Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: High Mountain Lakes parcels, what's wrong with them?

  1. #1
    Member northernalberta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    315

    Default High Mountain Lakes parcels, what's wrong with them?

    Been watching the parcels around High Mountain Lakes for over a year now; 4-5 acres each (though most of the lakeside ones are already spoken for) for $3,500 range... that seems cheap! So I landed on the lake up there with a supercub on skis this time last year... beautiful spot, definitely no shortage of snow... could not get a sense of where the lake edge was or which parcels were which, because of the 6-8 feet of snow. Other expenses came up last year causing me not to bid on a parcel. But I see that most of them are still up for grabs, and they just dropped the price about 30% more! So what am I missing here? Is it just really hard to get to without a plane? I assume it's a long snowmachine ride and I wasn't sure if the lake would be land-able with a cub on floats in the summer time as I couldn't tell where the true shoreline was with all the snow.

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    From Google maps it looks like a nice area. My guess would be it's a combination of not everyone has a plane to access remote locations, and it would be a long snowmachine ride. If a cabin site is too far away to access for a weekend, for most people it just isn't worth it as they will get very little use out of the cabin.

    I'd say the extra hours of travel and gallons of gas to haul in building supplies would more than offset the low purchase price. But if you could afford to have supplies flown out with a helicopter and have a plane to access the lake, it could make for a nice little getaway.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    85

    Default

    I ask because I don't know. What is considered a long snow machine ride?

  4. #4

    Default

    Well, looking at the photos on the State site......looks like a lot of swamp. I would not want it for free. Nice place to raise White'socks on Mosquitos, not much meat on either one.........

  5. #5
    Member northernalberta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    315

    Default

    well when I landed there on a bluebird day in late winter I was awestruck by how close Mt. Spurr and the other BIG mountains were. If it ever erupted you'd probably have a lot of ash. The state pictures are deceiving as the topography around the lake is actually significant and only the folks who built up on a hilltop got a view of the big mountains. The small skinny lake that runs E/W is a writeoff. Only about 50' wide and it's down in a deep gulley. I think you could probably cough up a couple thousand bucks and get a Turbine Otter in on the biggest lake with all your supplies for a fraction of the cost of a helicopter. But it would be tight. I just can't believe the access is so much harder than say, north fork of the Big River, or anywhere in Western Alaska for that matter, for it to be 1/3 the cost of some of these other fly-in areas.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •