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Thread: ?? about wounded bear follow-up

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    Default ?? about wounded bear follow-up

    Folk seem to have differnet ideas about the follow-up procedure, after the smoke clears and the fur has run away.
    On a B Bear I have run in, cautiously, to keep a bearing on where the critter is heading. Have heard of guides doing the same thing for Gbear, after a solid hit, to aid the tracking. Seems to push them, to die faster ?
    This issue comes about after hearing about a couple of hunters that had to follow a loooong blod trail, only to loose it and consiquently, the bear too.
    So, wait 20 minutes, or rush things after the shot ?

    edit - realized this is my first post. Have lurked for awhile though. you guys are good info and entertainment.

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    It depends entirely on the situation- specifically the visibility. I've done it twice- once in thick stuff and another in broken country with a mix of alders patches, narrow draws and rolling grassland.

    In the first case the bear stayed in the really thick stuff, but there was an overlooking open ridge close by. We watched for half an hour or so from the open ridge without seeing the bear, so I went down into the alders while my pard paced me from above. Very, very slow forward movement with lots of shifting side to side for better views. Found the bear about 200 yards in. Dead. But I couldn't see him till I was about 15 feet away and my pard couldn't see him at all.

    In the second instance no patch of cover was very big and the bear was only pausing in them briefly, then moving on. We pushed hard to get within range, then dropped it at 300-350 yards with a Texas heart shot from my 375.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Texas Heart Shot!!!

    Went to Joe Wants Bear hunting clinic last year. He said that the Texas Heart shot "AKA BUT SHOT" was one of the best places to shoot a Brown bear. After putting my first shot in his left shoulder my follow up shot hit him in the right rear leg just to the right of his vent. His guts are visible in the entry would. That shot had him on the ground in less than 15 yards. Many nerves and major blood supply to both rear legs in that area. Hard on the meat for most game but for brown or grizzly I would take that shot anytime.


    Steve

  4. #4

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    just think about your situation. can you get a shot off in the brush you are going into? is the weather gonna kill your blood trail? did you feel like it was a good hit? no two situations are the same and all need to be evaluated. there is no better adrenaline rush then brush thrashing for a hurt bear.

    Make your first hit a good one and go from there.

    on texas heart shots, I killed a big b bear where it stood with a texas heart shot, and it ruined 0 meat.....right in the doughnut. the shockwave of the bullet dislocated the hips and it was piled up right there dead.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default Wounded BB

    I have only had to track one wounded BB into the thick stuff. I shot a bear at Cold Bay (375 Wby with 270g Barns X) and my hunting did the follow up shot (300 Wby with 200g NP). After sagging down from the seated position the bear took off so fast thru the alders that if I had not known what it was I don't think I could have recognized it as a bear. It was early in the afternoon so we elected to wait 45 min before following the blood trail. On examining the site where the bear had been shot we found lots of hair, bone fragments, blood and two separate holes in the mud where both shots had completely penetrated the bear and then gone into the mud on the other side. Good to see but still with a wounded brownie in the alders we were certainly not at ease. Talk about walking on egg shells! My partner and I slowly, and I mean s l o w l y penetrated the almost impentratable alders with the blood trail between us. He followed the blood while I continually scanned the dark shadows infront and to each side. In 15 minutes we had only made about 20 yards headway when suddenly my partner stopped....I asked him "What is it?" but he just stood there not answering me. When I finally glanced down from trying to peer thru the black shadows there was a bear paw about two feet infront of us sticking out from under an alder....attached to the paw was one very dead bear. Upon skinning the bear we found that both of our bullets had pierced the heart! Just to make it interesting we were just able to make out thru the alders above us maybe three hundred yards up on a hill side a large sow seated with a cub seated on each side of her. She and the cubs never moved and watched us the entire time we skinned the bear. I'm surprised we did not cut outselves since we weren't paying a lot of attention to the skinning job.

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    In my opinion, the best way to track a bears is to wait a good while, then track with two people. One person does only tracking, and the other person only watches for the bear. This method of tracking should work in almost any situation. -Eric

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    I know nothing of bear hunting and tracking, but I have read in a couple of books relating to guides, that it's a good idea to wait awhile after a solid hit to allow the bear to bleed and hopefully die, and also to allow the legs or whatever part was injured to stiffen-up. Is this true? It makes sense, but I have not personal experiences to tell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RayfromAK View Post
    I know nothing of bear hunting and tracking, but I have read in a couple of books relating to guides, that it's a good idea to wait awhile after a solid hit to allow the bear to bleed and hopefully die, and also to allow the legs or whatever part was injured to stiffen-up. Is this true? It makes sense, but I have not personal experiences to tell.
    Some guides like to run in right away so the bear doesn't have time to set up a trap, but I don't think the vast majority of bears know how to double back and set traps. I would let the bear, or moose, or deer, or whatever animal stiffen up and bleed out before following it up. Having a two man team with specific jobs and a plan laid out is a good idea. -Eric

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    Some guides like to run in right away so the bear doesn't have time to set up a trap,
    The other reason I heard was just to get a good bearing on direction of travel, and to get close for 'sound' tracking, before things want quiet and scary.
    and also to allow the legs or whatever part was injured to stiffen-up.
    A bear can go a long ways on three legs or one lung.
    How many GBears will actually turn and stand their ground ? Most will hi-tail it for safe distances.
    Wouldn't a bleeding wound tend to close up sooner, if the animal is not moving quickly ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillP in BC View Post
    A bear can go a long ways on three legs or one lung.
    How many GBears will actually turn and stand their ground ? Most will hi-tail it for safe distances.
    Wouldn't a bleeding wound tend to close up sooner, if the animal is not moving quickly ?
    An unpressured animal will tend to bed down sooner compared to a wounded animal that is being forced to move. Have you ever hurt your back, or knee, and have it hurt pretty good that day, but still have it usable, and the next day it has stiffened up enough that you can't move? Thats about the best way I can explain the concept of waiting for animals to stiffen.

    The bear, or whatever animal, will have lots of adrenaline going through its system while being followed. Adrenaline is very powerful, by waiting you let the adrenaline go away, and with that you take away the bears source of energy.

    Yes a wound will close up sooner in an animal that is not moving quickly, but an animal moving quickly enough to keep a wound open may go way further than you want it to, and therefore decrease your chances of finding it. I'm obviously a fan of waiting before following up game, and in my experience that method has worked well. But every situation is different, and you'll have to decide for yourself when the time comes.

    -Eric

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