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Thread: smoked moose jerky

  1. #1
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    Default smoked moose jerky

    I have a new smoker and want to make some jerky out of some moose steaks I have. I would like to cure them and smoke them in jerky strips. should I just use the kits they have at the store that have cure and seasoning then smoke it? not sure how long to smoke it etc.....

    any help is appreciated, thanks.

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    [QUOTE=yukon;1363209]I have a new smoker and want to make some jerky out of some moose steaks I have. I would like to cure them and smoke them in jerky strips. should I just use the kits they have at the store that have cure and seasoning then smoke it? not sure how long to smoke it etc.....

    any help is appreciated, thanks.[/QUOTE

    Hello, Appreciate your question. The problem with a question such as this, you could ask 6 people and get 8 different answers. A lot of it is preference. You don't have any preference yet as it's new to you. The basics though should be the same. Low and slow, finish out at 160 deg and stop the cooking when done, get out of smoker to cool...

    First, most of the kits sold have the complete components to do jerky.. They also provide good instructions including length of time. Suggest you follow those instructions until you do a few batches and then start fine tuning what you want the final product to be.

    All smokers are different and controlling the heat is a major issue. Insulated or non insulated, a thermostat to maintain the temp or a manual adjustment to keep trying to maintain, all of these are issues. This will come with using your smoker so I would suggest you start with small batches until you figure out your smoker and what it's going to take to achieve the final product.

    Cure the product per instructions. If you have a vacuum pack container to do the curing in will have much better results than static curing ( soaking in a pan)

    Preheat smoker to 100 deg or with product inside and slowly bring up temps to 165 deg over 3 to 6 hours. Leave the smoke pan in about 2 to 3 hours , no longer, then finish out to bring up to temp and you should have your first batch. Fine tune times to what you want in finished product. It's important to finish out to 165 deg. to be safe. ALSO USE CURES PROVIDED TO BE SAFE...

    Product will not be shelf stable. Must be kept refrigerated or frozen, prefer vacuum packing.

    DO NOT OVER COOK----DO NOT OVER SMOKE....................

    Good luck and let us know how your do...

    Butch and Staff

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    Thanks a bunch. I have an electric smoker that seemed to hold a good temperature when I tried smoking fish over the weekend and it went well. I even got excited and threw in a cooked left over chicken breast and a ham steak that came in a pack of 3 that came from Costco, all were excellent, the ham steak was fanstastic!

    I will try one of the hi-mountain mixes first, I am familiar with them as I have done some duck jerky in my oven in the past and have had good batched and bad batches but it was more of the duck than the process. Those mixes seem like a good place to start.

    The time and temperature advices is very helpful, looks like I need a good evening of prep to cure and then a day to keep an eye on it smoking.

    I am going to prep some babyback ribs tonight for an evening smoke tomorrow. I was just going to put a rub/spices on it, wrap it in foil and smoke it around 200 degrees for 2-3 hours, taking off the foil for the last hour or so. I like a heavy smoke, I figure this should allow for a good smoky flavor and all for the ribs to be tender.

    Any helpful tips for ribs???

    Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    For me... with babybacks, I usually don't wrap in foil. For the thicker rib cuts (St Louis style), I wrap them for 45 mins at the end of the process to get more heat into the meat, and then unwrap them again for the last phase of smoking. Like to give the ribs a good brushing with apple juice/rib sauce frequently during the cooking process. Making me hungry.

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    I have been doing a little research and am thinking of trying the 3-2-1 or 2-2-1 method, 2-3 hrs of smoke, 2 hours of foil with a little moisture to tenderize then 1 hour of no foil to firm them back up. Ever tried that method, seems to be a lot of success with that.

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