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Thread: Mtn goat troll

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    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default Mtn goat troll

    We trolled up a nice nanny, and a little king! On our way out to the trolling grounds we spotted 9 Mtn goats on a cliff only about 200ft up, then I spotted this gal 20ft from the shore, I swear she was digging clams.
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    That's impressive to me,.. Don't usually get dem billies out in one piece,.. cheers!

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    Member BRWHUNTER's Avatar
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    Kodiakcombo your goat hunts are always so interesting, that hunts the one I've been looking for for my father, Kings and Beach Goats. Awesome!

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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Both Goat hunts I've been on have been the most challenging of all the hunts I've been on in Alaska. Both were filled with the joy of being on top of mountains, the terror of almost falling off of those mountains, and the extreme sense of accomplishment of coming down with goat meat in my pack. Now I understand why the regulations changed so Goats could be hunted through March. I also understand how it's a plus for individuals to get additional meat during the winter months. The sad thing now though is as they come down low during the winter months they can be picked off from the beach! Man, I should probably bite my tongue, and I've always appreciated your posts Jeff, but I can't help but feel like this new regulation will open the flood gates for guys to take the easy way to harvesting such a challenging, regal mountain animal by means of a short cut. If ADF&G needs them harvested so bad maybe allowing the use of helicopters could be an avenue for them to consider. I do apologize sincerely for muddying up your thread but I just feel it's a shame that the animals that live on the very top of Kodiak's peaks can now be shot from the beach.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakcombo View Post
    We trolled up a nice nanny, and a little king! On our way out to the trolling grounds we spotted 9 Mtn goats on a cliff only about 200ft up, then I spotted this gal 20ft from the shore, I swear she was digging clams.
    Awesome congrats Jeff!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by CGSwimmer25 View Post
    Both Goat hunts I've been on have been the most challenging of all the hunts I've been on in Alaska. Both were filled with the joy of being on top of mountains, the terror of almost falling off of those mountains, and the extreme sense of accomplishment of coming down with goat meat in my pack. Now I understand why the regulations changed so Goats could be hunted through March. I also understand how it's a plus for individuals to get additional meat during the winter months. The sad thing now though is as they come down low during the winter months they can be picked off from the beach! Man, I should probably bite my tongue, and I've always appreciated your posts Jeff, but I can't help but feel like this new regulation will open the flood gates for guys to take the easy way to harvesting such a challenging, regal mountain animal by means of a short cut. If ADF&G needs them harvested so bad maybe allowing the use of helicopters could be an avenue for them to consider. I do apologize sincerely for muddying up your thread but I just feel it's a shame that the animals that live on the very top of Kodiak's peaks can now be shot from the beach.
    No disrespect meant but to suggest to open the flood gates to helicopter hunting for ANYTHING in the state of Alaska is simply a misguided statement and thought. :-)

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    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGSwimmer25 View Post
    Both Goat hunts I've been on have been the most challenging of all the hunts I've been on in Alaska. Both were filled with the joy of being on top of mountains, the terror of almost falling off of those mountains, and the extreme sense of accomplishment of coming down with goat meat in my pack. Now I understand why the regulations changed so Goats could be hunted through March. I also understand how it's a plus for individuals to get additional meat during the winter months. The sad thing now though is as they come down low during the winter months they can be picked off from the beach! Man, I should probably bite my tongue, and I've always appreciated your posts Jeff, but I can't help but feel like this new regulation will open the flood gates for guys to take the easy way to harvesting such a challenging, regal mountain animal by means of a short cut. If ADF&G needs them harvested so bad maybe allowing the use of helicopters could be an avenue for them to consider. I do apologize sincerely for muddying up your thread but I just feel it's a shame that the animals that live on the very top of Kodiak's peaks can now be shot from the beach.
    I bit my tongue!
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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    CGSwimmer25, plus 1 to what you said. Ethics my lad,ethics.

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    Many years ago ... I successfully hunted goat out of Seward, Cordova, McCarthy, Kenai, and Chickaloon. All in nasty brush, scary cliffs and horrible pack outs. The goat hunt story that is most often told is landing the Cub on Johnstone Bay beach on a frigid November evening ... making a siwash camp in the trees ... freezing through the night ... climbing through alders, devils clubs and over slick boulders and downfall ... nothing ...descending following the same nasty trail ... spotting a young billy on the beach within a hundred yards of the Cub ... going home with fresh goat. Doesn't matter the altitude or the trail ... a goat hunt is a goat hunt.

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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    After every goat hunt I've been on I have asked why am I doing this.They always have to be in country a man is not built to walk in.So in the next 13 days and we spot a goat on the beach I still don't see we're Ethics come in here?He is either gonna have a arrow in him or a bullet from my hunting partners!A dead goat is a dead goat no matter what altitude.Maybe this might be the first hunt I don't ask myself what am I doing on this cliff...But I doubt it I'm not that lucky!

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    In August you climb to the top of a devils club infested mountain to chase Sitka deer. In December you can shoot them from the beach. Is the beach hunter any less ethical than the climber. Absolutely not.

    Keep up with the posts Jeff.
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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Cg I think this isn't a matter of changing regulations, there are easier ways to do everything. But if you feel some guilt or conscience issue with shooting goats on the beach then simply just choose not to be a part of that activity. For some it will feel like they almost deserve it from years of climbing and no goat. Others just easy meat. Part of hunting is takin a animal in its natural habitat, goats come down and get shot, so do deer, and moose as well.
    Nothing wrong with not liking it, I understand what your saying. Just a matter of choice....
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Cg I think this isn't a matter of changing regulations, there are easier ways to do everything. But if you feel some guilt or conscience issue with shooting goats on the beach then simply just choose not to be a part of that activity. For some it will feel like they almost deserve it from years of climbing and no goat. Others just easy meat. Part of hunting is takin a animal in its natural habitat, goats come down and get shot, so do deer, and moose as well.
    Nothing wrong with not liking it, I understand what your saying. Just a matter of choice....
    Totally agree......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Well, I for one wouldn't hesitate to shoot one on the beach. I had an unsuccessful goat hunt this past fall and it was painful...

  15. #15

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    I would never hold a beach goat against anyone - I've been through several painful experiences this past year goat hunting. Just like h20fowler said I wouldn't hesitate.

    However, there is a true appreciation and respect to be gained from hunting the goats in their natural habitat. I would take a first timer and beat them up a bit on the cliffs before letting them have that "easy" goat and I'm 100% positive this was not the first goat Kodiakcombo has harvested.

    All this being said - Gorgeous goat kodiakcombo. Keep them coming!

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    That's on my list to do, Kodiak Goat.

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    When I found out that I was going to have an opportunity to hunt goats with Mossyhorn this year I was talking to a fellow worker. He has pix of nice billies on the wall in his office - so I was looking to hear some good stories and get some motivation to workout and prep for the hunt.

    He told me - ah, just drive the boat up next to em and pop em and then flip em over into my boat. He hunts the draws out of seward.

    I would be more than happy tagging a goat that way - as the meat is fantastic; however, I am very glad that I got to experience goat hunting on different terms.

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    I disagree with CGSwimmer on the helo hunting, but agree that shooting a goat on the beach is less of a "trophy" (to me) than going through hell to get up high and take one there. I see what he is saying, but as stated earlier, meat is important and a goat in the boat (I just made that up) would be a good feeling. If the population can handle winter beach hunts, there is no reason that residents who need the winter meat should not be allowed to hunt that way.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Is a fall brown bear shot off a salmon stream any less of a trophy than a spring one that you have to bust your tail though snow to get? How about a moose close to the rut vs. one shot in early September?
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    I can only answer for myself, but I do think the work it takes to harvest an animal is directly related to the level meaningfulness of that experience. I think "trophy" is a subjective term. Speaking for myself, I would hold a smaller animal taken through much toil in higher esteem than a larger animal that stumbled into my camp.
    That being said, I would shoot either one and enjoy every bite of it. I just love to tell a good story and think that blood and sweat make for a good story. I am also 28 and have been accused of "having a strong back and a weak mind." When I am ready for retirement, I will likely look back and think about how young and dumb I was.

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