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Thread: Cabin kits

  1. #1
    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Default Cabin kits

    Has anyone had any luck with these cabin kits that are advertised? I'm aware of a couple like SBS and Friesens custom cabins in Palmer. Personally I'm not real crazy about what I've read on the SBS kits. Any info on the other or possibly ones I'm not aware of. Thanks
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  2. #2

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    Check out this guy's prices. I've looked at some of his cabins and I think he is reasonably priced for cabin kits.

    http://www.timberlinelogcabins.com

    I think I am just going to order the logs from Poppert Milling and order the framing separately from SBS myself. I think I will be able to save a little bit of money this way. The one down side, is the logs from Poppert Milling need to be peeled. But if I was to go with a log cabin package, I think I would go with this guy. The logs are not scribe fit, but for the price the quality isn't that bad in my opinion.

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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Thank you! I wasn't really thinking a log cabin but those prices don't seem to bad
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  4. #4

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    I put my 12x16 together for about $1500. Most of these kits I see advertised are outrageous.


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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Steve View Post
    I put my 12x16 together for about $1500. Most of these kits I see advertised are outrageous.


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    Thanks Steve. I haven't gotten to the point of comparing what a kit vs buying material outright would be yet. Mostly still in the ideas and planning stages right now. I would like to find some sets of detailed plans though so I could price out material...
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Steve View Post
    I put my 12x16 together for about $1500. Most of these kits I see advertised are outrageous.


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    Do you mean $15,000? I doubt anyone could build a 12 X 16 uninsulated shed for $1500. Unless you have some kind of 90% discount from SBS that we don't know about. I'd wager that $1500 would only cover the cost of the floor on a nice cabin.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    you can ALWAYS put a kit together cheaper then you can buy a kit..

    when you take the time to build a materials list and submit it to BID to SBS, Lowes, Uresco, Home depot, etc.. you can get the best prices also.. often a lumber yard will meet or beat the deal the roofing company quoted you for their product too..

    its always best to figure a wall in incriments of 4 foot.. 8,12,16,20,24.. ext for sheeting.. the length of the wall is divided by two.. add 3, then add 4 for every window and door.. ( studs) you might have one or two left over at the end.. then add.. floor plates and top plates.. 20 foot wall would be 40 foot of floor/top plate 60 if you double the top like you should..

    sheeting is figured in sq foot.. and 8x24 wall is divided by 32 ( sqfoot of a sheet) do not subtract windows and doors. youll hurt it laters.. your gable ends are figured on a square.. if the cabin is 16 foot wide, and you have a 8 foot peak.. you figure 8x16 for sheeting that does both ends.

    log kits.. you figure the logs will extend 12-18 inches past the end. so you for a 20x24.. figure a 22x26x(number of row) 8 inch logs D style are 12-13 rows.. 6"D style are 15 -16 rows.. for an 8'+ high wall.. do not subtract doors and windows..

    floors and lofts are lenght divided by 2 added 2 pluse add three rows of full length for roll blocking.. rafters are the same ..

    anyway..

    thats PRETTY BASIC.. but it will get you 95% complete frame in ..

    insulation is quoted by sq foot. so is roofing .. and it only cost a few bucks to add sq foot vs having one two small.. a 20 foot wall takes 11 studs.. a 24 foot wall takes 13.. with an extra 8 bucks in studs and 15 bucks in sheeting.. you just added 4 foot to the cabin..


    Northland wood here in Fairbanks has an ONLINE price list.. its give per board and by the foot.. to give you and idea as to HOW to figure things out.. YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND IT CHEAPER THEN THEY SELL IT> but its a TOOL..
    www.northlandwood.com

    I planned packages for folks i built for for years.. you find that it might take some time but youll save upwards of 40% on the kit too..

    hope it helps..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Vince, thanks a lot for posting. Great info. }:>
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    Nope. I meant $1500. I got an old torn down shed with enough 2Xs and to frame my walls and about half my sheeting, plus a brand new steel door with a window and frame for $150. I scored all my wall and roof insulation for $100. I picked up all my metal roofing for $200 for the cabin, ,the outhouse, adn the woodshed. I scored 5 sheets of t&G 3/4" flooring for free. I got all my windows for free. I have combo wood/coal/diesel heater for $100. If you have a little patience and are willing to dig around there are bargains to be had. the stuff I do have to buy was pretty vigoroulsy value engineered. I downloaded Draftsight and drafted up my barn roof loft using precut 2x6s and 8ft 2x4s. the geometry save me several hundred dollars over my first designs. I have a fairly detailed bill of materials that I'm keeping. We'll see what the tally is, but even if I just went to home depot and bought everything I need to finish it I'll be right at $1700. I can share the cad drawings if anyone wants them.

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    Member ADUKHNT's Avatar
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    There has been some previous discussion on this topic as well. Search forum for cabin plans or cabin kits. I shot you a PM as well. Good luck which ever way you decide to go.
    I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    This has all been great info. Thanks a lot guys. Especially Vince that info is priceless for me. So next question for cabin builders is what do you really wish you did or didn't do when building the cabin?
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  12. #12

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    I was talking to a local businessman today. He had some good advice after building several cabins. First, keep them square, as in 16 by 16, 20 by 20, etc. he thought 20 by 20 with a sleeping loft upstairs was an ideal size for a cabin. Don't bother with windows on the north side. Have lots of windows on teh south side. The space under your cabin is free. Build it up high so you can park and store stuff underneath. have a big deck, with at least part of it covered. Everyone will congregate on the deck. Make sure that the path to the outhouse isn't visible from the deck. the ladies appreciate this. A steep metal roof keeps the snow off your building. Porcupines love T-111, but hate cedar. Put cedar siding on everything.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    My 12/12 pitch metal roof didn't always shed snow. Up to 2 feet at times on the roof.

    Have a window on the north side IF there is a door to the outside. It sucks not to have a way to lookout before opening the door.

    Wire in outside lights. The 150W Halogen ones do NOT like generators.

    Don't make the path to the outhouse under the eaves. It could hurt someone if it sheds.

    If you have a loft, have a viable way to exit in case of fire.

    If a winter weekend cabin..... think massive BTUs to get it warmed up.

    You are going to have to clean that chimney, have a plan.

    Make the loft NO SHOES.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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  14. #14

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    Have "Bear'Boards" for the outside window sills, and on the floor outside the doors. Mice and voles will get through the smallest crack. Best to have a sliding barn type door on the outhouse. Don't put butt'wipe in the pooper'hole.

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Here are some generator friendly lights, very powerful!
    http://www.amazon.com/TSSS-Spotlight...=50w+led+flood
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
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  16. #16

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    What is a bear board?

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Steve View Post
    What is a bear board?
    They are boards you can put up when you leave that will keep the bears from trying to enter through that opening (window/door/etc...). Usually a good piece of plywood with tons of nails/screws through it, set so the sharp ends are pointing out.

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    Member cod's Avatar
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    I like long 'eves'. It keeps the snow a bit farther away from cabin and allows a place to walk and/or store things along the cabin out of the weather. (Not an issue so much if you're on pilings with crawl space obviously.)
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Steve View Post
    I was talking to a local businessman today. He had some good advice after building several cabins. First, keep them square, as in 16 by 16, 20 by 20, etc. he thought 20 by 20 with a sleeping loft upstairs was an ideal size for a cabin. Don't bother with windows on the north side. Have lots of windows on teh south side. The space under your cabin is free. Build it up high so you can park and store stuff underneath. have a big deck, with at least part of it covered. Everyone will congregate on the deck. Make sure that the path to the outhouse isn't visible from the deck. the ladies appreciate this. A steep metal roof keeps the snow off your building. Porcupines love T-111, but hate cedar. Put cedar siding on everything.
    Good notes. Square is most economical as it provides the maximum floor space for a fixed amount of linear wall. Although you could actaully get more floor space from a round cabin, but then you'd have to find some very bent logs.

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    Default Cabin kits

    You guys are overplaying the efficiency of a square, and for my personal tastes the aesthetics of a rectangular structure, as well as the functionality of having a longer S facing wall for windows providing natural light and passive heating, is well worth the slight, actually VERY slight, efficiency trade off.

    20 x 20 = 80' perimeter, 400 sq feet.
    16 x 24 = 80' perimeter, 388 sq feet
    17x24 = 82' perimeter,408 sq feet

    If the floor space taken up by a refrigerator is that worth it to you, go for it, but if this sort of efficiency is going to make or break the budget, well... i'll give you $10 if you need it. Add two more studs and you've got even bigger footprint, if you really need it. Obviously 17 is not a very practical dimension for stick framing, just pointing out that the efficiency being talked about is almost inconsequential, whereas having a long south facing wall makes for very real natural lighting gains, and there's just something about the aesthetics of a properly oriented rectangular house that is pleasing.


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