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Thread: Pattern work at PABV

  1. #1
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    Default Pattern work at PABV

    Monday afternoon I was working on touch n go's with my instructor and things were going great.. On one of the last few I made my call for a turn to left final for 2L touch n go's and proceeded to stay in the pattern. Well on my climb out I spot a yellow cub buzzing he tops of the trees on the north end of the field and less that 1500' away. He calls on the radio that I should have been calling my departure.. At this point I'm thinking this guy is crazy. He is flying way inside standard pattern distances at an elevation of maybe 100' agl yes 100' My instructor agreed with me that our call was correct and that this guy is just another "alaskan flyer" Looked dumb to me for the guy to enter the pattern in such a manner without ever calling CTAF and then to jump on the radio to say I should be telling him about my departure.

    My standard pattern for BCV is turn crosswind at 500 msl 1/4 - 1/2 mile turn downwind max altitude 1200 msl.

    Was this a normal occurrence? Am I the one that should have done something different? Are straight in approaches the norm? Please let me know your thoughts... It was a bit unsettling.


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  2. #2
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    You did everything right, don't worry. You will run across guys like that on occasion but most are not like that. Seems some can't make the transition from no one around on bush strips to playing with others around airports.

  3. #3
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    Everything right? Calling ready to turn final for a touch and go? Is it reasonable to think the Cub might expect a short final T&G or departing the runway/remaining in the pattern call? I'd bet both parties had an expectation of what they'd see and both parties were surprised when something different appeared. There's no law that small planes have radios or use radios in that airspace. Or that the other guy's radio works as well as yours, or that he wasn't on AWOS at the moment you made your position report. Your instructor should have reinforced that the only one watching out for your safety is you. Keep your eyes open. The next unexpected airplane you come across may be closer.

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    The real world! Anticipate to experience everything except what is encouraged in the AIM. Be professional and follow the rules to mitigate risk. I contend that the greatest risk I face when flying is a mid-air collision.

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    NO LOSS

    Navigate Outside.....Look, See, and be Seen....

    Birchwood has the ski strip down at one end so you see all sorts of weird stuff.

    Always assume that somebody else will be in your airspace and they have no idea where you are......


    The windshield and windows are your primary instrument.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6

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    You did make the proper call. He might not have heard it. He may have make a call you did not hear. You see a lot of guys doing straight in from the North, keeps you off the water. If I don't hear much traffic on approach that is how I tend to do it. If it sounds like there are a few planes in pattern I like to cross over midfield from the East and get a look at everyone. Remember we have helicopters and ultra lite aircraft using mountain side of airfield also. You will see people landing from the south in the afternoon even with a tailwind to keep the sun behind them on final. You will learn to take it all in stride, and think about why they come in the way they do. There is a ton of traffic here and in the valley keep your eyes outside the plane. Always look out for the unexpected.
    DENNY

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys. I appreciate the comments and suggestions. I will continue to fly the plane and check the instruments.

    Had an R44 sharing the pattern with me and a few other planes as well. It was a great day to be flying.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    I am at PAVB and I think I have seen it all, probably one of the most busy non-tower airports in Alaska, especially with ski / dirt strip, I always take my time there and look around a lot. FBO'a from Anchorage and perhaps military flying clubs use the airport a lot because students do not have to deal with the "TOWER" just them and the instructor .... tons of Helo ops as well. Keep your head on a swivel...

  9. #9
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Mr.Pid, just got back to the computer, I was guessing the instructor or student made the final 2L touch and go call, and was just trying to reassure a early student not to worry. Maybe you could enlighten us where the calls you said should be made might be found. It's been my understanding making a call , while in the pattern turning final, touch and go served two purposes:1. Let people know you were on final and intended to continue in the pattern with a touch and go. 2. Students and pilots would not have to make radio calls on short final and while reconfig. The plane and taking off.
    Now that said, right or wrong, all this is found in AIM, Jeps training books etc. here on the internet we as a group shouldn't be correcting a CFI's actions or giving instruction to a new student. We weren't in the plane and there , we all know, are so many variables that change the game. My intent, encourage and support students, we need them if we want a future for aviation .

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