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Thread: Nikon D 5200

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    Default Nikon D 5200

    I am looking into purchasing my first DSLR camera. The model that has my attention is the Nikon D5200. I have poured over all the reviews and one thing I keep hearing is how the 18-55 kit lens is sub par for the potential of the sensor. Does anyone have any experience with this camera? Again I am a newby to the DSLR world but I like buying the right gear. Most of the shooting I will be doing is of my kids ages 3 and 1, wildlife and outdoor scenes. With the D5200 in order to use the auto focus you need a lens with a motor in it. My question is are you better off upgrading the Camera body to say a D7000 with a motor in the body and having a cheaper and better selection of lenses?
    Current lenses I am looking at are:
    1. Prime 35-1.8
    2. 18-105 or 18-140
    3. 55-300
    Any suggestions or comments would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Bowtech907

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    Member bobmikk's Avatar
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    One thought... DX is not a full frame sensor. If you are planning to get into this seriously as a hobby images, and looking to purchase Nikkor high quality lens, then I would take a look at getting a Nikon body with FX (full frame).

    But if you want a grab and go setup and just want to capture the kids everyday activities (and movies), you are on the right track. Photography is equipment addictive and you can easily drop 1000-1800 on a new lens, once you start down that path.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobmikk View Post
    One thought... DX is not a full frame sensor. If you are planning to get into this seriously as a hobby images, and looking to purchase Nikkor high quality lens, then I would take a look at getting a Nikon body with FX (full frame).

    But if you want a grab and go setup and just want to capture the kids everyday activities (and movies), you are on the right track. Photography is equipment addictive and you can easily drop 1000-1800 on a new lens, once you start down that path.
    Forgive my ignorance but what is the difference between a DX and a FX sensor? What are the advantages of a FX sensor and what would be an example of a FX Body?
    Thanks for the feedback

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    I second bobmikk. Why not go with a full frame sensor?

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    http://snapsort.com/compare/Nikon-D3200-vs-Nikon-D5100

    different camera's but i used this site alot when i purchased my nikon d5100. I don't plan on many video's so i focused on HDR and such. the single best feature on my 5100 is the swivel external screen. i thought it was over rated until it was in my hands.

    I went with a bundle with the nikkor 18-55 to start. Id say find the body you want and get the bundle. start shooting with it and get comfortable first. then buy a lens when your more into DSLR. Welcome to another addiction!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bowtech907 View Post
    Forgive my ignorance but what is the difference between a DX and a FX sensor? What are the advantages of a FX sensor and what would be an example of a FX Body?
    Thanks for the feedback
    The DX and FX Formats

    Nikon Full Frame DSLRs

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    Thank you all for the feedback. I totally changed directions to the FX format.
    Thanks

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    Not a cheap step up, though?

    Have been looking also and was unaware of the difference.

    What's the bottom range FX going to cost without lenses?

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    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowtech907 View Post
    Thank you all for the feedback. I totally changed directions to the FX format.
    Thanks
    Making that change puts everything into a different perspective simply because Nikon has a very distinct view of the difference between DX and FX format cameras. They clearly treat DX as "beginner" and FX as "advanced". The recent high end models in the DX line are about the same as the recent low end models in the FX line in terms of features. For example of the recent DX models only the D7xxx series has an in-camera focus motor for the older AF-D lenses, while all Nikon FX format cameras have it.

    For your stated purposes (children, outdoors scenics, and wildlife) the DX format has an edge only for wildlife (effective "reach" with a given focal length) while the others will absolutely benefit from an FX format.

    Unfortunately the price of FX models is a continuum that begins where the DX models leave off. But if you are relatively sure of how far it's worth going the FX models provide fantastic capabilities. At the low end are the D600 and D610, but there are fantastic bargains with used D700, D3, and D3s models, plus the D800. The D4 and D4s are off in a stratosphere all their own and while checking them out just to be informed is a good idea they probably are not really of interest for your purposes.

    There are perhaps four primary differences, other than the price tag, that separate each of the FX models: Image noise characteristics, number of pixels, weight/size, and maximum frame rate. The 36MP of the D800 are nice, the 12MP of a D3 or D3s are sufficient. The D600, D610 and D800 have fantastic dynamic range whlle the D3s has slightly better high ISO noise performance. The D700 and D3 are older and don't match the newer models for noise/ISO performance or for pixel count. But the D3 has a high frame rate (perhaps not significant for your purposes until the kids start playing school sports in a few years). A used D3s is as good as it gets for frame rate and low light performance, but is only 12MP.

    The D800 has everything except that high frame rate (and for your purposes is the "ultimate" Nikon camera).

    There's a lot to consider, though the price tags on FX cameras get pretty steep and might be more important than the feature set. Check out DXOMark.com, DPReview.com, bythom.com and perhaps others for comparisons and reviews. (Read Ken Rockwell for laughs if you want, but don't believe a word he says about either cameras or lenses. )

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