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Thread: Non resident bow hunting certificate?

  1. #1
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    Default Non resident bow hunting certificate?

    So I think I understand that non residents must have a bow hunting training certificate only when hunting in "Archery only" areas? Is that true? Where would those areas be?
    Non-Resident Hunters

    All bowhunters must have a Bowhunter Education Certification Card on their person while bow hunting in all "archery only" areas of Alaska. Alaska accepts the NBEF or IBEP Certification Cards from any State/Province sponsored "bowhunter education specific" courses (not combination classes). Other state's bowhunting licenses, tags, stamps, age exemptions, etc. are not adequate to fulfill Alaska's requirements.
    If you need a course before coming to Alaska please visit the National Bowhunter Education Foundation website for classes near you. Alaska courses fill quickly and you should not expect to be able to attend one without early registration.

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    Along the Dalton is one bow only area

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  3. #3

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    The need for a bowhunter certification applies to everyone (resident or non-resident) anywhere or during any time that it is a "weapons restricted" or "archery only" hunt. Any time you see a designation for an area (such as the 5-mile corridor of the Dalton Highway as mentioned above) or a time frame/season as "weapons restricted" or "archery" or "bow and arrow", then you are required to have a bowhunting certification such as IBEP. The only times you are NOT required to have a certification are if the hunt is open to rifle hunting and you are just choosing to use a bow. Essentially, if a bow is required by regs to participate in the hunt, you need to be certified.

  4. #4

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    That seems like an odd stipulation. I would think it would be required to have a Bowhunter Certification anytime you were hunting with a bow. I guess that makes too much sense. Anyway, to the OP, we don't have the certification here in Kansas currently so I had to go over to Missouri and take a course there. Fairly painless all-day Saturday course. It is worth it to just get the cert if you can. Most or all states will move to it eventually I would imagine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by colonel00 View Post
    That seems like an odd stipulation. I would think it would be required to have a Bowhunter Certification anytime you were hunting with a bow. I guess that makes too much sense. Anyway, to the OP, we don't have the certification here in Kansas currently so I had to go over to Missouri and take a course there. Fairly painless all-day Saturday course. It is worth it to just get the cert if you can. Most or all states will move to it eventually I would imagine.
    I actually don't agree with any of the bow certification requirements, much less making it universal to all bow hunt use. Posts 2 and 3 are correct as far as I know. I've taken it, and it was painless but several of the guys that "passed" that day in my estimation were not ready to take on the responsiblity. Nothing replaces mentorship and practice, not even an IBEP card, especially when the animal doesn't just flop over and one actually has to track it. This doesn't mean I want to see even more requirements, just that folks need to understand the difference in this hunting choice vs rifle hunting and take it seriously and apprentice themselves with some of the great bow guys out there.

  6. #6

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    I can't disagree with you at all. The course I took was literally just sitting in a room for 8 hours listening to people talk about ethical hunting and an extended Q&A with game wardens. Very little (from what I remember at least) actually dealt with bow hunting beyond basic safety and maybe a little bit about best practices. There was no proficiency test or even handling of a bow. The only thing we went outside for was to do a mediocre ranging exercise.

  7. #7

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    to add the issue with proficiency tests is they're only relevant to the time it was taken. a year, later you may not be able to hit the broad side of the dirt your walking on! The course is flawed...I wont get into it, I have in other posts.

    To the op, that is correct..you only need it for bow only areas. There are multiple hunts that are bow only. The Dalton is obviously the biggest and most talked about..its bow only for everything right down to the small game. There's sheep and elk tags...a moose hunt in Fairbanks..there used to be a bow only hunt in anchorage before enough bad publicity had it shut down. I know there are other hunts around the state.

    You do NOT need the bowhunter ed to hunt OUTSIDE of bow only areas!!!!

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    Yeah, seems odd that it would only be fore bow only areas. What about all of the other hunters using bows the rest of the time?? Thanks for the input guys.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by razorsharptokill View Post
    Yeah, seems odd that it would only be fore bow only areas. What about all of the other hunters using bows the rest of the time?? Thanks for the input guys.
    I don't have any numbers to back this up, but I would doubt there really are many people out bow hunting during the regular rifle season or in rifle hunting areas that are not certified. By far, a vast majority of hunters during a rifle hunting season/area will hunt by rifle. You will occasionally find a bow hunter, but those are almost always the more hard-core archery hunters who will almost certainly be certified already. I'm sure there are some, but the numbers are most likely very low.

  10. #10
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    You need hunter education to hunt Alaska. If you hunt somewhere that only bows are legal at the time, then you need bowhunter education. It's pretty simple.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeeterMan View Post
    You need hunter education to hunt Alaska. If you hunt somewhere that only bows are legal at the time, then you need bowhunter education. It's pretty simple.
    While correct about bow hunting, not everyone at this time is required to have hunter education. Only those under a certain age (born after a certain date) are required to have it and some specific hunt areas require it for everyone, but older hunters outside of those areas are not required to have it. Details on page 13 of the hunting regs found here: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...fs/general.pdf

  12. #12
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Here you can hunt in city limits but can't discharge firearm so bow is nice and no class needed.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  13. #13
    Member Ken R's Avatar
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    Slippery slope on what should be required. I agree that the certs don't go far enough, but where do you draw the line? Lots of unqualified rifle hunters out there also--should they have to do a proficiency test? Get a certificate for long range shooting --certified to 200 yds/300 yds/etc...? Should a tracking certificate be required? How about an outdoor skills test? Physical conditioning endorsement for sheep/goat? Most ethical hunters know their limitations already--the only thing more certifications will do (besides placing more burden on the already ethical hunters and F&G) is that it might weed out some that wouldn't be there and still will be some that lack the skills/ethics that take the course. I'm not a fan of more regs/hurdles.

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