Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Tourists

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default Tourists

    Hi guys
    A few mates and myself are heading back to Ak this summer for some of the best fishing in the world. Our few weeks fishing camping holiday usually consists of a night out in anchorage then store up on gear and food then hit the road, fishing our way down the kenai peninsula to homer for a cople days halibut charter and a day fishing the beach for butts then work our way back north for the reds, last year we went as far north as talkeetna. This year we have been thinking about a charter for salmon shark, can anyone suggest any successful charter skippers that target shark in the peninsula.
    Thank you for any replys in advance

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    267

    Default

    I recommend that you skip the salmon shark charter. We used to have great salmon shark fishing out of Seward or Valdez but since about 2009 or so the shark fishing has gotten so slow that it isn't worth the effort in my opinion. To the best of my knowledge no charters in Valdez even offer shark trips anymore. Someone in Seward might offer trips but I wouldn't hold high hopes for success. I recommend that you add an extra halibut day or go salmon fishing.

  3. #3
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    Here is an alternative to fishing for salmon sharks: scuba diving with an experienced outfit to see sharks up close. Don't worry, they won't bite you and are actually shy! But I think you have to bring your own scuba gear and for sure at least be experienced. Also do photo tours---and fishing, they used to guide for salmon shark fishing and possibly still do that. It can take all day to get one to hit, as I recall, even when they are plentiful. Anyway, check out www.ravencroftlodge.com. Boone Hodgin is the owner/operator along with his wife and parents. Might be the good new adventure you are looking for!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Thanks for the heads up safari, will forget about the shark trip, have seen a few shark fotos posted and presumed it was a steady fishery, with only limited fishing time we cant aford much blankers. Any reason why the shark fishing has slowed down in the last few years?

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Thanks ron, checked out the lodge, it looks well set up and the remote location is appealing, none of us have any dive gear or paddy certs but have dived before, it looks stunning. We will be traveling by rv so be on the move all the time. Maybe give the lodge a try if i ever come back over with the wife and kids...cheers

  6. #6
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salty nuts View Post
    Thanks for the heads up safari, will forget about the shark trip, have seen a few shark fotos posted and presumed it was a steady fishery, with only limited fishing time we cant aford much blankers. Any reason why the shark fishing has slowed down in the last few years?
    The charters cleaned them up pretty good.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  7. #7
    Sponsor offshore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Last year I spoke to Ken Goldman at ADF&G. His answer to "where did all of the sharks go" was that they really couldn't contribute the disappearance to one factor, but it's likely that a combination of fishing pressure, movement pattern changes, and salmon run changes likely led to the decline of shark numbers in places where they used to be very high... I agree that charterboat pressure increased exponentially through the late 90s and early to mid 2000s. I'm also certain that private boaters and the hundreds of gillnetters and seiners also took their toll on them. It would be pretty tough to get one out of a net in good shape. As for sportfishing, the problem I saw was that salmon sharks spin and can be difficult to land when on a line. If you weren't good at catching them, or if you just had bad luck, you could easily hook and break off a large number of sharks which would be spun up in the leader. I think latent mortality from lost and even sharks thought to be released cleanly, was high. As salmon sharks generate impressive heat when exerting themselves, it is possible that they would effectively give themselves heart attacks when on the line too long. This could be minimized by using proper fighting and release tactics, and with the use of single circle hooks and mono leaders. Unfortunately, most who fished back then had no knowledge of any of this and used steel cable and j hooks. Common sense suggested that a decline would come eventually given shark life history. There was quite a bit of research that took place during the later years of the high, but I have found none which addresses the decline. I had support from private researchers in Anchorage, at Queens University, and ADF&G in 2000 for this project, www.fishwhittier.com/ASRI, but for whatever reason, couldn't find anyone interested enough to fund it. Whether you thought the "shark explosion" was for better or for worse, it was definately an amazing phenomenon that I think should have had a little more attention by managers at the time.

  8. #8
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by offshore View Post
    Last year I spoke to Ken Goldman at ADF&G. His answer to "where did all of the sharks go" was that they really couldn't contribute the disappearance to one factor, but it's likely that a combination of fishing pressure, movement pattern changes, and salmon run changes likely led to the decline of shark numbers in places where they used to be very high... I agree that charterboat pressure increased exponentially through the late 90s and early to mid 2000s. I'm also certain that private boaters and the hundreds of gillnetters and seiners also took their toll on them. It would be pretty tough to get one out of a net in good shape. As for sportfishing, the problem I saw was that salmon sharks spin and can be difficult to land when on a line. If you weren't good at catching them, or if you just had bad luck, you could easily hook and break off a large number of sharks which would be spun up in the leader. I think latent mortality from lost and even sharks thought to be released cleanly, was high. As salmon sharks generate impressive heat when exerting themselves, it is possible that they would effectively give themselves heart attacks when on the line too long. This could be minimized by using proper fighting and release tactics, and with the use of single circle hooks and mono leaders. Unfortunately, most who fished back then had no knowledge of any of this and used steel cable and j hooks. Common sense suggested that a decline would come eventually given shark life history. There was quite a bit of research that took place during the later years of the high, but I have found none which addresses the decline. I had support from private researchers in Anchorage, at Queens University, and ADF&G in 2000 for this project, www.fishwhittier.com/ASRI, but for whatever reason, couldn't find anyone interested enough to fund it. Whether you thought the "shark explosion" was for better or for worse, it was definately an amazing phenomenon that I think should have had a little more attention by managers at the time.
    The gillnetters and seiners were always there and did catch their share, when i gillnetted if you saw the shark hit the net you could tow the net tight and in most cases the shark would come out, i would think in a seine they could be rolled or brailed out. The charters in my opinion smelt the blood in the water (lets go catch a shark) and catered to the public to go kill'em and by creating that fishery caught & killed a lot of sharks that would have survived. OK answer me this dumb question once all the hero pictures were taken what happened to most of those sharks caugth by charters ?? I doubt many were eaten ?? Guess either they had head mounts done or they were dumped ??? I know none were saved by the com fleet. Unfortunately there was a huge waste in all fisheries of those sharks.
    In my opinion most of the fish "managers" are WAY BEHIND the curve when it comes to knowing whats really going on in most fisheries and they never listen to the folks who are out there fishing every day and thats for both the com, rec and charter fisheries. Their jobs will always be there no matter if a fishery prospers or crashes its all us peons that take it in the shorts.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  9. #9
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    Salmon shark is reported to be the best eating shark of all, and the two charters I knew that went for sharks rarely lost one when hooked, and their clients at least intended to eat them, and I know for a fact that at some of them did...let's hope so. I counted 28 salmon sharks promenading for hours together one evening in 2000, all looked like a choreographed show. I believe there are some solid research studies going on now to learn more about conservation of this species and other sharks.

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    Salmon shark is reported to be the best eating shark of all, and the two charters I knew that went for sharks rarely lost one when hooked, and their clients at least intended to eat them, and I know for a fact that at some of them did...let's hope so. I counted 28 salmon sharks promenading for hours together one evening in 2000, all looked like a choreographed show. I believe there are some solid research studies going on now to learn more about conservation of this species and other sharks.
    they were trying to make baby sharks !!!

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  11. #11
    Sponsor offshore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    We only kept sharks when they were wanted for the table. I think they are ok, but some people loved them and came back for more year after year. They have to be bled, gutted, and iced very soon after being landed. Interest waned because of the decreased success and the realization that salmon sharks are pretty high in mercury. I'm glad to hear that they can be released from a net fairly easily. Over the years, I ran across many fisherman on the docks that suggested otherwise and that I should get rid of as many as possible. I wouldn't say that charters "smelt blood in the water". For me, it was an exciting fishery—an interesting diversion from the unknown future of the halibut fishery and an alternative from the relatively short and small coho runs of late in the western Sound. It was a healthy fishery early on. I would have liked to have seen it managed proactively and conservatively- especially since such a large percentage of the sharks in the Sound were known to be breeding aged females. On the other hand, there are those who will argue that the increase was merely a blip in a natural cycle and that fishing pressure didn’t much matter. Regardless, it was the same story in Seward a few years before.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Id presumed it was a sustainable fishery after seing some fotos of salmon shark on the docks.
    To catch and land a shark on rod and line would take a fair bit of skill and balls, which would appeal to many sport fishers or recreational anglers as they are know over here.
    Im a commercial fisherman and all species of shark around the uk was put on the endagered list a few years ago and are now banned from being landed into fish markets,i dont know of any study being puplicised re the shark ban. The recreational angler may catch and release shark but through strict rules. Portbeagle,blue and mako along with the 5 mini species are the sharks around our waters, it would have been nice to have a hook up but as OP mentions it could be a strugle in more ways than one. Looks like its a halibut charter instead, was out with scott on the mako out of homer on all 3 of our last trips over to AK and limited out on decent fish. Do you guys know if he is still running trips this year. Cheers.

  13. #13
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salty nuts View Post
    Id presumed it was a sustainable fishery after seing some fotos of salmon shark on the docks.
    To catch and land a shark on rod and line would take a fair bit of skill and balls, which would appeal to many sport fishers or recreational anglers as they are know over here.
    Im a commercial fisherman and all species of shark around the uk was put on the endagered list a few years ago and are now banned from being landed into fish markets,i dont know of any study being puplicised re the shark ban. The recreational angler may catch and release shark but through strict rules. Portbeagle,blue and mako along with the 5 mini species are the sharks around our waters, it would have been nice to have a hook up but as OP mentions it could be a strugle in more ways than one. Looks like its a halibut charter instead, was out with scott on the mako out of homer on all 3 of our last trips over to AK and limited out on decent fish. Do you guys know if he is still running trips this year. Cheers.
    Salty if you haven't figured it out yet i am a commercial fisherman, 43 years worth, i tried to pm you but you don't have a email address i have a couple of questions about english gillnet haulers i'd like to ask you about. If you can pm me a way to contact you.
    Steve

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Salty if you haven't figured it out yet i am a commercial fisherman, 43 years worth, i tried to pm you but you don't have a email address i have a couple of questions about english gillnet haulers i'd like to ask you about. If you can pm me a way to contact you.
    Steve
    Hi steve, you must have salt in the blood fishing for that long lol.
    i think i know what the prob is, i never returned the confirmation email when i joined in 2011, that email is lost now but ill leave a message with forum mods to get new confirmation. I dont get certain privliges, ie, pm wont work. Once set up properly ill pm email etc. gill netters are not so common up here in scotland, mostly down in the english channel. Inshore and offshore wreck fishing mostly, our line of work up here is single,twin and quad trawl, i know a guy that fishes the channel,so if i can help in anyway

  15. #15
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salty nuts View Post
    Hi steve, you must have salt in the blood fishing for that long lol.
    i think i know what the prob is, i never returned the confirmation email when i joined in 2011, that email is lost now but ill leave a message with forum mods to get new confirmation. I dont get certain privliges, ie, pm wont work. Once set up properly ill pm email etc. gill netters are not so common up here in scotland, mostly down in the english channel. Inshore and offshore wreck fishing mostly, our line of work up here is single,twin and quad trawl, i know a guy that fishes the channel,so if i can help in anyway
    Ok Salty pm me when you get straightened out. I've never heard of a quad trawl ?? 4 nets on one set of doors ?? that must a interesting gob of gear to set out !! Hey bring a small trawl with ya and i guarantee one or two passes in the kenai and you boys would have all the kings you'd want, i bet there are quite a few of them rolling around on the bottom of the river after the catch and release guys get done with them !!(let the blood letting begin !!)

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quad, ye its 1 centre clump and 2 sets of doors,4 small trawl nets, an absalute nightmare to shoot but it works. Ok steve dropped brian m a visitors message yesterday so might get pm sorted soon. Cheers

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I believe you have to have 25 posts and have been a member for a month before the PM function is activated.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    The charters cleaned them up pretty good.
    Steve,

    i certainly have no proof but I don't believe the charters were to blame for the decrease in sharks. I base this on the following info. I fished for sharks 6 years in a row on a charter out of Valdez. It was a 6 pack boat. Trip one we landed 12 sharks and kept 3, trip 2 we landed 15 sharks and kept 2, trip 3 we landed 18 sharks and kept 1, trip 4 we landed 15 sharks and kept 1. Trip 5 we landed 2 sharks and kept 0. Trip 6 we never even got a bite. I may be off on my years plus or minus one but I believe we started fishing in 2005 and had great success through 2008. During those trips we saw many many sharks finning the water while we were fishing. In 2009 and 2010 we had the bad fishing years and I haven't went out after sharks since then but I suspect the fishing still sucks since I rarely see any finning even though I spend 4-8 days halibut fishing the area each year. All the sharks we kept were 100 percent consumed by us. None was wasted or fed to pets. The reason I believe that charters aren't to blame for the shark crash is how the fishery went from outstanding to nonexistent in a single year. I have no proof but I suspect the sharks simply moved somewhere else. Adfg were tagging sharks 2 years when I fished them and they told us that they were doing the tagging study because virtually nothing was known at that time about salmon sharks. I have no idea how accurate that statement is/was but that is what we were told by adfg.

  19. #19
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    1,126

    Default

    They disappeared not just from the sound, but in places where they were never fished for. There were two spots that we could go to and watch them come the boat and eat one herring after another. The few people I know who know these areas never fished for them, so I doubt anyone else did. I think they just stopped coming here for food. We went from getting cut off several times a day halibut fishing to never getting cut off by sharks.

    There is no question that the issue of sharks getting spun up the line had a huge impact on the population. It is not the number caught that did it. It was the number lost by fishermen who had little idea of how to deal with that kind of fish, so they used stainless aircraft cable, which is not normally used elsewhere for shark fishing. With that said, I have never caught a fish that was tougher to keep from tail wrapping…..

    Potbuilder, Salmon Sharks are great to eat! They taste like mild swordfish. I have eaten big ones, little ones and they are all the same. IF you dumped them commercial fishing years ago, you missed out on a treat. My wife barbecues them with Cilantro Lime Butter and they cook like a steak!! If he happen to have to keep one because it gets wrapped in halibut gear, Ill make sure you get some.

  20. #20
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sterling, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    The sharks are in decline "it was the charters fault"
    The Kings are in decline "it was the guides fault"
    The beluga whales are in decline??? "it was the guides that did it"
    Global warming "the charters are to blame"
    Bad economy "charters fault again"
    The dinosaurs are extinct "it was those **** guides"
    Why don't I ever see any yeti's running around the woods? "blame the guides"



    Life is too short to pass up a day of hunting

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •