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Thread: Remote camping: Rules on cutting down trees?

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    Default Remote camping: Rules on cutting down trees?

    Hi, we're two guys planning to set up a camp for more than a month somewhere in the South Alaska Range/Tordrillo Mountains and we're planning to build ourself a small home-made cabin inwhich to sleep in when we get it done. However, in order to do so we might have to cut down a few trees, so i wonder, what are the rules of cutting down trees?

    If illegal, how to do it legally?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norvegr View Post
    Hi, we're two guys planning to set up a camp for more than a month somewhere in the South Alaska Range/Tordrillo Mountains and we're planning to build ourself a small home-made cabin inwhich to sleep in when we get it done. However, in order to do so we might have to cut down a few trees, so i wonder, what are the rules of cutting down trees?

    If illegal, how to do it legally?
    The only legal way to build a cabin here is to own the land upon which you are building. Bring a wall tent. Please DO NOT cut down our trees!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Then you will have to go though the land owner if you want to do this. Thanks, i don't want to cut down any more trees than you do, just researching the pissibilities.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norvegr View Post
    ...i don't want to cut down any more trees than you do, just researching the pissibilities.
    If you start building squatter cabins on public land, the pissibilities are endless...

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    What you are looking to do is likely illegal, definitely a pain in the butt for a month stay, definitely frowned upon by many Alaskans in general whether it is public land or not, and most definitley not as quick as a wall tent.

    Depending on where you are going and what public entity owns the land, there are well defined laws regarding what you can cut. This often entails cutting no green and standing trees, in some places it just needs to be dead but standing is okay, and in others it must be dead and down.

    Heck, last year in the Wood River system by Dillingham we caught flak from the park ranger about cutting a few willow branches around camp and literally a handful of spruce boughs off of a 70 drag yard trail behind camp where my buddy fortuitously shot a nice bull right behind camp on the last morning. This was on land that was part of a native agreement of some sort with the park. Luckily we had fresh bagels and bacon to talk her out of getting out her ticketbook

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    Pissibilities yes! Possibilities*

    And what we were thinking here was to build a lean-to (not a cabin). We won't be needing the bigger trees to do this, and it will be torn down as we leave the place, making the place look like we have barely been there.

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    Now that changes things quite a bit. I would still engage the entity (or at least their website) that owns the land you intend to do this one and of nothing else you can call it a survival shelter due to poor planning

    I'd still take a wall tent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    What you are looking to do is likely illegal, definitely a pain in the butt for a month stay, definitely frowned upon by many Alaskans in general whether it is public land or not, and most definitley not as quick as a wall tent.

    Depending on where you are going and what public entity owns the land, there are well defined laws regarding what you can cut. This often entails cutting no green and standing trees, in some places it just needs to be dead but standing is okay, and in others it must be dead and down.

    Heck, last year in the Wood River system by Dillingham we caught flak from the park ranger about cutting a few willow branches around camp and literally a handful of spruce boughs off of a 70 drag yard trail behind camp where my buddy fortuitously shot a nice bull right behind camp on the last morning. This was on land that was part of a native agreement of some sort with the park. Luckily we had fresh bagels and bacon to talk her out of getting out her ticketbook
    This is public lands near the Lake Clark National Park (but not within). Seems like the rules you are operating with are basically the same as here in Norway. So in order to cut down anything living legally you have to go though some bureaucracy. Usually its easier if the land is private and you are not planning to cut down all living trees on his property you will get a yes!

    We'll be travelling with a tent, but to have a lean-to or a easy version of a "koie" (not sure about the english word) would have been nice:
    mhh9.jpg

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    Sorry, lost in translation. What I meant was "don't ask, don't tell"..

    I should point out that I am joking. It would probably not be a smart thing to come to a foreign country and not follow the rules!

    I also agree that a wall tent would be a much better choice as these guys are suggesting.

    Good luck...

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    It is illegal to cut trees on any Federal land without a permit (Title 36 CFR Sec. 261.6) and is punishable by a fine up to $5000 and six months in prison.

    https://fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOC...ev3_054750.pdf

    If you get caught, you will get a citation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norvegr View Post
    This is public lands near the Lake Clark National Park (but not within). Seems like the rules you are operating with are basically the same as here in Norway. So in order to cut down anything living legally you have to go though some bureaucracy. Usually its easier if the land is private and you are not planning to cut down all living trees on his property you will get a yes!

    We'll be travelling with a tent, but to have a lean-to or a easy version of a "koie" (not sure about the english word) would have been nice:
    mhh9.jpg
    Because that looks SO much more comfortable than a wall tent. (note: Sarcasm button "ON")

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Because that looks SO much more comfortable than a wall tent. (note: Sarcasm button "ON")
    Who would want the ease and speed of a tent?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Because that looks SO much more comfortable than a wall tent. (note: Sarcasm button "ON")
    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    Who would want the ease and speed of a tent?
    Exactly! Building a lean-to is actually something everybody do here in Norway, we learn to build it in kindergarten. Its far from as easy, and perhaps not as comfortable as a tent, its all about the hand work to it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norvegr View Post
    Exactly! Building a lean-to is actually something everybody do here in Norway, we learn to build it in kindergarten. Its far from as easy, and perhaps not as comfortable as a tent, its all about the hand work to it!

    why cut down trees for a lean to? I learned how to build one with limbs already on the ground. Might take a little more effort to find, but grab what is already down. Build a lean to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukon Cornelius View Post
    why cut down trees for a lean to? I learned how to build one with limbs already on the ground. Might take a little more effort to find, but grab what is already down. Build a lean to.
    First priority will be to find what is already down. However, the point in asking is if we have to cut down a tree or two and check if the rules differ from what we're used to back home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Sorry, lost in translation. What I meant was "don't ask, don't tell"..

    I should point out that I am joking. It would probably not be a smart thing to come to a foreign country and not follow the rules!

    I also agree that a wall tent would be a much better choice as these guys are suggesting.

    Good luck...
    I agree that a wall tent would be a better choice, just exploring the opportunities we have within the laws and regulations.

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    On state land there is a limit on the number of days you can camp at one place I think it two weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Heck, last year in the Wood River system by Dillingham we caught flak from the park ranger about cutting a few willow branches around camp and literally a handful of spruce boughs off of a 70 drag yard trail behind camp where my buddy fortuitously shot a nice bull right behind camp on the last morning. This was on land that was part of a native agreement of some sort with the park. Luckily we had fresh bagels and bacon to talk her out of getting out her ticketbook
    Oh gawd, how it has changed since I lived and hunted out there, and not for the better.
    Women park rangers everywhere these days.... and with an attitude. Like mothers to the wilderness or something, which they apparently learned in their college classes. %^&*$!

    However, when I asked a trooper on the Denali highway if we could cut down trees for fire wood and tent poles, he looked at me as if I was crazy and said, "This is Alaska, isn't it?". Refreshing to hear that response. There is still some old time Alaska to be found.

    Norwegian guy- I will sell you a lightly used canvas wall tent if you want one. Old school but comfortable.

    I am proud to say that I went out this weekend, while it is still frozen, and bucked up a bunch of fire wood and cut tent poles for a moose camp I will be using this fall ON FEDERAL LAND.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Oh gawd, how it has changed since I lived and hunted out there, and not for the better.
    Women park rangers everywhere these days.... and with an attitude. Like mothers to the wilderness or something, which they apparently learned in their college classes. %^&*$!

    However, when I asked a trooper on the Denali highway if we could cut down trees for fire wood and tent poles, he looked at me as if I was crazy and said, "This is Alaska, isn't it?". Refreshing to hear that response. There is still some old time Alaska to be found.

    Norwegian guy- I will sell you a lightly used canvas wall tent if you want one. Old school but comfortable.

    I am proud to say that I went out this weekend, while it is still frozen, and bucked up a bunch of fire wood and cut tent poles for a moose camp I will be using this fall ON FEDERAL LAND.
    Thanks, but i do have a tent which will come along no matter what, no law can stop us there! And it sounds like Alaskan wilderness is a few steps less free than the Norwegian wilderness from what you are saying, which is very different from the rumors on Alaska which is The ultimate wilderness where there is so much wilderness that there really aren't many laws and rules in effect!

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    On state land there is a limit on the number of days you can camp at one place I think it two weeks.
    Just to clarify, what is state land, what is federal land?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norvegr View Post
    Thanks, but i do have a tent which will come along no matter what, no law can stop us there! And it sounds like Alaskan wilderness is a few steps less free than the Norwegian wilderness from what you are saying, which is very different from the rumors on Alaska which is The ultimate wilderness where there is so much wilderness that there really aren't many laws and rules in effect!



    Just to clarify, what is state land, what is federal land?
    It's the ultimate wilderness until the cub on floats pulls up in front of your camp and starts asking silly questions.

    Our ranger incident was bizarre, we had JUST finished hauling out a nice moose from behind camp, my moose was on the pole (paperwork, spread, etc was checked earlier in the week by trooper, good guy). So this gal hit the jackpot.....she got to check a fresh kill for sex, waste, spread, got to check all of my stuff (again) and got to sniff around looking for camping no no's and this vegetation cutting BS that is now on the radar, boat registrations, booze breath (luckily I had just mixed up the celebratory bloody mary's), The only thing she could comment on was the cut boughs etc. That, and asking if I thought I had notched my filled harvest ticket enough (rhetorical). When she asked to see my three day old kill site I said "Sure, but you walk in first " the last thing I wish to do is take a good hard look at a three day old gutpile a few hundred yards from the water in one of the world's biggest sockeye producing systems......um, no thank you. She declined.

    Anyhoo, back to the point, doesn't sound like your lean to is a big whoop, but if you are anywhere near a major body of water, I wouldn't be surprised if you weren't contacted by some kind of park staff, and most of that area has plenty of dead spruce to use for whatever you need.

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