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Thread: WHAT is the Allure of living remote in ALASKA.......For "YOU"......???

  1. #1

    Default WHAT is the Allure of living remote in ALASKA.......For "YOU"......???

    Why do "YOU" (Not what motivates others) But for you what is your motivation, your driving desire to live in a small cabin in a remote part of Alaska.

    Part #2: If it is the dream of Millions of American males and a very few females........Why are there not more people manifesting their Dream of this experience......???

    Part #3: Do you think it would be easier lifestyle than you have now......???

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    I understand your 1st and 3rd questions but have no idea what you are asking with #2. Could you please clarify?

  3. #3

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    Not an answer to the question, just a statement: You can always tell AGL's posts from a long distance since pretty MUCH every thread HAS one or two random WORDS capitalized. Of everyone on the forum, I never have to read who the author of the thread is for his threads, it is clear just by the title. Some good questions are posed, so not a problem at all, just an observation.

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    I expect no more than half a dozen answer(ers) to your ?'s AGL. Not many truly 'remote' cabin dwellers would have the ability TO answer. (Lack of internet etc).
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  5. #5

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    The Question is POSED to those who WANT to do it, and not those who have, or are doing it.......

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    I expect no more than half a dozen answer(ers) to your ?'s AGL. Not many truly 'remote' cabin dwellers would have the ability TO answer. (Lack of internet etc).

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    Manifesting......Was a poor choice of words on my behalf. Think: Causing to Happen or to make a desired result happen in reality. Sorry for my poor choice of wording. I have a Strange fascination with the term, "Manifested Destiny".

    Quote Originally Posted by bawanna View Post
    I understand your 1st and 3rd questions but have no idea what you are asking with #2. Could you please clarify?

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    What I want is solitude and peace/quiet. A place to walk and hike and call my own. A place I can do pretty much what I want to do (shoot, plant, build, etc)

    I don't have the ability to live full time remote and doubt I have the stones to do as many on these forums have managed to live. My marriage is my priority and she loves to be away for a while but likes to have creature comforts after a few days so a place we can disappear to for a few days at a time between work is what we want for now. Maybe later it will change as I learn and build more.

    I know that living off grid/remote would be harder than I have it now. I remember when I first moved here and was talking with a nurse who lived without elec/plumbing/water because she chose to. She made a funny comment- "You people take things for granted! If you want light you just touch that thing on the wall. If I want water I have to haul ice from the river and put it on a stove to heat it with wood I cut down." It amazed me that people chose to do this when I moved here and it still amazes me. That being said- if SHTF those are the folks who will make it look easy when we don't have all the comforts!

    I will be a lowly weekend/time- off 'off-gridder'. My respect to those who can do it full time!

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    1) get rid of the rat race.
    2) cost and lost skill set
    3) it will be harder but simpler.

    Ron
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    These are questions that will solicite a highly variable or individualized group of responses. In my case I've spent three years completely off grid in wilderness. 6-7 years in villages. 3-4 years in remote work camps. When I try to add up how many weeks/months I spent here and there in wilderness areas in the last 34 years, it adds up to a couple more years worth. To me it was always the quality of life in the wilderness. Being able to live in wilderness is a rare thing these days. Trying to explain why it is so special to someone who never has, is not an easy task. I prefer now to just hop in a cub and land someplace wild, spend a few weeks there in a tent and then leave it like I found it. Where I live North of Fairbanks, is a good place to base out of. The problem with building a place in the wilderness is you are married to that place. You end up with much material things parked there and then if you leave, you need to find someone who will watch your stuff. I like to explore new country or revisit areas that I like. A wilderness place would inhibit that ability. I've essentially evolved to not needing a fixed place in the wilderness. Having an airplane that allows you to get out and do things all over, whenever or wherever, works out better for me. In forty minutes time, I can depart from my front yard to a wilderness river gravel bar and be getting a flyline wet. If the fish aren't there, in another twenty, I can be on another drainage.

    Most women these days are too hooked to their creature comforts. Their mental well being is dependent on too many modern things. They were brought up that way. It would be a very small select group of women (or men for that matter) that you could take out of this modern world and plunk into the wilderness and have them like it 24/7-365... Trying to develope a relationship in the wilderness would be more like a quick ending. You better have a rock solid relationship with similar desires before, to have any hope that it will function and flourish after you are in a wilderness setting. (fire away all you tough Alaskan women)

    Imagine in the winter getting up to -20F in the cabin. Starting a fire and putting your frozen pot of water on the stove. Hauling 5gal buckets up from the river or lake for dishes or a bath. Spending weeks cutting, hauling, splitting firewood so you can thaw your place out everyday for six months straight. (that's a lot of wood depending on how big your cabin is) your life revolves around cooking,(getting something to cook), chopping wood, feeding the wood stove, making water out of ice, hauling water. (have you considered how your laundry gets done?)...these are just the basics, you don't have much time for leisure. Without modern conveniences, your life is very busy just doing the basics to get by. I might add the younger you are the better....this is a surprisingly rewarding existence. Don't take my word for it though, because it is not for everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Why do "YOU" (Not what motivates others) But for you what is your motivation, your driving desire to live in a small cabin in a remote part of Alaska.

    Part #2: If it is the dream of Millions of American males and a very few females........Why are there not more people manifesting their Dream of this experience......???

    Part #3: Do you think it would be easier lifestyle than you have now......???
    1. I just want to get away from the hustle bustle and live a simpler life (not physically...mentally) however I doubt that truly remote will ever happen b/c the wife's reluctance for this dream.

    2. cost? scared to fail? afraid to step out of their comfort zone?

    3. Not at all. I actually understand how hard and difficult it would be. Growing crops is almost impossible here. Game is plentiful where I live now but I'm on Native land.

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    1) My absolute best memories in AK have been spent on a quiet remote lake, but I'm old enough that a wet/moldy tent doesn't hold nearly the allure it did almost 20 years ago, same with a sleeping bag on the ground vs. a bed. Having that lifestyle every day is very appealing.

    2) It's a time and money thing. I have two kids in hs and one in college, so can't move remote until they are off and on their own. As far as doing it part time in the mean time, the options are either buy land and build, or buy an existing cabin. The reality is I could buy a nice remote lot and snowmachine in supplies to build a cabin, but that would take every spare minute of my free time, and until the cabin is built I'd be busting my azz ferrying supplies with no warm cabin to relax in. So that leaves me with a cabin that is already built, and the ones I've seen that would be tollerable start at $150k and I don't have that much cash on hand for a vacation home. Neither do I want a mortgage on a vacation home.

    3) Easier in what sense? It would be a much more physically demanding lifestyle, but I get my greatest satisfaction working hard and working with my hands. And hence in that sense, getting rid of the business and stress and hustle and bussle would be much easier as I wouldn't be wasting so much time and energy going to and fro.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  12. #12

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    If you men have never read "Burning Daylight" by Jack London.......it is a Man's Read, not a kid book. It is the single book that changed my life. It is a great read, nearly impossible to find in print, buy free to read on the internet. It deals with this exact issue.

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    I'll answer questions one a street first, because i think they are somewhat related. I'll answer question two later as it is more removed from the others.

    My single largest motivating factor for desiring to live in remote part of Alaska is my disillusionment with American society, and, more specifically with American economic life. My parents taught me that hard work is it's own reward, that if you work hard, earn and save, you will be rewarded. This closely parallels what we were all taught in school about the American dream of home ownership and financial security. I am now over half way through my life and I have yet to seen even a morsel of that promised reward or security. I have done everything society has asked or expected of me. I completed high school. I did my military service. I learned a trade. I got a college degree. I got another college degree. I've never been in arrested or any trouble with the law. I've followed all the rules. I've been laid off 8 times in 10 years (I think that is the most accurate and recent count). I have next to nothing in my IRA. I have no retirement plan other than to never be able to retire. I have not worked full time for more than6 months since the 9/11 layoffs that racked the commercial aviation industry. I&eve incurred live crushing, debilitating debt acquiring my college and higher degrees, and I now find myself essentially unhireable. Through all of that, I have never received any welfare or state aid program benefits. My desire is to live on my own land and work that land for my own sustenance, much as Thomas Jefferson envisioned the for the American yeoman landowner. I may not be successful, and I may quite literally starve, but at least that will be up to me, not up to some bureaucrat who cuts a budget somewhere and I lose another job or because some executive bean counter says costs are too high! lay off some employees. I never want to be depend at on others for my wages or on the state of the economy for my job. The only way to do that is to live close to the land and make do with what The Lord provides. Will it be easier than the life I live now? Probably not, but I hope it will at least be a life well lived.

    I believe most folks who would otherwise like to peruse that life do not for many reasons, such as fear, dependency on modern society, familial attachments, sloth, lack of specific knowledge and skill sets required and a whole host of other reasons.

    I believe people are generally afraid to take risks. People like the security, whether real or imagined, of going to the same job every day and drawing the same wage every Friday. They know there is a chance they could do better, but they are afraid of the consequences of failure. This is magnified once marriage and parenthood set in. If this were not so, there would be many more small business entrepreneurs in America. People don't start their own businesses for the same fears.

    Many folks are dependent on modern society and technologies, conveniences, and comforts that it offers. My girlfriend has ruled out living off grid for the sole reason of no running water. As much as my son loves going to the cabin, he is only good for about 4-6 days. after that, he needs his video games. How many families accustomed to the lower 48 lifestyle would willing forgo all of that comfort? No, they would rather endure economic hardship and uncertainty at the hands of the system than forgo their cable television. Professor Steve Haycox, UAA Dept. Of History wrote in his book Alaska: An American Colony that people don't move to Alaska to live like Alaskans. They move here and want to live like Americans.

    Once a man marries and his children he is no longer free to be his own person; he is joined to his wife and they are one. I have a good friend from high school who would love to buy Land and live in remote Alaska, but his mother is elderly and needs constant care and his wife has no desire to leave her family either, so it will remain his unfulfilled dream.

    I don't know if you have noticed this, but people these days are generally lazy. I have seen students and young adults work harder at getting out of work than if they had just done the work to begin with. I think people know that living in this climate isn't easy and that farm life is a hard life. Once again, they would trade that soft easy life, and the dependence on others that comes with it, for true emancipation.

    Lastly, living in the bush or living on the farm requires a very specialized skill set that is no longer taught anywhere in America. The closest thing in the Lower 48 to learning how to live off the land is high school ag class and 4-H. (I should add in home economics, shop class' and automotive shop because those are also must have skills for any homesteader.) Sadly, school districts across the lower 48 are cutting and eliminating those programs as much and as quickly as they can and rechannelling that funding into college prep programs. Subsequently, many people in the lower 48, especially young people have no idea how to live close to the land. Any many respects, it is not unlike what the Pilgrim fathers, the settlers of Jamestown and Roanoake, and the early settlers of Pennsylvania faced in that most of them were shop keepers or other town based occupations and very few had any real farming experience. No wonder they all starved. But...many of them were motivated by a higher calling, something else we lack in today's society.

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    I expected that this thread would have had much higher quantity of posts.......

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Wow...this is a depressing thread. I to share some common things here but come hell or high water I will be in AK in less then 3200 days. For me, I have given so much for so long, a few years in paradise is all that I ask. When I was younger in fairbanks it was a magical time. The outdoors is what I need to fulfill my soul.....I dont want to die without it. There will be sacrifices along the way. The question left is what will I give up and will those things be worth it...

    Ron
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    Member The German's Avatar
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    Mr. pipercub,,,,, Well said, I couldn't have said it any better. And I use my Argo, just as you use your Plane.
    The German

    Attachment 77280

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    The wilderness can change a man............
    There is a real transformation that can metamorphose within a man who is alone in the wilderness. He can exit the wilderness fragile, very fragile, he is no longer sure where that which is himself ends and that which is not himself starts.

    Everything is kind of fuzzy, and has a softness about it, all things appear slightly blurred to the eye, like after one has been crying, and it can be hard to distinguish where one object stops and another object starts.

    He feels weak and vulnerable, but centered. In fact he is stronger, but the feeling of weakness, and vulnerability comes from the loss of arrogance.

    There is a clarity about the perfection of everything. Sounds are crisper, colors are different, there are so many more (new) colors now.

    He feels as if he is looking through things and through people, this is a very uncomfortable experience, he tries to focus, but he just looks through everything.

    Part of him wants to go back to the way it was, before being alone in the wilderness. But he also enjoys the bliss of how it is now. He wants to weep for no reason, but for the perfection of everything.

    He has change, and can not change back to that which he was before, being alone in the wilderness.

    I know not of drugs, but being alone in the wilderness, for long periods will change your perception of the universe. The universe is the same, but you have shifted to a place where you can see, with new eyes, a new heart, and a new empathy for all life. You have been born a second time, and are a child of the wilderness.

    There was a time long ago, that a man was encouraged to go into the wilderness alone for a extended period, so that he might find wisdom about life. Sad it is discouraged today.............................

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...n-Change-a-Man

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    AGL:
    Very eloquently and deeply put!
    Whenever I talk with teens that are having a rough time, I suggest going to the woods and trying to find themselves. It is amazing how many have not even spent a night in the wilderness.
    No matter how bad a day I am having- just getting into the trees, watching ravens/magpies/eagles, or just hearing a creek soothes the soul and puts things into perspective for me.
    BEE

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Just to deep and profane to answer on the web or even in town over coffee.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    AGL:
    Very eloquently and deeply put!
    Whenever I talk with teens that are having a rough time, I suggest going to the woods and trying to find themselves. It is amazing how many have not even spent a night in the wilderness.
    No matter how bad a day I am having- just getting into the trees, watching ravens/magpies/eagles, or just hearing a creek soothes the soul and puts things into perspective for me.
    BEE
    And many teens have no desire to even attempt to hit the wilderness.

    I was raised in the country. I would like to start an outdoor retreat for troubled teens/fatherless boys/suburban and city boys. Basically I'd like to run week long character building courses that would force the kids to work for survival. I originally thought about doing this in the lower 48 but now that I am out here in AK, I couldn;t think of a better place to do it. Even in the village there are many kids that have no idea what it is like to go out.

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