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Thread: WHAT does it MEAN............"PRICES are to HIGH"

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    Default WHAT does it MEAN............"PRICES are to HIGH"

    Prices are to HIGH.......what does that mean.......??? It is one of the most common statements on this forum. Does it mean you are cheap ??? Does it mean you are Poor/Broke/No money ??? Does it mean you consider yourself a wheeler dealer ??? When you hear someone say the price is to high........what do you think they mean.....??? What do you mean to communicate when you say the price (or Prices) to high......??? As it relates to Firearms/Ammo/Components.

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    If I think something is "priced to high", that means I do not think that the cost is representative of the value of the object, or service, etc, to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    If I think something is "priced to high", that means I do not think that the cost is representative of the value of the object, or service, etc, to me.
    Spot on, wether others agree is the key question for those attempting to set the price...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Its value is set by the buyers, not by the sellers.

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    Default simple..

    Simple to define: If the price is "too high", the item doesn't sell. All this assumes that there are potential buyers present and the item is on the market for a reasonable period of time.

    If an item sells too quickly it may have been priced too low or perhaps the seller just got lucky. Then there are times when an item just doesn't sell at any price - the seller may just be unlucky and/or there are just no buyers for that item.

    This is my experience from being on both sides of the table at many gun shows around the county for the last 50 years or so.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    I say it is set by both buyer and seller. It may very well be worth more to me as a seller than a buyer is willing to pay today, maybe tomorrow the buyer may up the value, or I may reduce the value it has to me. I have sold firearms that shortly after I regretted selling, and would have paid a premium to get it back.



    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    Its value is set by the buyers, not by the sellers.

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    You know, I for one am about as tired of hearing you call people "cheap" as you are of hearing people say the "Price is too high."

    338 said it best. People don't understand the value of a dollar and what it takes to earn that dollar. This is especially true of the younger crowd, but I see it in every demographic.

    The value of an item is set when the demand for that item meets the supply of that item. This is known as equilibrium. High prices drive demand down while low prices drive demand up. High supply drives prices down while low supply drives prices up. Somewhere in the middle, you'll find the equilibrium, also known as the market price. When the price gets "too high" meaning the value of the item is not comparable to the price paid, consumers are supposed to stop buying that item. The resultant drop in demand will cause a lagging drop in price.

    Ammo has been one of the things where I see people not following this basic economic principle. For some insane reason, people don't stop buying when the price gets too high. They treat it like they treated the housing bubble, and we all know how that ended.

    Let's use your Winchester 44 mag rifle for an example. You've been trying to sell that thing for forever. Since Sept. 24th. (And if I recall correctly, you had a different thread trying to sell it well over a year ago.) And you've been asking a price close to a thousand dollars with no takers. (You obviously don't understand how hard it is for most folks to acquire a thousand dollars.)

    No one is buying your gun because the price is "too high" (way way WAAAAAAY too high.) Consumers feel that the value of their thousand dollars is greater than the value of a Japanese made Winchester rifle. (I specified Winchester because consumer taste plays a part in demand. You will notice that pre 64 Winchesters sell for near that price or more all the time.) Additionally, there is a suitable "alternative product" available, the Rossi Model 92 in the same caliber, for half the price. When the price of one item is "too high", consumers will find and purchase an alternative item until the price of the first item comes down.

    I've seen the same issue with ammo over the past couple years. The value of a brick of 22 ammo simply does not equal the value of my $80 or what other thing I could buy or do with that $80. Remember, for everything you buy there is a cost and an opportunity cost. The opportunity cost is the next best thing I could do with the money spent.

    Back to your rifle: I could buy your rifle for a thousand dollars...ORRR...I could buy airfare for my son's summer trip to Alaska this year. If I buy your rifle, my cost is $1000 but my opportunity cost is my son's summer trip. (Or some other thing, doesn't matter what.) For me, the value of that sumer trip is far (FARRRRR) greater than the value of your rifle.

    So this is what is meant by "prices are too high." The prices people are asking for shooting related items simply do not match the value and opportunity cost of the currency used to make the purchase.

    I just covered the essence of a semester of my 12th grade Economics class. Your welcome.

    PS: I know that your response is going to be "But I paid such and such for the rifle." (Probably $1400ish as I recall that was Winchester's MSRP a few years back.) Certainly you feel you have some "right" to recover most, if not all, of your "investment." (If you can call it that.) The bottom line here, and, in my view, with most of the shooting related items being sold on local websites and at gun shows is that, just because you failed to follow basic economic principles and paid too much for an item, doesn't mean the rest of us are going to make the same mistake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I have sold firearms that shortly after I regretted selling, and would have paid a premium to get it back.
    I have had similar experiences, and this feeds into my economics lesson. In 2004 I sold a Winchester Model 94AE (post 64 gun) to a friend for $400. I hadn't fired the gun in over ten years. I wanted the money to put down on a new car. AT THE TIME, the value of the new car was worth more to me than the value of the gun, so I sold the gun. Ten years later, I no longer have the car (totaled by the insurance company) and I really wish I still had the gun. The lesson I learned: NEVER sell a gun. LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I have had similar experiences, and this feeds into my economics lesson. In 2004 I sold a Winchester Model 94AE (post 64 gun) to a friend for $400.
    I have never sold a gun, but i sold two late 90s Tundras to a friend of mine for about 4 or 5 hundred each. I value my friendship with him more than I valued the additional $ that they were worth. What goes around comes around. Sometimes I miss those machines, then I think ah heck, if I need to use one, I know where to go asking...

    Point is, life is to short to put the screws to everyone you deal with. In the end you leave with none of it.

    yes, prices for guns, ammo, components are too high, for what things are worth, by almost any definition you can make up. Yes, they are valued at whatever a buyer is willing to pay, doesn't mean that is what it's worth, and there's a sucker or ten born everyday...

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    In pure economics it may be a simple answer but in reality emotions and beliefs enter the equation. If I have a strong feeling in wanting something and say the price is too high- it costs more than I can afford to pay for it. Other things that I have no emotional investment in I may simply have an economic viewpoint in and pass on that item. I spend as much on some knives as I do on guns. They are worth it to me and I am sure most would say that the price was 'way too high' because they can get a cutting utensil for cheaper. It is irrelevant to me if it is something I want- I will spend what it is worth to me.

    In my opinion things are worth what people will pay- nothing else.

    BTW- I wish that the lever Winnies were American made as well but they are **** fine guns!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Point is, life is to short to put the screws to everyone you deal with. In the end you leave with none of it.
    .
    Couldn't have said it better myself...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    [QUOTE=FL2AK-Old Town;1364008]You know, I for one am about as tired of hearing you call people "cheap" as you are of hearing people say the "Price is too high."

    Amen to that!

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    Prices at a gun show are too high when you can buy a new whatever at a retail store cheaper than the same thing costs used at a gun show.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    Prices at a gun show are too high when you can buy a new whatever at a retail store cheaper than the same thing costs used at a gun show.
    and that is not limited to Alaska.

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    [QUOTE=AlaskanTides;1364034]
    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    You know, I for one am about as tired of hearing you call people "cheap" as you are of hearing people say the "Price is too high."

    Amen to that!
    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to AlaskanTides again.

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    Very Interesting...............It does not bother me in the least if people feel the price is too high. I figure they would rather have money then have a given firearm. They are entitled to that choice. And it sure does not bother me what people pay for ammo or choose to keep their money and not have ammo.

    I am buying .223 Remington, 77 gr. MatchKing ammo by the case every time I go to town. And I am paying near three times the price I paid 15 months ago. I am selling all of my bolt action centerfire rifles. I only have two remaining to sell. Someone will buy the Winchester Model 70 "Classic" .243 Win. for exactly what I am asking $999.99 It is a fair price.


    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    You know, I for one am about as tired of hearing you call people "cheap" as you are of hearing people say the "Price is too high.".

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    BTW- I wish that the lever Winnies were American made as well but they are **** fine guns!
    Yeah I didn't mean to bash the guns based on their quality or lack thereof. IN fact, I had tyo stop doing that because I couldn't find anyone who owned one who didn't like it, so I'm sure they're great guns.

    In this instance, I threw in the Japan part because consumer taste plays a big (huge) role in the price point of a product. A better example of this is the big SUV gas hogs. When fuel prices were low (whenever THAT was) EVERYONE had a full size SUV and they were selling like hot cakes. (I worked at a GMC dealer at the time-2003/4-and we just couldn't get enough to sell fast enough). Then fuel prices soared and, all of a sudden, consumers wanted better fuel economy and then we had a surplus on the lot. We were knocking as much as 10 grand off the price of SUV's. GM closed their plant in Ohio in part because of lack of consumer demand for full size SUV's.

    In regards to quality of the jap winchesters, as long as there is a comparable alternative out there, which includes American made lever guns and the Rossi's, both of which are of high enough quality to be consider an alternative tot he Miroku guns, consumers are going to migrate to those lower priced alternatives.

    When AGL4now logs in and reads this, he is going to think I was denigrating his gun and going after him personally, but it just made a good teaching example. I hope he doesn't take it personal.

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    No......But if you think the quality and craftsmanship of a Rossi is equal to Jap built Winchester M-92, well what can I say.



    [QUOTE=FL2AK-Old Town;1364069
    When AGL4now logs in and reads this, he is going to think I was denigrating his gun and going after him personally, but it just made a good teaching example. I hope he doesn't take it personal.[/QUOTE]

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    When you can buy NIB for 5-15% more, most people are going to buy NIB.

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    Please give an example...........I would prefer an example reference a firearm I have for sale........Please


    Quote Originally Posted by mike h View Post
    When you can buy NIB for 5-15% more, most people are going to buy NIB.

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