than 40 permits; the allocation for online and Bethel will then continue to be reduced proportionately.
    Unit 23, expand the Tier II muskox hunting area by including the Noatak River drainage, and area northwest of Kobuk River drainage.

    SHEEP
    Unit 19C, establish a resident only winter registration hunt Oct. 1 – April 30, for any sheep less than ¾ curl, broomed rams, lambs and ewes with lambs prohibited. Use of aircraft is prohibited, except into the airports at McGrath, Telida and Nikolai. Sealing will be required.
    Units 12, 13C, and 20D, Tok Management Area, change nonresident allocation to a fixed 10% of the permits, retaining the existing 50% cap for nonresidents hunting with a relative, and advised the department to separate the drawing hunts for residents and nonresidents. Effective winter draw application period 2014.
    Statewide, redefine broken sheep horns to clarify that both tips must be broken in order to meet criteria for a full-curl ram.

    WOLVES
    Units 18, 22, 23, and 26A, allow the use of a snowmachine to position a wolf for harvest and allow wolves to be shot from a stationary snowmachine.
    Unit 19, decrease the season for hunting from Aug. 1 – May 31 to Aug. 10 –May 31, and decrease the bag limit from 10 wolves per day to 10 wolves per year.
    Units 12, 20, and 25C, increase the bag limit for hunting from 5 to 10 wolves per year.
    Unit 22, extend the wolf hunting season by one month to end May 31st.

    WOLVERINE
    Units 18, 22, 23, and 26A, allow the use of a snowmachine to position a wolverine for harvest and allow wolverines to be shot from a stationary snowmachine.

    COYOTE
    Unit 23 and 26, liberalize coyote hunting season to no bag limit, no closed season.

    WATERFOWL
    Modify the definition of edible meat that must be salvaged for swans, geese and cranes; in the case of cranes, geese, and swans, the meat of the breast and meat of the femur, and tibiotarsus and fibula (legs and thighs) must be salvaged.

    TRAPPING
    Units 19 and 21, extend trapping season for lynx to Nov. 1 - Mar. 15.

    INTENSIVE MANAGEMENT
    Units 19A and 19D, reauthorize the existing predation control program.
    Units 12, 20B, 20D, 20E, and 25C, reauthorize the existing Upper Yukon/Tanana Predation Control Program.

    STATEWIDE
    Bowhunters in hunts restricted to archery only must carry their IBEP or equivalent department approved certification card on them while archery hunting in the field, and must show their card to peace officers and department employees upon request.
    Beginning July 1, 2016, all big game hunters using archery will be required to have successfully completed a department approved certification course. Currently, this is required if the hunt is restricted to archery only.

    Redefine youth hunts to eliminate the need for a special management area. Define youth hunts to:
    • limit participants to youth 10-17 years old that have successfully completed a department-approved hunter education course,
    • clarify the requirements for the accompanying adult based on the residency of the youth hunter:
    1. resident, the accompanying adult may be any licensed resident hunter 21 years of age or older;
    2. nonresident, the accompanying adult may be a licensed resident hunter 21 years of age or older who is a parent, stepparent, or legal guardian of the child;
    • clarify that require the bag limit applies to both the adult and the youth (except in deer hunts), and that only the youth may shoot the animal,

    Prohibit the barter of game meat taken for subsistence purposes. Specifically, an individual or business holding a license under AS 43.70 or AS 43.75, or their Alaska resident employee, is prohibited to engage in the commercial sale of the food items or nonedible items provided by the barter exchange; or to engage in providing the services provided by the barter exchange. In addition, a person may not barter a big game animal skull (except the skull of a black bear, wolf, or wolverine) or a horn or antler that is still attached to any part of the skull. The barter of furs and furbearers, or the barter of handicrafts is not prohibited.

    Repeal the guide-client agreement requirement in all hunts except the Kodiak Brown Bear hunts; effective July 1, 2015.

    Game taken for use as food in customary and traditional Alaska Native funerary or mortuary religious ceremonies must be used in ceremonies held within the state.

    In hunts where a numbered, non-transferable locking tag is required, the locking tag must be immediately affixed to a portion of the animal required to be salvaged from the field, and shall remain affixed until the animal is prepared for storage, consumed or exported.

    Repeal the requirement for a fur export permit.

    Adopt a regulation limiting the number of people in a party drawing application at two people.

    Clarify that it is unlawful, without a permit issued by the department, for a person to possess, transport, sell, advertise or otherwise offer for sale, purchase, or offer to purchase a wolf or wolf hybrid.

    Clarify that possession, importing, transporting, breeding and commerce with some Muridae rodent species (varieties of the European house mouse, albino Norway rats, and gerbils) is allowed, and that an emergency permit may be issued to allow uncaged Muridae rodents to enter the state due to extreme circumstances, such as seized vessels.

    Define “wild fowl” as all migratory game birds and resident game birds.

    Prohibit the take of game with any device that has been airborne, controlled remotely and used to spot or locate game with the use of a camera or video device.

    Modify permits for falconry by adopting regulations to allow nonresident US citizens to capture passage raptors in Alaska. Up to 5 permits may be issued per year with season dates of August 15 – October 31, and a nonresident hunting and trapping license is required. Other permit conditions will comply with standards in the Alaska Falconry Manual. Modify requirements for resident falconry permits to also require combination hunting and trapping license.

    Units 18, 19, and 21, modify the boundaries defining the game management units. The new description redefines the boundary from Paimut to Lower Kalskag to Whitefish Lake and Ophir Creek. New description:

    Unit 18 consists of that area draining into the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers westerly and downstream from a line starting at the down river boundary of Paimiut on the north bank of the Yukon River then south across the Yukon River to the northern terminus of the Paimiut Portage, then south along the Portage to its intersection with Arhymot Lake, then south along the northern and western bank of the lake to the outlet at Crooked Creek (locally known as Johnson River), then along the south bank of Crooked Creek downstream to the northern terminus of Crooked Creek to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Portage (locally known as the Mud Creek Tramway), then along the west side of the tramway to Mud Creek, then along the westerly bank of Mud Creek downstream to an unnamed slough of the Kuskokwim River (locally known as First Slough or Kalskag Slough), then along the west bank of this unnamed slough downstream to its confluence to the Kuskokwim River, then southeast across the Kuskokwim River to its southerly bank, then follow the south bank of the Kuskokwim River upriver to the confluence of a Kuskokwim River slough locally known as Old River, then across Old River to the downriver terminus of the island formed by Old River and the Kuskokwim River, then follow the north bank of the main channel of Old River to Igyalleq Creek (Whitefish Creek), then follow the south and west bank of Igyalleq Creek to Whitefish Lake, then directly across Whitefish Lake to Ophir Creek, then along the west bank of Ophir Creek to its headwaters at N61° 10.22, W159° 46.05 and the drainages flowing into the Bering Sea from Cape Newenham on the south to and including the Pastolik River drainage on the north; Nunivak, St. Matthews, and adjacent islands between Cape Newenham and the Pastolik River, and all seaward waters and lands within three miles of these coastlines;

    Unit 19 consists of the Kuskokwim River drainage upstream, excluding the drainages of Arhymot Lake, from a line starting at the outlet of Arhymot Lake at Crooked Creek (locally known as Johnson River), then along the south bank of Crooked Creek downstream to the northern terminus of Crooked Creek to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Portage (locally known as the to Mud Creek Tramway), then along the west side of the tramway to Mud Creek, then along the westerly bank of Mud Creek downstream to an unnamed slough of the Kuskokwim River (locally known as First Slough or Kalskag Slough), then along the west bank of this unnamed slough downstream to its confluence to the Kuskokwim River, then southeast across the Kuskokwim River to its southerly bank, then follow the south bank of the Kuskokwim River upriver to the confluence of a Kuskokwim River slough locally known as Old River, then across Old River to the downriver terminus of the island formed by Old River and the Kuskokwim River, then follow the north bank of the main channel of Old River to Igyalleq Creek (Whitefish Creek), then follow the south and west bank of Igyalleq Creek to Whitefish Lake, then directly across Whitefish Lake to Ophir Creek then follow the west bank of Ophir Creek to its headwaters at N61° 10.22, W159° 46.05”,;


    Unit 21 consists of drainages into the Yukon River and Arhymot Lake upstream from a line starting at the down river boundary of Paimiut on the north bank of the Yukon River then south across the Yukon River to the northern terminus of the Paimiut Portage, then south along the Portage to its intersection with Arhymot Lake, then south along the northern and western bank of Arhymot Lake to the outlet at Crooked Creek (locally known as Johnson River) drainage, to but not including the Tozitna River drainage on the north bank, and to but not including the Tanana River drainage on the south bank, and excluding the Koyukuk River drainage upstream from the Dulbi River drainage;

    Unit 21(E) consists of that portion of Unit 21 in the Yukon River and Arhymot Lake drainages upstream from a line starting at the down river boundary of Paimiut on the north bank of the Yukon River then south across the Yukon River to the northern terminus of the Paimiut Portage, then south along the Portage to its intersection with Arhymot Lake, then along the northern and western bank of Arhymot Lake to the outlet at Crooked Creek (locally known as Johnson River) drainage, upstream to but not including the Blackburn Creek drainage, and the Innoko River drainage downstream from the Iditarod River drainage;

    Unit 18, Kalskag Controlled Use Area was also redefined to match the new boundaries:
    the area consists of that portion of Unit 18 bounded by a line from the confluence of the Mud Creek Tramway and Mud Creek, northwesterly to Russian Mission on the Yukon River, then east along the north bank of the Yukon River to Tucker’s Slough, then along the north bank of Tucker’s Slough to its confluence with the Yukon River, then along the north bank of the Yukon River to the old site of Pamiut, then south along the Unit 18 boundary back to the point of beginning
    .
    Unit 18, added the Mid-lower Yukon, Coastal Yukon, and Bethel advisory committees (AC’s) to the list of ac’s with jurisdiction for reauthorizing antlerless moose hunts.

  5. #5

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    Thanks Brian. Darn, I guess I will have to send my new drone I got for Christmas back to Cabela's. Seriously? Is there anyone in there right mind out there that seriously considers this a threat? What has the world come to?

    Prohibit the take of game with any device that has been airborne, controlled remotely and used to spot or locate game with the use of a camera or video device.

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    Member mtnclimber's Avatar
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    Just so i get this right... The unit 19c sheep registration you have to take a ram smaller than 3/4 curl, a broomed ram, or a ewe with no lamb?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnclimber View Post
    Just so i get this right... The unit 19c sheep registration you have to take a ram smaller than 3/4 curl, a broomed ram, or a ewe with no lamb?
    I'm reading it as broomed rams are prohibited. They need to work on their punctuation, though, as it could be read either way. As I read it, the only legal animals are ewes unaccompanied by a lamb and sub-3/4 curl rams that are not broomed.

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    Beginning July 1, 2016, all big game hunters using archery will be required to have successfully completed a department approved certification course. Currently, this is required if the hunt is restricted to archery only.

    I'm surprised no one has screamed about this one yet. Next will be a requirement to take the class to hunt with a muzzleloader any where in any hunt? What about an eventual rifle course? Farfetched as it may seem. It is interesting that they did this. (Already have mine so that is not a part of this conversation)

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill S. View Post
    Beginning July 1, 2016, all big game hunters using archery will be required to have successfully completed a department approved certification course. Currently, this is required if the hunt is restricted to archery only.

    ...I'm surprised no one has screamed about this one yet...
    There are a few who are...have been for about a week now.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t-Passes/page4
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Yea, I found it, of course after I posted this, thanks.

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