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Thread: Halibut rods and reels for older folks

  1. #1
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    Default Halibut rods and reels for older folks

    I want to set up halibut rods/reels for my folks who are 70. Any tips on rod styles / types that older folks seem to have an easier, more enjoyable time fishing with would be helpful. Also tips on belts or rod holders or other things that make golden age fishing more comfortable.
    Thanks,
    QF

  2. #2
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Shoulder strap or harness - Changes everything.




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  3. #3

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    Lightweight jig rods like the Okuma Cedros or the Shimano Trevala. Reels work best with the crank on the left side if they're right handed, right side if their left. Go with levelwind too. They get a better grab on the foregrip if they're not having to tend line onto the reel. We have a number of guests each year in their 70's and a wide range of rods/reels on the boat. Those I described are their perpetual favorites.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    What's your budget?

    If you really want to make it enjoyable I'd get a daiwa seaborg reel.

    And you don't have to be in your 70's to enjoy a good jigging rod vs. a tuna stick.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Brown bear that's exactly the info I was after. How much weight can you jig on a cedros?
    Thank
    QF

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    A 2 speed reel will help a lot , with a 4.5 to 5.5 FT rod your pocket is what is left if you are going to build a rod for them go sprial wrap it won't
    twist on them [ roll over ] when they get a fish on, PS:::: a lever wind on the reel also will help SID

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiet Fisherman View Post
    Brown bear that's exactly the info I was after. How much weight can you jig on a cedros?
    Thank
    QF
    Depends on the weight class. I personally prefer the 6-6.5' length in the 65-150# range...it will jig 2 pounds very nice but has no gimble. The 80-200# has the gimbal but transmits the weight back to person a bit more.

    I personally like spinning reels for those that don't have a lot of arm strength. With a conventional you have to balance it while you crank and a spinning reel stays put...and can be cranked on either side. Two good quality ones I use are the Fin-Nor Offshore series and the Quantum Boca series. And yes, there is a Cedros in the spinning configuration that is rated 50-100#s and is a nice rod for everything from silvers on divers to halibut and rockfish.


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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiet Fisherman View Post
    How much weight can you jig on a cedros?
    We use darts to 16 oz and rubbertails to 24 oz, but the old folks sure hate to use the 24's. No complaints at all about 16 oz, but that sezz more about the the oldsters than the rods. Never tried anything heavier than 24, but I'm betting they'd do it just fine.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quiet Fisherman View Post
    Brown bear that's exactly the info I was after. How much weight can you jig on a cedros?
    Thank
    QF
    All rods will have a range of weights that they jig most effectively. I don't have my cedros handy but it's sweet spot is with jigs in the 8-12 oz range with still pretty action for 16 oz jigs. On the trevala rods the XH works best with 6-12 oz, the XXH 8-16 oz. I do have 24 oz jigs and use them occasionally but they really load up the rod and you're expending alot of effort just flexing the rod.

    With a jig too light the rod barely flexes and it's tought to impart a good jigging action. When I drop down to the 4 oz jigs I go with a salmon rod.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Lightweight jig rods like the Okuma Cedros or the Shimano Trevala. Reels work best with the crank on the left side if they're right handed, right side if their left. Go with levelwind too. They get a better grab on the foregrip if they're not having to tend line onto the reel. We have a number of guests each year in their 70's and a wide range of rods/reels on the boat. Those I described are their perpetual favorites.
    Totally agree with you ... have two of those rods and reels and have landed 120 + lb butts without even thinking about grsbbing the rod holder belt. They lift the rod ... it stays close to the persons center of gravity and guess what they lean back and the rod comes up and the collect line on the way down.

    Awsome combination for big fish ...

  11. #11
    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    I'm not in my 70's, but I'm close to it. We use Offshore Angler, Ocean Master standup rods, and Penn International VSX reels. We load the reels with Tuff Line. You can put 400 yards of 80# Tuff Line on these reels and really don't have to worry about line keeping. The rods have a triangular shaped fore grip which fits nicely into the hand. The reels are two speed and the handle is large and easy to grip. My wife and I both have arthritis in our hands and these rigs are easy to use.

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