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Thread: Power Auger Questions

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Default Power Auger Questions

    Sorry if these questions are redundant, I've looked through six pages and didn't find what I was after.

    I own a strikemaster 8" hand auger, I'm getting too lazy to cut through thick ice with it and want portability when the first spot is too slow. Two years ago I bought a used electric auger off craigslist, and can't get it to drill a hole more than a couple of inches. It just spins. I think the blades are beveled appropriately, but not 100% sure of it. Also, it's very old - might just be tired.

    That said, I find myself in the market for a power auger. I hate the idea of an iffy/hard to start motor. I've got three chainsaws and a weedeater that cause occasional grief. I dread adding another +/- $400 small engine to my garage if it's going to require much maintainence. In fact, I've even looked into the chainsaw ice auger attachment http://www.lewiswinch.com/multidrill/Ice_Augers.html


    For skeptics, there are some sweet electric augers that work.http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104395680
    I have wondered why the electric clam conversion would not work with a corded drill. In the recent discussion about hand augers, everyone mentioned the drawback is draining 18v batteries. Does a truck or suv generate enough power (I'm no electrician but I believe the issue would be generating enough amps) to run a stout corded drill, transferring that energy to a clam?

    If I go with gas, are there machines worth avoiding? Of course I could buy anything local, I will also be in a cabelas in less than a month. If I have to I can look into checking the box on the plane, or shipping it up with a friend. From what I can gather the jiffy propane augers and nils get the best reviews, eskimo seems to be a step down, and strikemaster is a bit of a gamble - depending on the motor. Anyone have any enlightening perspectives?

    Thanks

    edit:
    I guess I should mention right now I am leaning toward the eskimo mako 43cc 8"
    My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

  2. #2
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    Sorry if these questions are redundant, I've looked through six pages and didn't find what I was after.

    I own a strikemaster 8" hand auger, I'm getting too lazy to cut through thick ice with it and want portability when the first spot is too slow. Two years ago I bought a used electric auger off craigslist, and can't get it to drill a hole more than a couple of inches. It just spins. I think the blades are beveled appropriately, but not 100% sure of it. Also, it's very old - might just be tired.

    That said, I find myself in the market for a power auger. I hate the idea of an iffy/hard to start motor. I've got three chainsaws and a weedeater that cause occasional grief. I dread adding another +/- $400 small engine to my garage if it's going to require much maintainence. In fact, I've even looked into the chainsaw ice auger attachment http://www.lewiswinch.com/multidrill/Ice_Augers.html


    For skeptics, there are some sweet electric augers that work.http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104395680
    I have wondered why the electric clam conversion would not work with a corded drill. In the recent discussion about hand augers, everyone mentioned the drawback is draining 18v batteries. Does a truck or suv generate enough power (I'm no electrician but I believe the issue would be generating enough amps) to run a stout corded drill, transferring that energy to a clam?

    If I go with gas, are there machines worth avoiding? Of course I could buy anything local, I will also be in a cabelas in less than a month. If I have to I can look into checking the box on the plane, or shipping it up with a friend. From what I can gather the jiffy propane augers and nils get the best reviews, eskimo seems to be a step down, and strikemaster is a bit of a gamble - depending on the motor. Anyone have any enlightening perspectives?

    Thanks

    edit:
    I guess I should mention right now I am leaning toward the eskimo mako 43cc 8"
    I was in your shoes last year...Strikemaster on its last legs. I bought an Eskimo Z71, 10" and have drilled hundreds of holes with it. It always starts on the first or second pull, never fail.

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    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    I would stay away from propane. Eskimo jiffy strikemaster they are all decent. Personally I like strike master. Dad gave me one thy he bought 15 years ago and it's still running today. I would get which ever one has more metal on it. Plastic is going to break in the cold. I have watched fly wheels expload in the cold


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    Member cptmorganusn's Avatar
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    An option might be just a new power head as long as your auger bit is still ok. You can get those at alaska industrial for cheaper than a whole new system.

    I just bought a brand new mako 43cc 10", it works great. However, getting it started for the first time on each trip (cold start) is a little tricky, maybe it's just mine though. But I have to give it a little gas while pulling the cord, but with a buddy there it's pretty easy. But when it does start, it cuts through the ice like butter and then warm starts are on the first pull each time.


    I love hooking.

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    if you take care of it , they will last you a long time [ mine 35 yrs ]
    fresh gas at the first of the season clean an gap the plug , most of the units today
    have a CD on the plug , put one on mine a couple of years back [ it helped a lot ] after each trip empty the tank an run dry , [ don't know when you get out again ]
    the SYN oil for snow mobiles is great for the mix, an some people don't do a thing to there augers but I do , PS before going out make sure it works at home , every time
    easer to fix at home then out at the pond an -10 deg F. try an stay away from plastic as much as you can still need a plastic tank but that is about all , SID

  6. #6
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    I bought a 10" Eskimo Mako for myself as a birthday present this year. I pulled and pumped and jerked and cussed for 20-25 minutes the first night trying to get it to start on the driveway. I was certain that my terrible luck with outboards and small engines in General had carried over to my auger purchase, but just when I was about to give up she sputtered and coughed and came to life. I was so excited I ran it for another 15min on my driveway, even killing it and restarting it a half a dozen times before putting it away. I still don't have the clutch completely broken in but I can feel it starting to transfer more torque so I think after the next time on the ice it will be good to go. But since the first night of it driving me nuts trying to start it, it has busted right off on the first or second pull even cold.
    I got mine at AIH earlier this month and they were having a sale, might be worth checking there for better pricing.

  7. #7
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I have several augers.
    An 8" Mako (starts first pull but there is a lot of plastic on it) if you buy one and snowmobile to your fishing locations make sure to strap the power head to your sled.
    Older Strikemaster Cobra. All metal and bullet proof. Doesn't like to start @ -40.

    Older Tanaka. This thing is the bees knees!!! Starts and runs well and is all metal plus it's very light.

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    Member Bgarcher44's Avatar
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    Brand affiliation is all subjective. The vipers have a lot of plastic parts to include the recoil starter which will break in colder temps. Viper must know their products are subject to breaking in cold weather because their brand specific replacement parts are made of metal. The vipers that I've owned/used generally struggled to start/run in colder temps (-20). The auger I currently run is an older strikemaster (20+ yrs old) which is built for colder temps with exception to the plastic gas tank (no issues so far). The strikemaster will start and run in the colder weather and has yet to leave me high and dry in the interior. Just my 2 cents!!

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    I have an eskimo z71 and it starts on the first or second pull and as long as you use the compression release button you will have no problems even at temps down to 30 below getting it started


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    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Thanks for the opinions. I picked up the 43cc Eskimo today for $280 with the sportsmans sale.
    My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

  11. #11
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    Thanks for the opinions. I picked up the 43cc Eskimo today for $280 with the sportsmans sale.
    Thats a pretty good price.
    Death is like an old whore in a bar--I'll buy her a drink but I won't go upstairs with her.

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    as you can see every one is using them an they all work , just use fresh GAS use SYN 2 stroke oil [ snowmobile ] an drain the tank an insert fresh gas
    realey helps on the life of the unit I think , SID

  13. #13
    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    Older Strikemaster Cobra. All metal and bullet proof. Doesn't like to start @ -40.
    That's the same one dad gave me and its a Beast. Think stock it came with a 10 3/4 inch bit but it broke right before I moved up here. Got a brand new 8" for it and it melts the ice away


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  14. #14

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    You said a fatal mistake many of us have had. It spins and spins and spins.

    If your blades are sharp...somethings BENT! If its still spinning, it has nothing to do with age.

    Its blade angles, or bracket angles. Something's is off. The bevel on the blades may be spot on, the bevel on the mounting bracket may be off a few degrees. Or visa versa, your blade angles might be off enough its not biting. or flat out its just dull.

    You can try shimming the blades at the top end with a piece of roofing tin/pop can etc. Its likely the angle itself is off. or the blades themselves are off. either way it cant hurt. Now if you find the angle and the head cant cut, (assuming you have sharp blades) than the power head itself may be the culprit but I'd be surprised that's it.

    People do regularly beat their heads back down. ie..... you start cutting, the head stops cutting you lift it up and drop it back down again hard...you can bend the brackets holding the blades in some models. If its not bent its blade angles or it's just dull! (do I sound like a broken recorder yet lol)

    I know in my jiffy when she doesn't want to cut the pilot spud needs sharpening and the blades need sharpened also.

    IMHO instead of blowing 400 to 600 bucks on a GOOD auger, I think with a little playing the one you have will work just fine.

    Now if you want new...I will say stay away from plastic! MANY of the new heads have more non metal pieces than I care to play with. I love my jiffy 3110, it does give me fits every now and than....and like I found out this year my blades were dull, duh on me lol. I haven't fished much the last two winters to my own disclaimer.

    I'm not a fan of eskimo's or at least the few mods I've played with in recent years.

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