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Thread: Costs of owning a 'BIG BOAT'

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Default Costs of owning a 'BIG BOAT'

    My wife and I are wanting to move up to something that fits our growing family better. Currently we own a 26 Hewescraft Pacific Cruiser and we really enjoy the ability to trailer our current boat and go where ever we want. So we've been looking for 30ish ft welded aluminum with twin outboards but we just can't swing the cost right now. We've also started looking at bigger fiberglass boats such as Tollycraft, Meridian, etc but I know nothing about the costs of owning a boat that can't be towed. I've checked around on moorage fees in Seward and Whittier and I'm well aware of the long wait times for the slips in Whittier.

    Problem is, what I don't know is how much it costs, outside of moorage, to own a big boat that is moored rather than trailered. How much and how often to pull the boat out and bottom paint, typical costs for these things, typical routine maintenance of owning a 'BIG BOAT', winter time issues, etc. If anyone can help out with making the jump from a trailered boat to a moored boat I'd be grateful.

    Thanks in advance for the help.

  2. #2
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    There are many unwelcome costs of a slip.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

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    Your lookin at approximately a cool 10 g's a year

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    You don't really need a stall just go transient but still expensive. Haul outs are usually just a trip to the grid once a year for bottom paint or just do it a few times a season and clorox the bottom clean. The big problem i see here is what do you do with the boat in the winter ?? Leave it in the water and worry about it all the time or do you stick it on the hard all winter and just have to worry about shoveling off the snow once in awhile, guess that depends on how much it snows where you store the boat. Why don't you think about a bigger boat that you can still trailer ?? You can go up to 11 wide for the tunnel though it will cost you more to go through ($300) the tunnel you'll save some in storage. If your looking at bigger glass boats please please stay away from outdrives go with outboards or even inboards. Get a good survey done by a GOOD surveyor or if your mechanical go through the whole boat yourself and i mean go through by putting on the coveralls and diving in & a small mirror on a stick along with a powerful flashlight goes a long way into seeing into places around corners and under things, spend the money for a quality moisture meter to look for wet/leaking/soaked cores in the topsides, hull, transom, stringers and anywhere that looks like it was covered by fiberglass. Then when your all done go hire that good surveyor and see what he comes up with. I've been around these holes in the water for a long time call me if you want to talk more or stop out to the potbarn i always have time to bs about boats. Oh one more thing don't listen to most of the stuff on the hull truth bunch of sea lawyers on there in my opinion.
    Oh this just hit me ?? ever thought of stretching what you have ???
    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Oh this just hit me ?? ever thought of stretching what you have ???
    Steve
    There are a few guys that I know of that have added 2-4' on their Pacific Cruisers. I don't know the cost, but I think its a pretty straight forward modification if you add it to the cockpit. Adding it to the house might be a different situation though.

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    I have a 31' Uniflite in Seward. With slip fee's and lift fee's at $250 per lift the cost isn't all that bad (I guess). Mine is on a trailer that I pull for the winter, but keep it in Seward still. Just to say I have a glass boat costs me about $4k per year. I would expect to pay 3 to 7k annually depending on how you manage it. Tell you what, wait a year and maybe we can swap out. LOL
    Tony

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    There are many unwelcome costs of a slip.
    I'm out

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    I'm glad I posted up and asked before diving in. That's quite a bit more then I was thinking. I figured the slip would be around $2K and then maybe double that for pulling it out and bottom painting it every other year. Sounds like I was way off.

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    You don't really need a stall just go transient but still expensive. Haul outs are usually just a trip to the grid once a year for bottom paint or just do it a few times a season and clorox the bottom clean. The big problem i see here is what do you do with the boat in the winter ?? Leave it in the water and worry about it all the time or do you stick it on the hard all winter and just have to worry about shoveling off the snow once in awhile, guess that depends on how much it snows where you store the boat. Why don't you think about a bigger boat that you can still trailer ?? You can go up to 11 wide for the tunnel though it will cost you more to go through ($300) the tunnel you'll save some in storage. If your looking at bigger glass boats please please stay away from outdrives go with outboards or even inboards. Get a good survey done by a GOOD surveyor or if your mechanical go through the whole boat yourself and i mean go through by putting on the coveralls and diving in & a small mirror on a stick along with a powerful flashlight goes a long way into seeing into places around corners and under things, spend the money for a quality moisture meter to look for wet/leaking/soaked cores in the topsides, hull, transom, stringers and anywhere that looks like it was covered by fiberglass. Then when your all done go hire that good surveyor and see what he comes up with. I've been around these holes in the water for a long time call me if you want to talk more or stop out to the potbarn i always have time to bs about boats. Oh one more thing don't listen to most of the stuff on the hull truth bunch of sea lawyers on there in my opinion.
    Oh this just hit me ?? ever thought of stretching what you have ???
    Steve
    Thanks Potbuilder and Ronster. I'd think about stretching it but it's the cabin that's really the issue. It's mainly just my family most the time so the fishing cockpit isn't really the issue. The issue is room to put our little kids to sleep so my beautiful wife and I can have some quiet time for a drink and enjoy the evening. While our cuddy is pretty big, it's not big enough to hang cots, similar to what Spoiled One does. We really need something with more cabin space in general a some sort of sleeping arrangement that would allow us to put the kids to bed early.

    After lots of looking around and talking with people, it's obvious I want to stay away from outdrives. I was ready to jump on a Seasport Pilot House with a KAD diesel but I'm glad I didn't. Too much cost and maintenance considering I'm use to owning outboards. Ideally we'd buy a Glaciercraft or Bayweld in the 30ft range with twin outboards but I just can't find one that fits the budget.

    Thanks again for all the help and keep the comments coming.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The other thing to consider is how you use your boat. Generally the 30+' glass boats are going to be cruising under 20 knots, and if you're used to cruising mid 20's in your current boat you're going to find that you'll be limited to areas closer to port for a weekend due to the difference in speed. So with the big boats I figure unless you're going to be going out for at least 3 days, if not 5-9 days they really limit where you can go, and if you can't get a slip in Whittier then that means Seward and out of Seward you don't have a huge selection of protected bays to explore within 20-30 miles of port.

    http://www.alaskaboatbrokers.com/lis...ail.php?id=187

    The engines have alot of hours on them and personally I'd want at least twin 200's, but it's a beautiful boat. Not sure if it's in your budget, but it's a nice boat for the $.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    Ideally we'd buy a Glaciercraft or Bayweld in the 30ft range with twin outboards but I just can't find one that fits the budget. Thanks again for all the help and keep the comments coming.
    PM sent.

    You can get a boat similar to the T-Rex with twin 150's, with trailer, for about $180K. Bayweld's, base model - standard features v-birth has two bunks in the cuddy. Start upgrading stuff and the price goes up. But, turn key, full featured, stay over night boat for a family of 4 - 6 will start at about $169K, add a 10K trailer and you're at about $180K.

    http://bayweldboats.com/services/new...v-birth-cabin/

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    The Bayweld T-Rex is now our slip neighbor in Juneau but it has twin Yamaha F200s. If you are looking at a bigger boat and concerned about cost consider this... Yes slips and moorage cost a lot. Most recreational boats sink at the dock. Not only do you have to pay for the slip you have to pay for the electricity. You have to shovel the boat in winter. Our 36' Navigator has 3 heaters in it for the winter. Our previous 31' Uniflite had 2 heaters but the engines after 17 years looked new because the engine room always had heat. Compared to the price of a 30' Aluminum cruiser, our 20 year old 36' Navigator with low hour twin volvo diesels was less than half the price of a new Hewescraft 260 Pacific Explorer, and it is 3x the boat at 36'x12' with twin staterooms, and a flybridge with seating for 6. It was 1/3 the cost of the suggested Bayweld. The cost difference of $115,000 buys a lot of moorage and fuel. We cruise at 17knots and are getting about 1.2 nmpg.

    Oh yea, forgot to mention that it is awesome to quickly drive down to the boat in Juneau and not have to hassle with hooking up the trailer, and dealing with yahoos at the launch ramp (both coming and going).

    Sobie2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    The other thing to consider is how you use your boat. Generally the 30+' glass boats are going to be cruising under 20 knots, and if you're used to cruising mid 20's in your current boat you're going to find that you'll be limited to areas closer to port for a weekend due to the difference in speed. So with the big boats I figure unless you're going to be going out for at least 3 days, if not 5-9 days they really limit where you can go, and if you can't get a slip in Whittier then that means Seward and out of Seward you don't have a huge selection of protected bays to explore within 20-30 miles of port.

    http://www.alaskaboatbrokers.com/lis...ail.php?id=187

    The engines have alot of hours on them and personally I'd want at least twin 200's, but it's a beautiful boat. Not sure if it's in your budget, but it's a nice boat for the $.
    Buddy of mine has a 32' 15 knot max, boat that is not trailerable. He had a slip in Seward because it was affordable compared to the wait at Whittier and price for Cliffside Harbor. He had it there 1 year and decided that Seward/Resurection Bay for a "slow" boat was not cutting it. He ended up buying a slip in Cliffside.

    Paul H has a point. For a slower boat Whittier offers more access to more areas within 20-30 miles. Also, if you have a big boat that you can trailer at least out of the water then I think Whittier offers permanent parking spaces for an annual fee. You get the boat through the tunnel once or sail it from whereever and then leave it in Whittier, but it's not sitting in the salt 24/7. You store it on a trailer in a parking space. I notice that the parking spaces thin out in the winter so most guys that do this must pull their boat for the winter and store it someplace that doesn't get as much snow, but if you didn't want to do that you'd just need to contract with someone to keep the boat shoveled off or check on it every couple of weeks.

    To go through the tunnel a boat that is up to 10' wide is $35. 10'+ to 10'6" is $125. Anything over 10'6" you need a pilot car to tow it on the highway and the price at the tunnel is like $300.

    From what you've shared so far, if you can find a trailerable boat that does not exceed 10'6" then you can trailer it to Whittier at the beginning of the season, pay a parking fee for April through Oct, your boat is parked in Whittier for the boating season and then trailer it back to your house to store for the winter.

    http://www.dot.state.ak.us/creg/whit...el/tolls.shtml

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    The Bayweld T-Rex is now our slip neighbor in Juneau but it has twin Yamaha F200s. Sobie2
    This is correct. However, what I was trying to say is that Bay Weld's base model, V-birth boat comes standard with twin 150's for $170K without a trailer. I know the owner of the T-Rex and his build is very close to standard features, a couple of his upgrades are the twin 200's and the aft helm steering station, and maybe a couple other things that are not visually noticeable in the pics.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Having some one shovel your boat off during the winter could be a bad idea. They don't shovel carefully like the owner would. A friend found out the hard way in Seward when spring came. He had broken equipment and aluminum shovel marks all over his fiberglass.
    Which meant he had lots of work to do in the spring instead of boating, and he had to make trips in the winter just to shovel it off after that, it was a year round chore.
    BK

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replys. The more you guys talk about it the more I think just moving up to a bigger trailer-able boat with twin outboards is the way to go. Problem is, a boat that will fit our family is probably going to be a 28-30ft and is going to run us $150K or more. I've presented numbers to the CFO this morning so we'll see what her reaction is. We've been talking about this for more than 2 years now and with the addition of second boy to our family, it comes up more and more often.

    What Sobie2 talks about is why we started thinking about it getting a "BIG BOAT'. The additional space, the perks of slipping it and not having to haul it and deal with the launch. If I could get a slip in Whittier we might do it but all the points about Seward that people brought up is one big reason we're still leaning towards a trailer-able boat.

    I sure do like those Baywelds so thanks 1S1K for the info. Ideally we'd be looking for something like that or a Glaciercraft for our next boat.

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    The same conclusion I came to a few years back when I started to look into glass boats in the 32-36' range. You can get alot of boat for the $, but the only port I'd consider for that type of boat is Whittier, and I could either buy a slip at Cliffside and have no money for a boat or wait for a decade for a slip.

    But I've managed with a family of five in a 22' boat, and boat funds lately have been going to college tuitition. Somehow boating seems cheep in comparison.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    The same conclusion I came to a few years back when I started to look into glass boats in the 32-36' range. You can get alot of boat for the $, but the only port I'd consider for that type of boat is Whittier, and I could either buy a slip at Cliffside and have no money for a boat or wait for a decade for a slip.

    But I've managed with a family of five in a 22' boat, and boat funds lately have been going to college tuitition. Somehow boating seems cheep in comparison.
    Ha! Good point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    Thanks for all the replys. The more you guys talk about it the more I think just moving up to a bigger trailer-able boat with twin outboards is the way to go. Problem is, a boat that will fit our family is probably going to be a 28-30ft and is going to run us $150K or more. I've presented numbers to the CFO this morning so we'll see what her reaction is. We've been talking about this for more than 2 years now and with the addition of second boy to our family, it comes up more and more often.

    What Sobie2 talks about is why we started thinking about it getting a "BIG BOAT'. The additional space, the perks of slipping it and not having to haul it and deal with the launch. If I could get a slip in Whittier we might do it but all the points about Seward that people brought up is one big reason we're still leaning towards a trailer-able boat.

    I sure do like those Baywelds so thanks 1S1K for the info. Ideally we'd be looking for something like that or a Glaciercraft for our next boat.
    Don't forget about the burglars in the habor office nicking you for whittier personal property tax !!

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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Don't forget about the burglars in the habor office nicking you for whittier personal property tax !!
    I think most of the public harbors assess this tax. Also you need a season parking pass, $225 + booklet of tunnel passes, $225. Depending on your boat's value these 3 alone could be $1K.

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