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Thread: Skatewing is excellent

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    Default Skatewing is excellent

    This past Saturday I took my wife to the Oceaniare in Minneapolis. It is arguably the best seafood place in the state. I saw on the menu they had Skatewing. I thought what the heck lets give it a try. It was different than any other fish I have had but it was outstanding. It was pan fried. It was NOTHING at all like scallops that I have heard it compared to. It was a darker flesh and softer than most but very good. I think I will have to keep a few this summer if I get any.

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    Have to imagine there's all different types of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    This past Saturday I took my wife to the Oceaniare in Minneapolis. It is arguably the best seafood place in the state. I saw on the menu they had Skatewing. I thought what the heck lets give it a try. It was different than any other fish I have had but it was outstanding. It was pan fried. It was NOTHING at all like scallops that I have heard it compared to. It was a darker flesh and softer than most but very good. I think I will have to keep a few this summer if I get any.
    Interesting. So if you had to compare it to another fish or seafood, what would it be?

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    When I was a kid living in Newport Beach & San Diego, we would catch various types of skates & rays. Some, like the shovelnose guitarfish (or commonly called 'shovelnose sandshark'), were quite good, while others like the thornback skate ("banjo shark") were .. well, blech. We'd cut faux 'scallops' from the wings of big stingrays and sautee them up. Didn't taste anything like scallops, but they were still good.

    However, it is alot more work to clean one of those buggers than it is to fillet a halibut. Not worth the effort to me now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    This past Saturday I took my wife to the Oceaniare in Minneapolis. It is arguably the best seafood place in the state. I saw on the menu they had Skatewing. I thought what the heck lets give it a try. It was different than any other fish I have had but it was outstanding. It was pan fried. It was NOTHING at all like scallops that I have heard it compared to. It was a darker flesh and softer than most but very good. I think I will have to keep a few this summer if I get any.
    I cant wait to hear your report on your opinion from the skates up here. The couple times I tried it, they were worse than horrible. Let us know what you think when you try alaskan skate.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    A friends wife years ago was upset that I had let a bunch of skates go on a recent halibut trip on my boat with her brother in law.
    She kept talking about the fake scallops deal. I told her the next time we got into a mess of skates she could have all she wanted and she got excited. Then I told her to keep her knives sharp for when I called her that we had some.
    She looked stunned and was agasp that I wouldn't be cleaning them for her. I said if you want skate you or your husband are going to clean them or you will not be receiving them and I would be releasing them.
    She hasn't asked for any skate since. Imagine that!
    I do know that there are a lot of different types of skate and the people up here I have talked to about it said it was way more work than it was worth to clean one of our Alaska skates.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    This was NOTHING at all like scallops. it was a softer meat with a somewhat sweet flavor. I fell apart very easily and was soft. It was hard to explain.

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    just let me know when you want some, i catch way too many of them buggers

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    A while back I was aboard a commercial trawler that fished out of Dutch. During the meeting with the captain we discussed the products produced aboard the boat including by-catch. Interestingly enough, they exported "skate nose" to Japan, but no other parts of skates got processed for commerce.

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    Maybe this will help you guys ,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=1YiafYmAMVg or http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=CUc1DzjHTg8

    Skate wings = Deelish!
    Pan-seared in "beurre-blanc", which is basically a reduction of vinegar, white wine and herbs (usually tarragon, but one could use thyme or other fresh herbs i suppose).

    http://culinaryarts.**********/od/buttersauces/r/beurreblanc.htm


    A new seafood market opened up within the last 6 months near my house i stopped in back in March to take a look and was impressed with there selection though small it was different, fresh monkfish, whole squid, whiting, croaker,sea robins, porgies, Frog legs, and skate wings already skinned. Back then i picked up frog legs which we love and they were great. So i venture in this past Friday to pick up some clams (topnecks) and i talk to the owner ( Lina,a nice itailian lady) and i ask her about the skates they are 2.99 a pound and she tells me how they are her favorite, white delicate meat similar to scallops and how she makes them. Well i'm a little suspicious with them being only 2.99 a pound (how good can they be?) So i pick up 4 of them they cost me a whopping $9.80. I bring them home and prepare them the ways she suggested. I rub 2 of them with EVOO add kosher salt, cracked white pepper, garlic powder, dry dill to both sides preheat the oven to 325 add white wine ( i used my homemade hard apple cider wine) and 4 table spoons of unsalted butter and bake till done (flesh flakes off cartilage with a fork). The other way was use a wok with peanut oil and heat on high season flour with kosher salt, white pepper and lightly dust the wings (make sure they are dry), slide into the wok and cook till browned and crispy once done sprinkle with a little more kosher salt and garlic powder. Well i got to tell you both myself, wife and son went nuts over the skates the baked version was sweet and succulent and the meat was not fishy tasting and way moist, have to say was one of my favorite fish yet (basa is right up there to) now the fried skate was great too the best part was you could eat the whole thing cartilage and all i put some malt vinegar on some of mine and it really put it over the top. I'll be stopping there weekly from now on to pick up more skate to enjoy.


    "when i was at rialto, we did a brown butter sauce with capers, parsley, lemon juice, and pomegranate molasses....it was excellent. try that on a skate wing sometime, and i guarantee you'll be hooked."

    " we would prepare it anglaze,which means dipped in clarifed butter and then fresh breadcrumbs, and then we would broil it in a hot oven. if you want to give it some flavor you can drizzle it with some amaretto and garnish it with toasted almond slices or slivers. this recipe is great with fluke or flounder as well."


    "Okay, first. Pat dry your wings and AGAIN SEASON WITH SALT AND PEPPER! Pick up some Wondra flour, this works the best. No egg wash just place wings in the flour and dust them off. You don't want any extra flour which will cause lumps and burn spots. Grab yourself a nice CLEAN saute pan. I use rolled steel, my days at a French restaurant took a few before I left. Okay, pour some nice grapeseed oil into the pan but don't flood it. Just enough to coat the bottom. Bring your pan up to med-high heat. Employ your wing, ONE AT A TIME. Skin side down first, this is important because the wing will bridge itself and you will not get an even color. Saut until you start to see browning on the sides of the wing, DON'T PRESS IT DOWN. Add some butter to your pan and let the butter cook until you reach a nice hazlenut aroma which is a buerre noisette "brown butter". At this point you need a spoon to parlay the butter onto the fish. Basically your basting the fish at this point. This method allows you to cook the fish skin side down and cook the exposing side with the brown butter. Wings are thin to the most part and the hot butter will finish cooking it this way when you baste it. Grab yourself some capers, put in a strainer and rinse under water, you want the capers not to be so salty. Drain. Pick some parsley, no stems. Do not mince the parsley just tear it up. Grab some almonds. Remove the wing place on a paper towel, add your capers, and almonds to the brown butter, toss a few minutes then add your parsley. Turn the heat off, place skate wing on a nice white plate and pour the ingredients over the wing from the pan. Hold off drowning the wing with the butter as you don't need a lot to achieve this finished product. I like to add into my brown butter ingredients some nice golden raisins. Good luck."

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Employ your wing, ONE AT A TIME. Skin side down first, this is important because the wing will bridge itself and you will not get an even color.
    Help me out here. Don't wings have skin on both sides? The few times I tried messing with them (a while ago) they: a) did not taste like scallops; b) were more cartilage than meat. I decided that although they tasted OK, they weren't worth the effort between the thinness, skin, and cartilage.

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    There was no cartilage on what I was served just a fairly thin slice of meat

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    That's the trimming someone mentioned. The pain is supposed to be getting those nice clean pieces of meat.

    I let a huge one go once, and tons of little ones, have always wondered.

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    We've talked and joked about it too, we get a few each summer that are monsters, but I don't have the courage to take one to the fillet tables. Has any one ever caught one with a previous hooking wound?

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    What??? I thought we put eating AK skate "to bed" years ago on the forum. First I have to add to Potbuilder's recipe, he left out the first and last step" 1) cook this on a board and Final Step: Throw everything but the board away and eat the board

    I have tried a smaller AK skate (AKA Giant Skate) of about 10 pounds and a larger one, weighed 54 pounds, a big one with huge wings. I have filleted many strange things from the land and ocean, and enjoyed some things not normally eaten, like chipmunk pie and porcupine meatballs (now those are yummy, serve with quills to spear them!) But just as NRick said above, after a lot of work trying to get around the massive amount of cartilage that is like plastic corrugated cardboard, there is very little that appears to be edible flesh. Even from a 50+ pounder, only a handful. And, yes it is edible but soft and hardly worth the effort and death of a big fish like that for 4 oz of "meat".

    Now, I ate an "angel shark" in N. California caught off a dock, and it was composed of wonderful, white, somewhat soft but truly delicious flesh. Probable called a skate somewhere. There are lots of skates in various waters, KGPCR got one of the good ones---but for sure it didn't come from PWS Alaska! That scallop myth is somewhat like the one about farm boys drinking seepage from the bottom of a corn silo and getting drunk...no body ever really did it, with a AK skate anyway

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    That...myth is somewhat like the one about farm boys drinking seepage from the bottom of a corn silo and getting drunk...
    Never heard that one before... I can think of a few things you could get from that, but drunk aint one of em.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n Ron View Post
    Now, I ate an "angel shark" in N. California caught off a dock, and it was composed of wonderful, white, somewhat soft but truly delicious flesh. Probable called a skate somewhere.
    Yep, that's a real shark, not a skate. Non-aggressive, but every once in awhile, you read a news story about a 'shark attack' by one of these ... some knucklehead grabs one by the tail & showboats for their friends. Of course the shark is gonna bite! Anyways, never caught or ate one myself.

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    Capt Ron .... Had me all the way to the seepage from a silo .... grew up in Upstate New York .... next to the Baldwin's, 300 head heard of dairy cows, made a penny a bail stacking hay in the barn for winter ..... anyway, I can say with authorty that with sorgum or corn in the two really big silos they had ... the cows that hung around to drink the "squeezins" at the base of the silo ... well they were full of milk, and those girls wanted to be miked, they would just stand there and bellow, but they were too drunk to move. Have you ever had a drunk cow step on your foot as you tried to get her into the barn? ..... BTW, I also will pass on the Skate ....

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    =

    Don't doubt there was some fermentation going on, but really nasty stuff I've heard! I grew up next to a dairy in Pennsylvania, well until I was 8 anyway, and don't remember drunken cows but do re when I went back 40 years later the same fly paper....crusted with dead flies...was still hanging there! Guess that about kills this thread, hope so before someone brings up stumps on dairy farms

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    OK .... if any one has had any luck with Alaskan Skate as food please speak up .... did not mean to kill the thread but it was good to hear that Cap'n Ron and I started out within 200 miles of each other, no where near an ocean, small world isn't it .... thread killer Bill ...

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