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Thread: I Muddied The Drinking Water

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    Default I Muddied The Drinking Water

    I MUDDIED THE DRINKING WATER

    BEAR HUNTING 

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    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Drink the muddy water and live.The doc will fix the bugs if you get them.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  3. #3

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    Yeah, I like that Amigo, but once again sometimes I/we make the wrong choices. Yes,some have paid dearly and I am glad I was not one of those. Even after all the years I have hunted, I still made those mistakes that day. I broke my main rule "Think about where you are, what you are going to do and take your time doing and don't rush."
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Usually, depending on the terrain, the only time I'll drop my pack is within a few yards of reaching the intended goal. It "can" be quite hard to find your pack again once you leave it in AK.

    Most survivalists say that sure, it's not wise to drink questionable water, and most of us know that. But in the case that you are getting severely dehydrated, or, even worse, could possibly suffer a heat stroke, you need to drink the water no matter what. Especially if you're not far from being able to get to a doctor very soon, which is pretty much anywhere in the lower 48. Don't take a chance with your life worrying about bugs in the water...
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5

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    Yes indeed, good point, I like your comment You know I might not have second guessed that and drank that muddy water but was more than likely influenced by the Ameba I contracted some years earlier and how it almost ended my life before it was eliminated.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    Yeah, I like that Amigo, but once again sometimes I/we make the wrong choices. Yes,some have paid dearly and I am glad I was not one of those. Even after all the years I have hunted, I still made those mistakes that day. I broke my main rule "Think about where you are, what you are going to do and take your time doing and don't rush."
    Indeed....in the heat of the moment it's easy to not stop and go over things in your mind before you do them. Experience plays a big part in that......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    One morning while guiding a hunter for moose I was spotting bulls everywhere. Almost every open meadow had bulls sparring in it. It was intensely exciting and it was all I could do just to concentrate and try and find the nicest bull. Once I made up my mind and decided what approach we would take, I stood up, put on my pack and headed down the high knoll we were spotting from. As we approached the bottom of the knoll, I kept having this awkward feeling that something just wasn't right....it kept gnawing at me as I walked but I kinda brushed it aside. But finally that feeling just wouldn't leave me alone and I made myself stop and think. As I stood there it quickly dawned on me that I had left my rifle. But it was the fact that I had to actually make myself stop and think to figure out what I had done....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    Yes indeed, good point, I like your comment You know I might not have second guessed that and drank that muddy water but was more than likely influenced by the Ameba I contracted some years earlier and how it almost ended my life before it was eliminated.
    Now THAT would definitely make you think twice. Glad you're still with us!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  9. #9

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    Yup, been there done that. Took off my pack for a break and a zipper drop. Spotted a deer disappearing into an alder patch about 100 yards away and moved to intercept on the far side. Got there in time to see him disappear into the next, and move again to intercept. Yup, going into the next patch by the time I got there. Finally connected with the nice buck. Spent the next three hours searching for my RealTree pack in the brush and grass. With my wallet, keys, tag, knife, water and lunch in it.

    Now a roll of survey tape lives in that pack, and I mark it every single stinking time it comes off my shoulders.

  10. #10

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    Sheep hunting - Lost my jacket off the pack once on ascent (should have put it in); weather turned Big and I had to try to find the jacket on a dangerous wet descent and finally, with luck, spotted it and barely managed getting to it. A close call !

    This is easy to have on your person: http://www.rei.com/product/799003/st...water-purifier
    "Punish the monkey - let the organ grinder go" - Mark Knopfler

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Wouldn't the bugs be in the water whether you stirred it up or not?
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you can’t tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Wouldn't the bugs be in the water whether you stirred it up or not?
    Yes, of course but he mentioned crawly things that I guess he could actually see....

    I did however read an article once that said you have less of a chance at picking up giardia cysts if you drink from the surface of deeper water rather than from water on the shoreline. They say the cysts tend to sink.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Just as easy to loose your gear in Arizona! You wouldn’t think so but lean a rifle on a distinct rock and when you come back looking you find all the distinct rocks look much the same.

     
    In the 70s 20 miles south of Crown King AZ I took a ten or so mile downhill hike hunting, Dad took the horses to Tip Top (ghost town) to meat me there. Along my hike I found a road cut into the mountain but there were no roads around so I followed it. Before 100 yards I came to a saguaro with an arm growing in the road. It takes 70-80 years for them to get an arm started and this one was big, I was standing on a road that hadn’t been used in close to 100 years. This bit of old road was maybe 200 yards long washed out on ether end and there was a mine shaft with collapsed wooden doors I couldn’t open without a shovel so I planed to bring one back. Guys I been back there twenty times over the years shovel in hand looking for that road . . . I know right where I left it but danged if I can find the thing! If you can loose a dang road with Chinese stacked rockwork that should be visible a mile off imagine how easy it is to loose a daypack or a rifle!
    Andy
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  14. #14

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    ADfields, man is that ever so true in Arizona. My back pack was a od green, brown with black straps and I truly was concerned about finding it. Shoot, I lost my green and brown jeep one day for half a day and realized I had come at one point within 50yrds of that jeep. Jumpers all over the place and brown rocks and ground hid that jeep for a while from me.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I have found leaving any part of your gear is usually a bad idea unless its the very final act you do before shooting. Nobody plans on getting hurt but if you do whatever you left may be what you need to survive and is then unattainable.
    I remember hunting red foxes one day in plowed corn fields. Usually two of us would spot foxes early morning and meet about eleven then stalk in from opposite directions with shotguns and when the fox awoke and saw one of us we would run at it and literally guide it to the second hunter who would be lying down in ambush...
    If you want to have fun try finding a black pair of binocs in a several hundred acre black lumpy dirt field you laid down like my partner did. Took us all day and ruined our plans. I know where there is a nice bull magnet moose call hanging in a pine tree in Ontario too that I will never see again..
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    One of the reasons that a lot of my vital gear is turning blaze orange and other brighter colors these days. I dropped a nice Eberlestock in MAX1 on a final stalk a few years back. Left it on a open piece of gravel on top of a small ridge…should have been a snap to find. It wasn't…took well over an hour to find it again.

    If it had been some bright color I would have walked right to it.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  17. #17

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    Yes, hodgeman, I am thinking of doing just that with some bright colors.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    One of the reasons that a lot of my vital gear is turning blaze orange and other brighter colors these days. I dropped a nice Eberlestock in MAX1 on a final stalk a few years back. Left it on a open piece of gravel on top of a small ridge…should have been a snap to find. It wasn't…took well over an hour to find it again.

    If it had been some bright color I would have walked right to it.
    Hodgeman I have been looking at the eberlestock packs with the rifle scabbard. If that I what you have how hard is it to lift the gun from the pack while wearing it? Or any comments from anyone else that uses one?
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    Hodgeman I have been looking at the eberlestock packs with the rifle scabbard. If that I what you have how hard is it to lift the gun from the pack while wearing it? Or any comments from anyone else that uses one?
    It was pretty easy to draw the rifle with the pack on…but if you put any kind of weight in it, it was miserable to carry for any amount of time.

    The scabbard was cool but the pack part didn't suit me well.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Supporting Member Hoyt-Hunter's Avatar
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    I have used my eberlestock on a goat hunt and carried most of a goat and gear out. It wasn't the best pack to take that much weight out with but I have also had worse. At no time could I get my scoped rifle out while wearing it, not even with just a small amount of camp gear. I do like the pack though.


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