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Thread: Barnes tsx bt question.

  1. #1

    Default Barnes tsx bt question.

    I'm pretty new to the whole reloading thing and just finished loading up some rounds for my .270 with Barnes 140gr TSX's. After seating the bullet one of the three notches (for lack of a better term) is still visible. My COAL is dead nuts according to the Barnes recommendation and so is my case length. The TSX's are a pretty long bullet and I could increase the seating depth and not create a compressed load but that would reduce my COAL and I don't want to go outside the lines being a noob and all. . Any advice is much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I had the same problem as you, the band was right at the mouth of the neck. Because of it, I would get jams in my rifle. That's a rough spot for some actions! switch to a perfectly good, lead core bullet. This woodleigh protected point 180 grain 270 bullet, is probably shorter than that overly long barnes bullet:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/871...oint-box-of-50

    Should penetrate as deep as a 30-06 180 grain load, or even better than those pesky lil 140 grain deer bullets.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    I had the same problem as you, the band was right at the mouth of the neck. Because of it, I would get jams in my rifle. That's a rough spot for some actions! switch to a perfectly good, lead core bullet. This woodleigh protected point 180 grain 270 bullet, is probably shorter than that overly long barnes bullet:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/871...oint-box-of-50

    Should penetrate as deep as a 30-06 180 grain load, or even better than those pesky lil 140 grain deer bullets.
    Thanks for the advice mainer in ak. I checked, and the Woodleigh bullets in 180gr are actually .391 longer than the Barnes so that ain't going to work. I'm looking for a bit more velocity than the 180gr out of a .270 can provide. I have a 30-06 for big stuff. My .270 with Hornandy SST's has taken 2 elk (1@ 70 yds and 1@200yds) and my wife anchored a bou at 250yds this past fall. So I'm pretty confident in it's ability to get the job done without too much recoil (my wife is a petite gal who doesn't like too much recoil). I couldn't find any SST's when I was bullet shopping and wanted to try the TSX's due to some of the good reviews etc... The 270's seem to feed ok into my tikka and the TSX rounds I made up for my 30-06 seated past the bands so I'm good there. I just wanted some feedback before heading to the range and doing some testing.

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    IMO, the better question is "how did the cartridges chamber and bullets shoot?" I have one rifle (different caliber) where the loaded bullet has a couple of those vents exposed, yet the rifle consistently shoots better than 3/4 MOA. No feeding issues here.

    I wouldn't worry too much about COAL. If getting the vent relative to the end of the case is important to you, would suggest decreasing the COAL to make them "more pretty" then start with less powder ... and then working up to the load that gives you the least velocity deviation and best accuracy for the new COAL. You may have to back off the grains of powder to achieve the desired accuracy anyways.

    In short, there are lots of variables. For example, "Are you shooting the same gun they referenced in the Barnes Manual?" How about the brass used, brass preparation, primers, and powder? Are your chrono results "dead nuts' to those listed in the barnes manual? If your focus is velocity from a 270 cal, options include; trying different powders, lighter bullets, or stepping up to a 270 WBY, or 270 WSM.

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    Two options:

    Back the loads off just a hair or don't load to max and seat them a bit deeper. What them during your work up.

    Option two is shoot them just as they are, shouldn't be any issue.

    When loading TTSX fort .375 I runt them down to the last groove and crimp, which results in a shorter COAL than the book value and I haven't had any trouble, I also don't load for max velocity, I load for best accuracy which is typically low to mid charges.


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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    You can see the same deal as with your handload, hopefully your rifle didn't get caught up like mine did. This only happened when "stealth" cycling my rifle, as that is a major requirement, slow n quite, and racking em home as fast as possible. I switched to the accubond 200 grainers. Still have a pile of the accubonds, and used them as a back-up load this year.

  7. #7

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    The TSX's did not work for me on deer sized game. I would shoot through them and the bullet did not do the damage needed to stop them before they traveled a good ways. I switched to 140 grain interlocks and have been very happy with them.

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    Forgot to mention, that groove is there to reduce contact area with the barrel, thereby allowing the all copper bullet to be loaded like a lead bullet, which will be shorter for the same weight.

    The groove isn't a cannelure, although it can be used as one.


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    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    Forgot to mention, that groove is there to reduce contact area with the barrel

    Did Barnes start with that groove to cut down on the copper fouling problems their product seemed to have.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

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    I am not to sure what the real question was about how the bullet was seated, but in my 30-06 i load 168 tsx and they look just like what you have picture. I ad not had any problems with them at all in load and they shoot get some where around 1/2".

    If you are having a problem with that load then I would try changing it then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boliep View Post
    Did Barnes start with that groove to cut down on the copper fouling problems their product seemed to have.
    They told me the grooves are there to reduce contact friction of each bullet weight to an equivalent contact friction of a lead jacketed bullet of the same weight. Consequently load data for a partition can be used for a TTSX of the same weight, according to Barnes. I followed that advice when loading 250gr TTSX for my .375 and 62gr TTSX for my .223 and had no issues.


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    I load the same except 130s.....seated as yours and they work just fine in both of my 270s.....I don't crimp those loads as the Barnes bullets are seated very firmly in the neck. If yours feeds/functions well and is accurate, what's not to like.

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