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Thread: A little motivation

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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    Default A little motivation

    Ok so I'm trying to get my dad to go with me on hunting trip this fall (fly out caribou on the north slope) he was really for it back at Christmas but now is kinda backing out. Mostly cause he had knee replacement early November and I think at Christmas felt like he was getting better and now he is in the hard streach of not seeing a lot of improvement each day. Anyways I was wondering if others had similar experiences? And if they feel that a hunt like this May be too much for this kinda surgery or if you think he'll be fine. I've been pushing for this hunt so he stays motivated to do his therapy.

    Thanks

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I will be watching this thread as I'm in need of a knee replacement myself. I have spoken with numerous folks that have had it done and just about all are doing things they did 20 years before and only wish they had it done sooner. '

    That said each and everyone has stressed how important it is to follow through with physical therapy, they say it is vital to prevent adhesion of the scar tissue.

    I would encourage him to go, will give him motivation to stick to rehab and even if he is not up for any hiking, I have killed many critters while I was sitting around the fire at a remote camp.

    I would rather limp around a campfire than sit on a couch any day!

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKducks View Post
    Ok so I'm trying to get my dad to go with me on hunting trip this fall (fly out caribou on the north slope) he was really for it back at Christmas but now is kinda backing out. Mostly cause he had knee replacement early November and I think at Christmas felt like he was getting better and now he is in the hard streach of not seeing a lot of improvement each day. Anyways I was wondering if others had similar experiences? And if they feel that a hunt like this May be too much for this kinda surgery or if you think he'll be fine. I've been pushing for this hunt so he stays motivated to do his therapy.


    Thanks
    I was about 65 when I finally got my knee replacement. Also on the 1st of Nov. In that we live in a 3 level house, I had to negotiate a small flight of stairs all the time which probably helped. However, I didn't miss a session of PT, and always tried to exceed the minimum expected of me. I've enjoyed 10 moose seasons, a couple caribou hunts, and chased a lot of snow shoe hare and ptarmigan with my son and grandson's since. And as Stid mentioned, my biggest regret was not insisting on a replacement much much earlier... I'd have saved myself a lot of misery.

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    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I will be watching this thread as I'm in need of a knee replacement myself. I have spoken with numerous folks that have had it done and just about all are doing things they did 20 years before and only wish they had it done sooner. '

    That said each and everyone has stressed how important it is to follow through with physical therapy, they say it is vital to prevent adhesion of the scar tissue.

    I would encourage him to go, will give him motivation to stick to rehab and even if he is not up for any hiking, I have killed many critters while I was sitting around the fire at a remote camp.

    I would rather limp around a campfire than sit on a couch any day!

    Steve
    Steve, the procedure is proven and guaranteed to make your life better. The real battle is to get passed the psychological trauma of having something so invasive done to you. It takes a lot of brain power just to make the decision to have it done, and then it takes real mettle to physically go that that hospital on the day of the operation and see it through. We are conditioned out entire lives to avoid injury and pain, so it takes a sound mind (or a crazy one) to decide to let someone rip and cut your flesh apart to "fix" you. Good luck, but you don't need it.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PacWestFishTaxidermy View Post
    Steve, the procedure is proven and guaranteed to make your life better. The real battle is to get passed the psychological trauma of having something so invasive done to you. It takes a lot of brain power just to make the decision to have it done, and then it takes real mettle to physically go that that hospital on the day of the operation and see it through. We are conditioned out entire lives to avoid injury and pain, so it takes a sound mind (or a crazy one) to decide to let someone rip and cut your flesh apart to "fix" you. Good luck, but you don't need it.
    I hear ya,, but after enduring a failed back surgery and having it redone. I'm just not as quick to let those saw bones whittle on me again,, well that and I made the mistake of watching it on youtube. But I'm at the point where I know I can't put it off much longer.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I don't know how old your Dad is and I didn't have knee replacement surgery, but I did have surgery for a badly torn meniscis a couple years ago in my early 50s. Even with that minor surgery I thought it was going to be a breeze but after a few weeks I realized I wasn't going to heal as fast as I had hoped. But after awhile the pain went away and I was in fact x-country skiing with my daughter and working out for an upcoming goat hunt. Glad to say that all is well and I'll still be climbing up mountains for awhile. He just needs to stay on the PT, eat well, and try and keep the positive thoughts, and all will be fine.

    My Dad was a healthy 70 year old when I had the chance come for us both to do an elk hunt down in CO. that we'd always wanted to do since as long as I could remember. At that age he had a hard time committing and wouldn't give me an answer. Finally I just grabbed the bull by the horns and set it all up....THEN I called him and told him. He said "let's do it" and we did. We had a wonderful time and am so glad we did go, as a couple years later we lost dad to walking pneumonia. It ended up being the last hunt we had together.

    Tell your Dad that even if he has to spend a lot of time in camp, you need to make it happen. The both of you will be glad you did.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Steve....My mom-in-law had the first knee replacement in her late 60s and then had the other knee done a couple years after that. Believe me, she's not a real healthy lady as she doesn't eat that well, nor exercise much, but she took it on and came through it with flying colors. She too thought she wouldn't need the PT, but that only lasted a few days as she realized she'd have to get on it if she planned on doing the things she still wanted to do.

    We're the same age Steve and from the way I know you from here.....the healthy way you eat and exercise, I have no doubt that you'll do fine. The thing is, and like you and others have said, you'll probably cuss yourself that you hadn't done it sooner. But, then again, from what my mom-in-law told me, the docs do say to put it off as long as you can because they do kinda have a "shelf life" so to speak, so hopefully they will last the rest of your life. Put it off yes, but not to the point that you're in constant pain.

    Get after it Steve.....you still have a lot of sheep hunts left in ya...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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