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Thread: sockeye jacks counted as escapement

  1. #1

    Default sockeye jacks counted as escapement

    I was reading through the public comments to the recent BOF meeting in Kodiak (see pc 10 pg 12)
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...ak_pc_1_20.pdf

    This fellow seems very perturbed and concerned with the number of jack sockeye being counted into Frazer Lake on Kodiak Is.
    It appears that jacks are being used to pad the books on escapement into this system.
    Escapement returns with as high as 70% jacks have been recorded and it appears 2 consequtive cycles are now averaging around 40% jacks in the escapements.
    This seems like pretty poor management as a normal policy. I have read where other healthy systems have jack escapements of 2-5%.
    Any theories on what would cause this or why they would be counted as viable escapement

  2. #2
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Why would they not be counted as viable escapement. They can viably reproduce just like any larger male. This would be akin to a tall human telling a dwarf he can't reproduce or he shouldn't reproduce.
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    The limiting factor in any population is females and sperm is cheap. Southeast Chinook populations are managed for "large" fish for their escapement goals for this reason. Above the prescribed length cut off you no longer have such a skewed sex ratio and you can get a clearer picture of actual production. This is not common throughout the state, kings in all northern rivers give as much count to a 20 inch jack as a 20 lb female.

    Salmon rivers are like a bar 15 minutes before closing time.....lots of guys lookin for a shot but in the end the girl always has the say.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    The limiting factor in any population is females and sperm is cheap. Southeast Chinook populations are managed for "large" fish for their escapement goals for this reason. Above the prescribed length cut off you no longer have such a skewed sex ratio and you can get a clearer picture of actual production. This is not common throughout the state, kings in all northern rivers give as much count to a 20 inch jack as a 20 lb female.
    I think you meant to say this is not uncommon....(?) I believe you're pointing out one of the (potentially several) fatal flaws in Alaska fisheries management tactics. My understanding is that the post first pulse Yukon King escapement numbers are known to be comprised of something like 45% jacks, yet this is not being properly (if at all) weighted in the reproduction projection calculations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    I think you meant to say this is not uncommon....(?) I believe you're pointing out one of the (potentially several) fatal flaws in Alaska fisheries management tactics. My understanding is that the post first pulse Yukon King escapement numbers are known to be comprised of something like 45% jacks, yet this is not being properly (if at all) weighted in the reproduction projection calculations.
    "This" refers to southeast management practices so indeed management for large fish is not common north of Yakutat, but I see the potential for confusion.

    Agreed on the flaw. As it is there is an assumption built into the management of northern stocks and counts of how many fish come back and an assumed constant component of young males.....which obviously isn't the case. (would work fine it it were constant and when production is not so dismal for salmon it has worked fine.....not so much in tough times.)

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