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Thread: Brooks walk in sheep tent

  1. #1
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Brooks walk in sheep tent

    I am going to the brooks on a walk in hunt for sheep this fall. I can't decide what I should bring for a tent. I am planning to go in past the 5 mile point and will be rifle hunting.

    I have a couple options to go with.

    I have a bivy bag (that I don't like much as it is very small and restricting) that I plan to take. it is 1 pound.

    I have a silnylon 10x10 tarp that I sewed beaks on - weighs 2 pounds with stakes and guys. I use my hiking poles to pitch it.

    I also have a Nallo 3 GT that weighs 6 pounds with everything. I could pull the inside out and leave it behind and I could also ditch the ground footprint for it too.

    I am not budgeting for a new tent - but the thought has crossed my mind to get a small tipi (I have a 12 man Kifaru that I like).

    Which would you take - and why?

    I am leaning pretty hard towards the tarp. I'll try them all this summer on weekend backpack trips.

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    Member mtnclimber's Avatar
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    What sleeping bag do you have? Taking the bivy and the tarp could be a good idea. Are you going solo or?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I am going to the brooks on a walk in hunt for sheep this fall. I can't decide what I should bring for a tent. I am planning to go in past the 5 mile point and will be rifle hunting.

    I have a couple options to go with.

    I have a bivy bag (that I don't like much as it is very small and restricting) that I plan to take. it is 1 pound.

    I have a silnylon 10x10 tarp that I sewed beaks on - weighs 2 pounds with stakes and guys. I use my hiking poles to pitch it.

    I also have a Nallo 3 GT that weighs 6 pounds with everything. I could pull the inside out and leave it behind and I could also ditch the ground footprint for it too.

    I am not budgeting for a new tent - but the thought has crossed my mind to get a small tipi (I have a 12 man Kifaru that I like).

    Which would you take - and why?

    I am leaning pretty hard towards the tarp. I'll try them all this summer on weekend backpack trips.
    If you take the tarp I would take the bivy.

    If not I would either get a teepee or bring the nallo 3gt without the insided.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I meant to include that I am using a 0 deg down bag.

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    Member mtnclimber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I meant to include that I am using a 0 deg down bag.
    how many people are going? Tarp and bivi would put you at 3lbs.

    If you just used the outer tent of the nallo gt that'd save a considerable amount of weight, if theres more than just you going i would use that option over the tarp/bivi.

    Doesnt the nallo 3gt weigh more like 6lbs 13oz?

  6. #6
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I am going solo unless my wife decides that she really wants to go and pulls through with getting in shape.

    Ya - prob more like 7 pounds - I have the ground cloth for it too, which I really like if it is raining and wet. I don't 2 or 3 pounds won't make it or break it for me (course I don't have the pack on right now either!). I usually end up heavier than I want anyway (expecting 70 pounds going in).

    On the way out I will just take my time with a heavy load hopefully and work my way out - enjoying the trek!

    I have never gone to the Brooks in August so I'm not sure what to expect. We usually go first part of September.

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    I would just buy a basic Coleman tent, they are affordable and easy to pack around plus pretty good and sturdy.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    If your going solo, a sheet of visqueen will work for your tent, super light, most common ones I've seen are clear plastic or black. You can get many uses out of it other than a sleep shelter. You can use it to lay your meat on to keep it clean, line your pack on the bottom so the blood doesn't get all in your pack, catch water in it while your up high if you catch a good down pour, and to throw over yourself when it rains.

    Most places you can scrounge this material from just about anywhere. an 8x8 piece should be suffice, or if you want larger.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I usually end up heavier than I want anyway (expecting 70 pounds going in).
    .
    Have you done a walk in sheep hunt before? Unless you plan on staying a pretty long time, 70# going in seems really heavy to me. When I would walk in 15 miles (one way) on a sheep hunt I'd usually be closer to about half that. But then again I was only staying about 3-4 days....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Nothing will help you figure out what you really need better than carrying it on your back for a week or so. a 70 lb pack is going to get real close to 180 lbs if you kill a sheep early. As far as temps, I have seen 80s and I have seen single digits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Nothing will help you figure out what you really need better than carrying it on your back for a week or so. a 70 lb pack is going to get real close to 180 lbs if you kill a sheep early. As far as temps, I have seen 80s and I have seen single digits.
    Stid, I wonder if some of that 70 lbs could be left in the field or burned if a sheep were taken? Like for instance, extra food#tarp#poultry, eggs#long underwear#cheap rain pants#hatchet#etc

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    I would try to shoot for not packing out more than 112 lbs if you get a sheep, so that means keeping your necessary gear at 40#

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    Quote Originally Posted by iyouktug View Post
    Stid, I wonder if some of that 70 lbs could be left in the field or burned if a sheep were taken? Like for instance, extra food#tarp#poultry, eggs#long underwear#cheap rain pants#hatchet#etc
    Last year, after we watched our bush plane almost crash from being overloaded on the next to last load, we looked at each other and started throwing stuff on the fire.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Last year, after we watched our bush plane almost crash from being overloaded ...
    Uh....why did the pilot overload the plane



    I would take my bivi sack and down bag, and a lightweight nylon fly.
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    Me personally I would take whatever is most comfortable to you. If you are not getting good rest cause of ****ty shelter you will not be properly recharging your batteries and wear yourself out.. Mind and body.. Going light has to be about balance... There is a point where it gets ridiculous but I suppose that's a personal thing. Me I take certain comfy items kind of to keep my spirits up. For some it's a bigger tent others like me it's coffee. I go light but honestly don't care. Last year was probably the first time I ever weighed a pack and it was simply because I was testing out and injured knee and wanted a starting point. On long in/out trips I do dump food is I have a sheep..

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    I like the sil-nylon tarps....but.... The wind can be a bit of a chore up North. On a Spring hunt up North, I rode out a blow for 18hrs in a little solo Bibler. (black diamond now)... The wind can really get ugly, in a tarp, you end up rolled up like a burrito. The little Bibler is perfect for those occasion. They don't weigh much...

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I will try hard to get my pack weight going in to about 55 pounds. I can't get my pack to weigh 40 pounds - never have been able to. I don't have super expensive gear so you pay for that in weight. Just the pack itself weighs over 8 pounds. My rifle weighs about 8. 3 quarts of water and now I am over 20 pounds without food or shelter or glass. I have been thinking about some plastic instead that bivy - but the bivy is better.

    I won't go without at least a tarp. couldn't imagine rolled up in a piece of plastic for 2 days in the rain.

    The last walk in hunt I did was in the chugach and we only went in 12 miles and I started with 83 pounds. There were two of us, and I didn't have a rifle or a bow. We didn't bivy though. we used the nallo 3gt and synthetic heavy bags - but that was an October hunt.

    I am going to practice with weekend trips throughout the summer so by July I will know how I want to do it for sure.

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    I am a fan of the tarptent.com tents, I have a squall 2 and a buddy has the notch. They both have their place, I also do the Ti bivy & tarp combo, depending on the hunt sometimes both go.
    I was in the squall 2 for 10+ hours a few years ago when we had the nasty downpours/flooding and big winds
    during moose season. Didn't expect it to hold up, it did fine.
    I strongly agree 40# or less for the pack.
    The Brooks August temps can make you cold in the zero bag or sweat you out of a tent in your boxers. Later in the fall (September) gets colder fast. Wind can lay the old mountain hardware expedition tents on your face for a long long time, just pray for no lightening while that happens. Take that into account for what ever sleeping shelter you decide.
    I always have a hard time choosing what to take too. I usually just repack and repack until I decide. My wife always teases me about it.




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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    It's tough getting that pack weight down when you don't have anyone to split gear with. Last year I was at about 55 lbs going in. We used a nallo 2 and it was tight for 2 people but I'm glad we had an enclosed space with all the snow we got. Unless you could get the edges of that sil tarp down to the ground then I'd take the outside part of your nallo. You'll end up with weather blowing rain or snow under your tarp and it'd be miserable at best.

  20. #20
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    I solid 4 season tent is never a bad option--just ask all the guys in the Brooks last year during the snow storm that hit.

    As long as its not too heavy.
    Psalm 18:34
    He trains my hands for war, so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

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