Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: camera on a bow

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    169

    Default camera on a bow

    im sure this is on here somewhere but, what are the legalities of attaching a go pro to my bow for bear baiting, in a non weapon restricted area?

  2. #2
    Member AK Trout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Ak
    Posts
    278

    Default

    Page 22. "You MAY NOT use electronic devices or lights attached to the bow, arrow, or arrowhead with the exception of a non-illuminating camera or a lighted nock on the end of the arrow"

    So as long as its non-illuminating its fine.

    "I Envy Him And Him Only, That Catches More Fish Than I Do" Izaac Walton 1653
    The question of hunting is not a matter of life or death... it's more important than that

  3. #3
    Member JuliW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    1,189

    Default

    I love having the video camera (Sony AS10) on my bow. I used it deer hunting last fall. Sad part is that I was so excited to see the first deer of the season, I forgot to turn it on and missed getting my first shot on video. Oh well!

    Have fun with it! Can't wait to see those videos! I love bear hunting!
    Taxidermy IS art!
    www.alaskawildliferugs.com
    Your mount is more than a trophy, it's a memory. Relive The Memory!

  4. #4
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Your question was in a NON-weapons restricted area, the answer is yes you can afix electronics to the bow. Alot of people get confused on this as the regs are vague. But you can use lighted pins, etc on non restricted hunts. The regulations only address restricted hunts so in unrestricted hunts, by default they are legal. We went through this on POW a couple years ago. I use an electronic sight and was told it was not legal...got out the book and asked where is the prohibition? Its not in there, but alot of folks think it carries over.

  5. #5
    Member Roger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sunshine Alaska
    Posts
    2,049

    Default

    I have a few on my bow and have been checked by F&G and no problems yet Who needs a production crew.
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  6. #6
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hughiam View Post
    Your question was in a NON-weapons restricted area, the answer is yes you can afix electronics to the bow. Alot of people get confused on this as the regs are vague. But you can use lighted pins, etc on non restricted hunts. The regulations only address restricted hunts so in unrestricted hunts, by default they are legal. We went through this on POW a couple years ago. I use an electronic sight and was told it was not legal...got out the book and asked where is the prohibition? Its not in there, but alot of folks think it carries over.
    How was your sight electronic?

  7. #7
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

  8. #8
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I dont know how you got off with that... I am not going to sit and argue but I would think most troopers would consider that an electronic device, just the same as how you cant use a light to illuminate sight pins, and how are you legally hunting with a scope.....?

  9. #9
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

    Default

    You CAN use lighted pins, etc during non-resticted hunts. Simple. For instance, if I draw the Eklutna Archery Sheep tag, I have to switch to a non electronic sight. But to hunt during any open season, non-weapons restricted hunt, its legal. The only restriction on lighted pins, or scopes like I use is during resticted hunts. If you read the regs, there are no prohibitions listed for lighted pins, except on archery only hunts. Many people infer that because they are not allowed in restricted hunts, it carries over to archery in general. It doesnt.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    I dont know how you got off with that... I am not going to sit and argue but I would think most troopers would consider that an electronic device, just the same as how you cant use a light to illuminate sight pins, and how are you legally hunting with a scope.....?
    The Red Dot scopes were specifically addressed in one of the "Ask a Wildlife Trooper" questions. http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Game-in-Alaska

    As Hughiam stated, they are legal in the non-weapons restricted hunts. Essentially, as long as you are not projecting light toward the target, it is okay. Pretty well explained at the link above.

  11. #11
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

    Default

    To further beat this dead horse, let me also say if I drew the Eklunta sheep tag(non-archery) I CAN use my bow with lighted pins or my aimpoint. Same sheep I'd be hunting with the archery tag, but not legal to use the lighted pins. But legal with a bow with lighted pins if you draw the "non" archery tag. I guess you know where I stand on the lighted pin arguement. I did a post about this some months ago that really set off a firestorm here.

  12. #12
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hughiam View Post
    You CAN use lighted pins, etc during non-resticted hunts. Simple. For instance, if I draw the Eklutna Archery Sheep tag, I have to switch to a non electronic sight. But to hunt during any open season, non-weapons restricted hunt, its legal. The only restriction on lighted pins, or scopes like I use is during resticted hunts. If you read the regs, there are no prohibitions listed for lighted pins, except on archery only hunts. Many people infer that because they are not allowed in restricted hunts, it carries over to archery in general. It doesnt.
    You say only during weapons restricted hunts you cant use lighted pins, but yet artificial light is mentioned in the general restrictions... Page 20 ADFG regs : General hunting restrictions for big game: You may not use artificial light for taking big game. This applies whether it is illuminating the animal or your pins, and it doesn't matter which because it is still artificial light being used to aid the hunter in the taking of game.

    Last fall season my hunting partner was asked by a fish and game trooper to show him his sight to make sure he didn't have a battery in his light for illuminating his pins. He didn't have anything in so nothing happened but this trooper told us that he finds people with them often and told us in very clear and concise terms that it is in fact a wildlife infraction.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKRecurveAssassin View Post
    You say only during weapons restricted hunts you cant use lighted pins, but yet artificial light is mentioned in the general restrictions... Page 20 ADFG regs : General hunting restrictions for big game: You may not use artificial light for taking big game. This applies whether it is illuminating the animal or your pins, and it doesn't matter which because it is still artificial light being used to aid the hunter in the taking of game.

    Last fall season my hunting partner was asked by a fish and game trooper to show him his sight to make sure he didn't have a battery in his light for illuminating his pins. He didn't have anything in so nothing happened but this trooper told us that he finds people with them often and told us in very clear and concise terms that it is in fact a wildlife infraction.
    Please check out the link I posted above to the "ask a wildlife trooper" thread specifically about this subject. It is pretty clear. The law is regarding lighting that projects toward the target.

    Here is a quote from that thread:

    "The Board of Game specifically addressed “aim point” or “red dot” style scopes several years ago when they added laser sight and electronically enhanced night vision scopes. The board discussed that these types of scopes did not fall into the category of “artificial light”. The board concluded that in the future if aim point scopes were found to give an unfair advantage or were detrimental to the game populations, the board would address them specifically as they did laser sights and night vision. The laser sight projects a laser light down range onto the target. This type of sight is clearly prohibited. The night vision scope enhances existing light to make a dark target visible. This is also clearly prohibited. The “aim point” scope is neither of these. The “aim point” scope projects an aim point back onto the shooters eye and projects nothing downrange.

    So the answer is that “red dot” or “illuminated reticule” style scopes, battery operated or not, are currently legal in Alaska as long as the scope does not project a light forward. The reason for this is contained in 5 AAC 92.075 which specifies that big game may be taken by any method unless it is prohibited in 5AAC 92.080 or 5 AAC 92.085 or other regulations. "

  14. #14
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Hey anchskier, if you read what I wrote, it had nothing to do with Red-dot or illuminated reticle scopes, it has to do with lighted pins on a bowsight. It is a completely different ball field. You are talking about different things. A red-dot or illuminated scope doesn't illuminate anything outside of its scope, meaning that it does not project light in any way. A light which illuminates sight pins is an external source of illumination (basically its a flashlight) and has external illumination properties.
    Either way, like you string rifle nuts need any more help than what you have already got, and by string rifle, yes I mean compound bows

  15. #15
    Member Hughiam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Im not buying it. The illumination clause refers to Jacklighing or shining. While it could be interpreted as applying to pins, I'd argue that one in court. Also if it is illegal, you would have to be caught using it while hunting. Just having it on your bow, but not using it would be like having a flashlight in your pocket while hunting with a rifle. Unless you are in the act of shining it while the gun is loaded, you are in the clear. Same would apply to the light on your pins. IMO.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •