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Thread: Cold Blueing Small Parts

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    Default Cold Blueing Small Parts

    Does anyone know anything about, or ever tried, cold blueing small parts NOT made of gun metal?

    I want to build a lanyard for my pistol, and I would like to blue the spring clip (the part that attaches to the lanyard ring) to at least somewhat match the blueing on the gun and on the ring. I could paint it flat black, but I don't think that will be as aesthetic or as durable.

    My question is, what is the best metal and/or finish to start with for this purpose?

    The most common snap is steel with a bright, possibly chromed finish. Or I could use a galvanized part (if I can find one). The only other thing would be to use brass, but I'm not sure if that material is suitable for the job (I've seen brass lanyard rings offered for sale with the caveat "for display purposes only.")

    Any ideas would be appreciated.

    Also, I'm expecting to use the Birchwood-Casey brand Cold Blue unless someone has a better suggestion as for a better quality product or easier to use. (I've never blued anything before-obviously.)

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Cold blue works on any normal steel, some better than others but as long as not SS it will color. Birchwood-Casey brand is fine, it works.
     
    For the other stuff need to know about the design. I make my rings from 7018 welding rod and the post from 4140cm then oil-blue them, heat to dull red and quench in motor oil. That both colors them and hardens them some to reduce wear.

    Sounds like you are thinking thin flat stock maybe?

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    I have used Birchwood-Casey to blue small parts with good results. Put on a coat and follow directions then rub with steel wool and repeat until you get the results you want. Most things I done took several coats to do what I wanted. I have a .410 shot gun barrel that I blued with it over thirty years ago and it still looks good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Cold blue works on any normal steel, some better than others but as long as not SS it will color. Birchwood-Casey brand is fine, it works.
     
    For the other stuff need to know about the design. I make my rings from 7018 welding rod and the post from 4140cm then oil-blue them, heat to dull red and quench in motor oil. That both colors them and hardens them some to reduce wear.

    Sounds like you are thinking thin flat stock maybe?
    No, not at all. I bought the lanyard ring you suggested in the other thread, and I"m waiting to get the gun back from Diamond D (they have it for holster fitting) to bring it right over to you to install the ring.

    What I'm working on here is making the actual lanyard and clip itself. I plan to buy a small clip from True Value or some place, blue it, and then tie a cotton rope to it. Clip that to the lanyrd ring you're going to install and put the rope around my neck. I just want the clip to match the color of the gun.

    Essentially, I'm trying to replicate this: http://www.whatpriceglory.com/shopexd.asp?id=726&bc=no

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    I recently bought some high end cold blues, including one that requires a torch to heat the metal. I have been super busy with aircraft and business duties and have not managed to get to those projects yet.

    I have fire blued some items like screw heads and magazine tube end-caps... Fire bluing is pretty .
    This end-cap was solid rust and I fire blued it....
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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Thatís a harness snap, I think a brass one but canít tell 100%. Tandy leather will have lots of options for that. If brass the color is a patina of some type.
     
    The way itís attached looks like a tube (brass pipe nipple maybe) that the rope ends are put in and crimped in place. Then folded over the snap somehow, maybe soldered after folded.

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    Those tubes cut the cord fairly fast,weak unit for sure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Those tubes cut the cord fairly fast,weak unit for sure.
    The way I always liked was to pass the rope ends through the snap from opposite directions then tie each tail in a hangmanís noose, one set of coils stacked atop the other. Bad luck to do 13 coils though (and the legend says illegal) so 5 on each gives 10 nice looking coils.
     
    Modern way is shrink wrap, pass through opposite and lash with some good thread then shrink wrap over that. Itís real tough and durable but I got a plastic on guns allergy myself.

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    FL2, if your intent is to more or less replicate one of these <LINK>, you should note that the snap used on Korean/Nam era web gear (the cotton stuff) is very much similar to the one pictured, and were common enough that you should still be able to find some kicking around in a bin somewhere. The one pictured is brass, I believe, whereas the ones on the web gear I'm holding here in my hands appear to be some sort of nickel steel under a black painted finish. They're very robust and durable snaps, and very similar in design, construction, and appearance to the one pictured.

    As for the attachment, if you want something more or less visually similar to the original, but with more modern strength and durability I would use a piece of 1" black nylon web through the snap and wrapped over the lanyard cord like the original brass crimp, and stitched down to the cord with black bonded nylon thread.
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    Ive cold blued lots of ferrous metals (not just gun parts) I get my cold bluing supplies from Brownells and like Dicropan and oxpho blue and m blue and super blue. After trying a bunch I favor Dicropan.

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/metal-prep-coloring/metal-bluing/liquid-cold-bluing-chemicals/index.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    FL2, if your intent is to more or less replicate one of these <LINK>, you should note that the snap used on Korean/Nam era web gear (the cotton stuff) is very much similar to the one pictured, and were common enough that you should still be able to find some kicking around in a bin somewhere. The one pictured is brass, I believe, whereas the ones on the web gear I'm holding here in my hands appear to be some sort of nickel steel under a black painted finish. They're very robust and durable snaps, and very similar in design, construction, and appearance to the one pictured.

    As for the attachment, if you want something more or less visually similar to the original, but with more modern strength and durability I would use a piece of 1" black nylon web through the snap and wrapped over the lanyard cord like the original brass crimp, and stitched down to the cord with black bonded nylon thread.
    Yeah I remember those snaps. We were still using those in basic training in the early 90's. Other than the back side being flat, those would work pretty good.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    ...Other than the back side being flat, those would work pretty good.
    On mine the part that comprises the hook is composed of round stock (except for the closure spring itself, which is flat, but of the same width as the round stock. The only flattened portion on the back is at the top junction with the ring. Mine are far less flat than the one on the original lanyard I linked to on fleabay.
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    The one you linked to is the exact same one I linked to, just from a different vendor. They're repros made in Kuwait. They're very nicely made, but the user reports are predominately negative in regards to the flat spring metal breaking rather quickly. Essentially, they're for display, not hard use.

    I'm envisioning my own creation with a circular backside so as to accept standard rope, but I want that type of snap on the front half, to connect to the gun. And those parts are out there, I just need to know what type of metal to use for best blueing results.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I'm envisioning my own creation with a circular backside so as to accept standard rope, but I want that type of snap on the front half, to connect to the gun. And those parts are out there, I just need to know what type of metal to use for best blueing results.
    OK, I was confused by your use of "backside"... You're looking for a snap with a round attachment ring, rather than a square (rectangular) one. There are lots of options that fit that description, so long as you're not concerned with a "historically accurate" appearance. And unfortunately, most all will be chrome plated, or similar, which I don't imagine you can blue (?).

    Personally, my next choice might be something like this HM-220: https://www.lanyardsupply.com/hooks/...ook-hm-251.htm
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Personally, my next choice might be something like this HM-220: https://www.lanyardsupply.com/hooks/...ook-hm-251.htm
    ....But if you're wanting to stick with the "non-swiveling wire loop spring hook" style snap like this: http://www.umei.com/hooks/schematic/...ks-hm-6311.htm except with a round ring, then I'm at a loss. I've never seen one with a round ring.
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    Of course I'm concerned with historical accuracy; I'm a history teacher. LOL.

    In fact, I was just going to buy the repro lanyard we both linked to, until I saw all of the negative comments on the snap breaking. Although, the look I REALLLLLY wanted to go for was the Northwest Mounted Police/RCMP dress, which requires the use of white rope. I've not yet found a good photo or illustration with a lanyard snap for that era, but I know they bought a bunch of Colt New Service revolvers, which look the same as mine on the outside (mine is a different caliber), so I know the lanyard ring for the pistol is going to be "right."

    In the end, I want a useable lanyard that will work if needed.

    I bought a 3/8" dia spring snap at True Value just now. It's zinc, as opposed to "nickel", which was also an option. Don't know it it will work I may end up buying that repro lanyard in the end, as it's about $30 shipped and I am now $10 into this ($1 clip, $9 blueing) not knowing if the blueing will work and still having to buy the rope.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Although, the look I REALLLLLY wanted to go for was the Northwest Mounted Police/RCMP dress, which requires the use of white rope.
    Something makes me want to think the RCMP lanyard didn't/doesn't utilize a clip. I think it simply has a looped end that's hitched onto the ring.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Something makes me want to think the RCMP lanyard didn't/doesn't utilize a clip. I think it simply has a looped end that's hitched onto the ring.
    Interesting. Of all the period photos I've found, none show that end, but it has to be tied into a knot somewhere.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Interesting. Of all the period photos I've found, none show that end, but it has to be tied into a knot somewhere.
    Yeah, the neck end I believe is spliced into a loop and uses a sliding Turk's head knot to adjust closure; I think the gun end is similarly spliced to a loop and just cinched to the gun's lanyard ring. I've read that originally they were made by individual officers from cod line and dyed with coffee grounds to camo with the brown field uniform, but before too long they were only used with the red dress uniform and were kept bright white. They've been made of nylon cord since 1950... I don't have any good pic's of the gun end either. I bet you could email the RCMP and ask someone for a photo tho.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    OK, here ya go; picture of a lanyard cinched to a simple swivel clip: http://www.rcmpveteransvancouver.com...chment_id=8223

    And part way down this page is a lanyard: http://rcmpinsignia.tripod.com/page-...-clothing.html
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