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Thread: 20 yard arrow drop off

  1. #1

    Default 20 yard arrow drop off

    Hi,

    I have a samick sage 50# recurve bow. I notice a drop off in the arrow at just 20 yards. However, if I draw more I can sometimes seem to create negligible drop off. Is this normal? Thank you. No issues at 10 yards. Shooting instinctive without sights.

  2. #2

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    To be consistent and develop accuracy you have to draw the same every time. Same draw length, same anchor, use your back and not your arms or shoulder. Your mind will adjust to the yardage the same way you learn to hit a catchers mitt from the pitchers mound or second base. You look at the pocket of the mitt and throw. Pick a small spot on the target and focus on that spot whether it 10, 20 or 30 yards. Don't think in terms of yardage just concentrate on the spot.

  3. #3

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    Thanks I have been doing that with good success at 10 yards. But I guess at 20 I need to keep at it till I make a natural correction for the yardage? Is it normal to have to shoot higher? I notice my arrow going towards the point of aim and then dropping off last second...

  4. #4
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Yup, physics. You will have to deal with it or get a higher poundage bow that will increase your feet per second.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunterwannabe View Post
    Thanks I have been doing that with good success at 10 yards. But I guess at 20 I need to keep at it till I make a natural correction for the yardage? Is it normal to have to shoot higher? I notice my arrow going towards the point of aim and then dropping off last second...
    Point of aim is a technique and its not instinctive. It's more akin to using a sight. If you're looking at the arrow then your not concentrating on a spot on the target. You can also develop a bad habit of dropping your bow arm to look at the arrow after the release. If you don't force yourself to pick a spot then you'll shoot right over the animal in a hunting situation. The old say, aim big miss big, aim small miss small applies here. In other words, if you aim at the target then your group will be all over the target. If you concentrate on the last little arrow hole in the target then your group will begin to tighten around that little hole. 50 pounds is plenty bow to learn with and will kill anything in Alaska with the proper arrow at close range. Feet per second is irrelevant with instinctive shooting. I'm shooting 750-800 grain arrows from a 53# longbow right now and I don't see arrow drop at 20 yards because I'm not looking at the arrow. There is a noticeable arc at 30 yards with a heavy arrow but you still don't think "aim higher". You pick a spot and concentrate on that little spot the same way you did at at 10 or 20. With practice, your brain learns to adjust like it does shooting a basketball from inside the lane or at the top of the key, you'll hit the spot. That's also why you don't see every b-ball player shooting from the top of the key. It takes a lot of practice. It also takes practice finding a shot close in but that's the what makes it a sport. A good way to practice is to pick random places to shoot from without yardage mark references or counting steps. Same as a game of Horse in b-ball. You won't have yardage marks in a hunting situation so remove them from your practice.

  6. #6
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    What Bo said. I found the best practice was to grab a couple of judo tips and go stump thumpin in the woods. And make sure you do lots of practice on a hillside. All last summer I walked up the mountain behnd my shop everyday at lunch shooting uphill and then back down. I watched guys with compunds and range finders miss the first target in my archery cert last year, they aimed for what they're range finder said, had no idea how to shoot uphill and missed both times.

  7. #7

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    thanks guys this has been very very helpful so far for a beginner like me. 20 yards was a good down to earth moment for me after I felt like robin Hood at 10 yards. shooting in the woods sounds like a good idea as well. I am suspecting my release is not great either as I find myself plucking at times.

  8. #8
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    A 50 pound bow should be sending arrows to 20 yards quite nicely. Not flat, but the arc should be relatively small.

    Can you provide more details about your equipment. Draw length, arrow type, arrow weight, release type such as a tab or glove.

    Based on my own experience when a kid, it sounds like you might not be drawing the bow back enough to reach the draw poundage. I was a small kid with a large light long bow and the arrows just kind of flopped. Switched to a short 45# recurve and managed to get normal performance out of my gear.

  9. #9

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    there's too many variables to say anything about arrow drop honestly. 50lbs with a 30" draw is a far cry to a guy shooting a 50lb bow with a b50 string, drawing 25"es or really short drawing half that (but for whatever reason they think they're at full draw), shooting rebar stakes for arrows, extremely heavy front ends will make an arrow drop fast also etc etc etc.

    not all 50lb bows are created equal, some are not even close! Some do surprisingly well. Throw a parachute for fletching on the end of a poorly tuned bow that has any of the other variables thrown in and you can expect it to fly like a rock lol. it will do the job for sure, but don't expect it to be a lazer guided missle.

    Drop is all relative to what you're used too. If a guys hanging out with wheel bow guys, just forget looking at that arc, there's no comparison. Now throw in super light arrows etc and they'll cook right along. It makes that 180ish fps or less really look like a turtle in flight.

    If you're new, there's a simple way to get on quick. 3 under works like magic. Its a little harder at distance to get, but you'll see what I mean.

    There's a ton of ideas on shooting from no reference to all kinds of references. There are very very few really good stinctors. Most fall into some form of point of aim/gap to not paying any attention to the gap/point over time. Neither are true instinctive but honestly who really cares if it helps you shoot well! None are wrong and they all work. Take the time to learn one! instinctive by itself takes the longest to get the grip on.

    Bob Wesley has a pretty decent video, Byron Ferguson does also, they're using references similar to Hill and many of the other greats. Asbells videos are instinctive and are a great watch also.



    I will add that when I'm really humming, which with the lack of shooting I've been doing lately its been awhile, I really notice the sight picture. I don't mentally account for it, but I see it without question. My shooting goes to He!! when I start focusing on it. Its hard to explain and harder to learn. Welcome to the joys of traditional gear!

  10. #10
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    I'm a longbow nut, and have been since 1950. I've tried any number of recurve bows, but am still unable to maintain consistent accuracy with one. When Howard Hill was asked why he preferred a longbow, he replied that it was because he simply couldn't shoot a recurve with any accuracy. As for true instinctive shooting, I'd highly recommend Hill's book, "Hunting the Hard Way". It covers every piece of traditional equipment, as well as a understandable explanation of "instinctive" shooting.

    Hill took almost every one of the world's big game animals, including African lions and elephants. He entered 196 archery tournaments, and won every one of them. His authoritative book is well worth the trouble to locate and read it.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I like Fred Asbell's books as well......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    maybe your arrows are too heavy for your actual draw weight. are you drawing exactly 28 inches on a 50# bow or less? you prob know this but your only getting 50 if your drawing 28" and that is still +/- a couple lbs. if your drawing 26 inches and have a telephone pole with a 200 gr tip on it then its probably dropping like a rock. if you dont want to deal with so much arc you can go lighter (carbon) but make sure you dont get too light. might void a warranty and wreck your bow. Im at around 8.25 grains per lb of draw (kind of light for a recurve many perfer 10gpp) any lighter i get a bunch of vibration hand shock and poor arrow flight.

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