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Thread: Wiring in "things"

  1. #1
    Member sisusuomi's Avatar
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    Default Wiring in "things"

    First off I've never owned a salt water boat, but I've had two sleds and two water ski boats and all 4 were purchased used and all 4 were wiring nightmares. The boat we have now is brand spanking new and the wiring is a WHOLE lot nicer than the previous 4. I've been reading as much on wiring as I can on line from the hull truth but I want to check with Alaskans not Florida sun runners.

    A. Here is what I learned:
    1. always use tinned marine wire (this was a new one by me and I'm glad I've done so much reading even though my wife says I spend too much time on the Internet)
    2a. some guys advocate using shrink tubing with glue inside for a water tight seal. Anchor shrink tubing is one brand I read about and there is another but basically they are the same. Only negative I've read is it's a real booger to get off once it's on.
    2b. another guy recommends using regular shrink tubing and then taking a vet syringe with dulled 16 ga needle and injecting Dow Corning 4 Electrical Insulating Compound via one of the ends.
    regarding his section is it over kill or good idea to use 2a or 2b. I'm kind of leaning toward 2b

    B. New subject but still has to do with electrical and mechanical just not splicing, but corrosion protection.
    1.My son lives on the Big Island of Hawaii and he and his friends all use one or two of these products that they apply to any exposed electrical panels under dash, in the transom area, battery terminals, any hinges or metal parts that are accessible to apply treatment.
    a. Boeshield T-9=this one seems to be used for everything on the boat: metal, electrical
    b. Corrosion X=this one seems to be used for everything from the trailer to the boat: metal, electrical
    c. Corrosion Block=this one from want I'm seeing is only for metal not any electrical
    d. LPS lube from LPS labs
    This section again I'm leaning toward the Boeshield T-9 but not 100% sold, so just looking for advice.

    Thank you, Scott

  2. #2
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I would not mess with a needle and injection. Just go down to arctic wire and supply and get several different sizes of heat shrink with the glue in it - comes in all colors and sizes (not cheap) and use that.

    Corrosion X is sposed be the cat's meow of the salt water corrosion jungle - read the label - it'll cure darn near everything.. I bought a couple cans of different type - I don't know that it is much different than any other good sticky lubricant - yet.

  3. #3
    Member AK Fishkiller's Avatar
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    As an electrician, I agree...just buy the shrink with the glue....and a side note, if you buy ring, forks, or splice terminals always buy the ones that have the shrink with the glue. I've seen the regular one's corrode internally and create resistance to allow voltage drops that can damage equipment. Get the best, spend the money...this way you do it once and in the long run it can be cheaper....my last boat, regular ring terminals, and the ground side failed, it used this little tiny ground wire in the heater as ground, needless to say....poof there went the circuit board....I was able to repair the terminal and replace the 300 dollar board, all over a 2 dollar ring terminal.

    Corrosion X.....X2 on this as well, always clean connections then coat them when done, of course dialectric grease between connections is always a good thing too, just don't use a ton......

    Hope this helps....John
    It's better to burn out than fade away.....

  4. #4
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    I've used a lot of the stuff you've mentioned. DC-4 is good stuff, but it's not for exposed terminals. Use DC-4 inside connections. For example, put some DC-4 on all of the pins of a Molex type connector, then connect the two ends. Put it on the terminals of your VHF transciever or GPS/Sonar type equipment, then connect the power wire. If you put it on exposed terminals, such as the such as those found on circuit breakers, it will just wash off over time. In those places (c/b terminals, lighting terminals, etc,use your standard RTV and cover the connection completely. This will block out the moisutre required for corrosion to occur. I've used this method, as well as DC-4 described above on both boats and aircraft (commercial airliners and bush planes) with success for many many years.

    The heat shrink with the adhesive in it, known as meltable wall heat shrink, is definitely the way to go. You'll need a heat gun of course, as your wife's hair dryer may not cut it.

    LPS lube comes in a variety of types for different uses. In aviation, we use LPS3 (very similar to Corrosion X I believe) in fasteners that are in areas prone to corrosion. In this way, we put 20 or so screws, bolt, nuts, whatever, in a zip lock bag and spray a liberal amount of LPS3 into the bag, then shake the bag vigorously to ensure all parts are coated. (Similar to Shake N Bake) Then install as normal.

    LPS1 is equivalent similar to WD40 and can be used in a similar manner. LPS2 is thicker than 1. Most of what gets used is either 1 or 3. (LPS also removes decal adhesive very well; just spray it on the sticky surface and wipe it off.)

    LPS also make something called CFCFree which is a great electrical contact cleaner. It works much like brake cleaner. (And is as harful to plastics as brake cleaner.) Also, try Deoxit as a corrosion remover.

  5. #5
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    I know you are in Juneau but try Frigid North [http://www.frigidn.com/] here in Anchorage for all electrical needs.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  6. #6
    Member sisusuomi's Avatar
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    Thank you very much for the input, so much appreciated.

  7. #7

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    http://www.genuinedealz.com/

    Free shipping. Very good, made in the USA wire.

  8. #8

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    No one's mentioned it yet but since you're looking for info, buy the expensive ratcheting crimper, the 3 dollar models kinda suck. The ratcheting crimper applies the correct crimping pressure. Once you use one you won't look back. Also, Polar wire sells a variety of heat shrink connectors with solder in them to insure a positive electrical contact, important if using the cheapo crimpers.
    Heat guns are awesome but most of the time I don't have ac power anywhere near my boat so I use a small butane torch/soldering gun. Great in very small places, doesn't require ac power. Watch out for too much heat or burning the connection at first but it's easy to master.
    Oh yeah, one other crucial thing more important than having tinned wire; use the correct gauge of wire for the application and also match fuses accordingly. Electrical fires are not that unusual on boats and seems they all have to to with overloaded circuits. Even "factory" boats can fall short in this area.
    Check out Quickwater Adventure water taxi/transport services: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quick...37553606260978

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    As a guy who's wired a lot of new boats as well as rewired old POS boats, the advice is very simple...

    Absolutely, always use tinned marine grade Anchor wire and be sure that you're using at least minimum gauge or a gauge higher for the maximum load of your device. You can (and should) get your Anchor wire in proper color coding for the devices that you are wiring. Yep, it will cost more as you have to buy more spools of wire. But 13 years from now when you're lying in the bilge trying to figure out an electrical problem, you'll be grateful for taking this extra step up front.

    Always use adhesive lined heat shrink tubing. There is nothing that can be "injected" into a connection after the fact that works.

    Never use crimp connections. Ever. Always solder your connections and then cover them with adhesive lined heat shrink tubing. All crimped connections will eventually fail.

    Use power distribution bars up high in spray-protected locations. Fuse or CB every circuit separately. Install a bigger distribution panel than you think you need and never tap power for a new device off an existing connection.

    Thoroughly coat your power distribution bar, the wire terminals, and the screws themselves with dielectric silicone grease. When cleaning up your boat every Spring, recoat every connection with fresh dielectric silicone grease. As long as air, water, and salt can't get to the metal parts of your wiring, it will never corrode.

    The absolute worst and stupidest electrical invention ever made is the crimp on power tap. If you ever come across one of those little blue devils, you should immediately grab a pair of pliers, rip out the metal crimping tab to disable it, and then split the plastic portion open and break it into 3 pieces. Put each piece into a separate trash can just be be sure that it will not bring any bad juju upon your other electrical components.

    Run positive and ground wires to all your stuff. Don't use metal boats as a chassis ground electrical connection. All electrical should be completely isolated from the hull.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Can't rep ya again Joat.......but I appreciate the write up.
    BK

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post

    Don't use metal boats as a chassis ground electrical connection. All electrical should be completely isolated from the hull.

    The AC electrical system earth should be bonded to the hull because:-

    1. The European Recreational Craft Directive says so.

    2. The British Marine Electronics Association "Code of Practice" says so.

    3. The book "The Boatowners Electrical and Mechanical Manual" by Nigel Calder (a world renowned expert) says so.

    4. The ABYC (American Boat and Yacht Council) recommends so.

    I do not think it a good idea to not have a hull that is not grounded. It just one mans opinion.

  12. #12
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Everything should be bonded to the motor! The motor is bolted to the hull so in actuality you are grounded to the hull too. only way to isolate the motor from the hull would be rubber coupling to the pump an rubber motor mounts.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  13. #13
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Bonding to the hull is not the same as using the hull as one of your conducting legs. Running two wires to each DC gizmo to complete the circuit is far better than running one wire and relying on a chassis ground to carry the return path. That doesn't mean the hull isn't tied to ground at some point (which is unavoidable), you're just not using it as a wire to carry your current.

    AC and DC are pretty different critters... btw.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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