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Thread: Unit 25 caribou hunt

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    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Default Unit 25 caribou hunt

    My son, a friend, and myself have booked our transporter for an early caribou hunt in either Unit 25A or 25D, depending on where the animals are around the 5th of August. Looking for any input on what kind of weather to expect, and what type of shoes/boots/waders are best suited for the terrain. Knute

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    Hi Knute,

    Glad to hear you are coming back for another hunt.

    I roamed that country decades ago but haven't hunted it in years.

    The primary concern for caribou hunts is that the transporter must be flexible and prepared to drop you in front of the migrating herd. If your air-taxi has already determined where you will be placed, I'd be very skeptical.

    That's very early and there may be bugs yet!

    Good luck......Vern

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    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Hey Vern, thanks for the reply. We're flying with 70 North, and I think he flies a lot for the pipelines, or other oilfield business. Mike seemed to think he could get us on the bou. I know its early, but my son's teaching and football coaching schedule demands that we do a very early hunt. I know there could be issues with bugs, warm weather, and such, but those are just issues we will have to deal with and overcome. Knute

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Aug 5th seems early to find bou in decent numbers in unit 25. That time of year would be more a unit 26 hunt or so I would think.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  5. #5

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    Knute,

    I spend time with Mike every year and can tell you whatever you need to know about the area he flies.

    August 5 is early, but there will be other hunters and Mike and Bob will put you down near caribou. You might be in the foothills of the Brooks or "the swamp." There was no rhyme or reason last year to where the herd was and why they stayed without moving until late in the season.

    Bugs will be an issue and animals will all be in velvet. Take hip or waist waders. In either location they will likely be necessary. I would also take fishing gear. Depending on where you end up there is a good chance you will have access to char that time of year, and probably some grayling.

    Feel free to email me anytime if I can help with any additional information.

    Don Mulligan
    outdoorswithdon@aol.com

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    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. I have had print outs from several Units and Sub-Units laying around my desk, as I do my research, and my son brought it to my attention that I posted the wrong Unit in my original post. We will be hunting either 26B or C, depending on where the herd movement is. sorry for the confusion, and if anyone has information they would care to share on weather, gear, ect., it would be greatly appreciated. We have most of the basic camp gear, mainly needing to know what to expect and need in the way of footwear. Knute

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    If you are flying with Mike and Bob they will take great care of you I used them 2 seasons ago and they are great. You need to prepare for bugs that early with good net gear and as far as temps anything from 70 to snow on the north slope you never know. Boots I would def have hip waders at least. We were dropped near a river and wouldn't ya know it the bulls were across it we made 11 trips across that river packing meat in early sept with snow on the ground and no waders. Not fun well not at the time! We laugh now about it. Water everywhere up there.

  8. #8

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    We hunted up there last year - best piece of gear we took was a pack raft we used to cross the river we were on and ferry loads of caribou back to camp from a couple miles upstream.

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    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Bfish, what time of year was your hunt, and what kind of pack raft did you use? Would knee high boots, such as Muck Boots work, or should we plan on having hip waders? From my research and comments made on many other threads, I feel good about using 70 North, just want to be sure we have the right gear for the weather conditions than can be expected that far north. Also, if you feel inclined, PM me the name of the stream you used the pack raft to cross. Thanks for any input. Knute

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knute78 View Post
    Bfish, what time of year was your hunt, and what kind of pack raft did you use? Would knee high boots, such as Muck Boots work, or should we plan on having hip waders? From my research and comments made on many other threads, I feel good about using 70 North, just want to be sure we have the right gear for the weather conditions than can be expected that far north. Also, if you feel inclined, PM me the name of the stream you used the pack raft to cross. Thanks for any input. Knute
    Take hip waders. If all you plan to take is knee high boots, you should just leave them home and wear sneakers. We tried to do it with just Xtra tuffs once...may as well just fill them with water before putting them on in the morning!!!

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    Member babyblue7's Avatar
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    Def hip waders unless you wanna have wet feet all week while out there. There is water every place you step and swamp land pools everywhere that is 6 inches deep on the tundra. Its the kind of place that if it looks dry you walk on it and water sponges out of the ground. Of coarse you could walk on top of the tussocks and risk twisting an ankle like I thought I was gonna do. My boots were frozen stiff every morning.

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    This comment always gets mixed reviews but full chest breathable waders with stocking feet and your choice of properly fitting boots are about the most excellent hunting gear a guy can get into when water crossing or lots of rain/wet vegetation are in your future. Hipboots fit poorly, are heavier than heck, and have poor traction on slippery stream bottoms. Waist waders only gain you a few inches I think they wear poorly.

    I hunt moose in particular with breathable waders, boots with a sticky rubber bottom (which still have excellent traction in mud) and always wear a wading belt (for safety, proper wader wear at the knees, and proper fit for walking). They can be bought for just over 100 bucks and will get you through a season or three if only used for a hunt. My dad bought a set of Cabelas cheapos in 2004 when I first took him on a float trip on the Togiak and he has worn them on 4 trips up here since and they don't appreciably leak and he has hiked, fished, picked berries and just appreciated full body wetness protection in them.

    Biggest thing is getting a set that fit you properly, and then wearing them properly (hiking without a belt makes you feel like a ganster when your crotch starts hanging down). The boots will give you as much support as any mid high hiking boot and you are waterproof to your nipples.

    An added bonus is that when it's pouring rain or the veg is soaking wet, the water that runs down your jacket doesn't pool on your pants right above your hipwaders....I just hate that....and it happens every morning after a good dew.

    Some guys grump about the noise of the fabric when hunting......well, I've shot 5 of my six moose in waders, including one with a bow at 18 yards. I doubt bou will be any more discerning.

    None of my buddies used them unless crossing a stream and two didn't even have any when we first started hunting together. Now all three of them use them as their go to unless it's bright and sunny or it's just a beach hunt from camp.

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    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Well, as it sounds like waders are the go to gear for this hunt, what are every ones recommendations. Stocking foot with wading boots, booted waders, brand/make, neoprene or rubber? I don't own a pair of waders. Muck boots served me very well on my hunt in 2010 on the Middle Fork 40-Mile River. Knute

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    For waders
    These or These from cabelas will do what you need and last several trips if they don't get knifed or ripped up. 140-160 bucks, come in a few sizes including stout if needed.

    For boots

    These will do the trick.

    You can spend much much more for the waders but if these are needed just to allow water crossings and are not needed for 40 plus days of use per year they will get you what you need. Spending a bit more on the boot can pay dividends but I packed out two moose in these boots and lived to tell the tale. I personally wear Simms waders now but I use them a lot for fishing and hunting and the durability is worth it to me.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Knute78 View Post
    Bfish, what time of year was your hunt, and what kind of pack raft did you use? Would knee high boots, such as Muck Boots work, or should we plan on having hip waders? From my research and comments made on many other threads, I feel good about using 70 North, just want to be sure we have the right gear for the weather conditions than can be expected that far north. Also, if you feel inclined, PM me the name of the stream you used the pack raft to cross. Thanks for any input. Knute
    We were there last week of August. We just used a Sevylor vinyl 2 man raft. Worked fine for what we needed. For boots, I'd go with ankle fit boot goretex hip waders or a knee high goretex socks you can wear inside your boots.

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