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Thread: Ice fishing technique for lake trout?

  1. #1
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    Default Ice fishing technique for lake trout?

    Got a fishing trip planned here in a week, looking for some help.

    Q. How deep of water would you fish for lakers? Do the bigger fish stay deeper?


    Q. What lures work for lakers? Big jigs? Spoons?

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    Member Ak Laker Hunter's Avatar
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    Tube jigs 3 inch,airplane 120ft a good starting point for me. but Lakers like cold water so they everywere now. find baitfish your good to go . one i got not to long ago
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    When ice fishing, I catch most of my lakers in 3-12 feet of water. They tend to cruise flats in bays or around points in search of baitfish. I use a 4 inch krocodile or some sort of flashy spoon tipped with a piece of whitefish. Its all about being in the right place at the right time.

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    start by finding structure, then drill around until 15-30', fish it if nothing start drilling out into deeper waters but try and follow structure. Stormies work good and so do some spoons color patterns change per water color of different lake murky water go with light flashier colors crystal clear water you can transfer back to natural looking forage.Spoons work but not IMO as good as rubbers and airplanes.

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    That's the nice thing about lakers, they're not typically uber picky though Harding fish are, most lakers are not. White is always a good go too in anything.

    They can also be anywhere. Typically drilling piles of holes is how I get to finding them. They hunt/travel in loose packs, or solos, so you either spend a LOT of time in a known travel area, and hope something comes by or you spend a pile of time trying to pattern them and than sit on those spots.

    Hardluck has known producing areas (mostly due to structure) and as you'll find out people basically park on them and hope for the best. It usually works if you put in the time. Harding also has huge gentle and subtle structure which is a pain to try and find/follow under the ice. One of these days I'll run it in the summer and map things out. Good point is we had a mark we fished the first few years, and was able to find it typically pretty quick. We knew we were close when we started seeing fish on a regular basis. (you didn't have to park right on it). Never did figure out what in sam heck it was.

    As for depth, they're migrators, they can be shallow or deep so there's no telling. Your flasher will tell you what you need to know if you have one. the fish will be where the food is at typically, if nothing else they are usually not TOO far away from them, or they're on the prowl to find them. Whether its chasing the least ciscoes around, or picking snails off the bottom. The state could start feeding them silvers....in 10 years we'd have some serious toads LOL!

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I may not fish as much as my friends, but I think I'm gonna yak. Sit on a bluff for a couple weeks and watch them. Every lake is different. Learn to use your auger. If you don't see action in 1/2 hour......move.
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    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FullFreezer View Post
    Got a fishing trip planned here in a week, looking for some help.

    Q. How deep of water would you fish for lakers? Do the bigger fish stay deeper?


    Q. What lures work for lakers? Big jigs? Spoons?
    Good questions...

    A: Part I -Depends on the Lake Part II - Depends on the Lake

    A: Lures/attractants that best mimic their food source.

    In my limited experience, I have found that location is a significant factor in how I target lake trout. If your fishing deep, sonar electronics/cameras will greatly inhance your abilities and improve catch rates. No secrets here, PM me if your interested.

    Glad to see others sharing their personal insight, sharing will serve you well.
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    I like to sit on one large piece of structure but move a lot. For example a long shallow flat bottom with a steep abrupt drop to deeper water. Lake trout like deep water but they donít eat in deep water they eat where there food is and that is shallow. I will drill and jig for an hour or two then drop a dead stick if allowed and move 25 feet drill a hole a jig for an hour then move the dead stick over to that hole and drill another 25 feet away. The key with catching lake trout is persistence, one to three fish days are normal. I am a spoon and tub person my self but have caught fish on other things.

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    20140309_100516.jpg
    Here is the one I caught Sunday after 3 days of fishing and loosing one the day before as big.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by little dave View Post
    20140309_100516.jpg
    Here is the one I caught Sunday after 3 days of fishing and loosing one the day before as big.
    If you would only get a snowmachine that works. Good to see you are still around.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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    only time I made it out this year. kids in college use more money then having little kids it will be a while before I can buy a machine

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    I am learning that for lakers a sonar/flasher is a must. Saves alot of wasted time sitting on the ice. I watched last weekend where we were in 35' of water, SLIGHTLY TWITCHING a tube jig off the bottem, and lakers suspended at 16'. Reel it up and tease and BAM! Same thing when fishing the bottem. Bait fish dive and hide into the mud or weeds when a laker comes by so try dropping your lure/jig right to the bottem, wait a few and SLIGHTLY TWITCH up off the bottem and then hold still. Lakers usually don't like to waste their time chasing or going after major jigging efforts and most of time bite either on the down drop or when completly still. I won't ever fish without a sonar again..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by little dave View Post
    20140309_100516.jpg
    Here is the one I caught Sunday after 3 days of fishing and loosing one the day before as big.
    Hey, that's my snow machine track you're standing on, maybe I should of stayed in that bay.


    Onto the topic... this is my first winter in Alaska and my first experiences ice fishing for lakers, so take it for what's worth. I have caught a dozen this season, not one worth posting, but still fun. They've liked my tube jigs the best, VMC 3/8's dominator heads with 3" glow tubes. I've only had one come in that left with out a strike on those. I've also had some luck on PK Flutterfish 1/2 oz and above, but I'm not quite sold on them for lakers yet. I've seen a few more lookers than takers when I was jigging with those.

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