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Thread: Ski recommendation

  1. #1
    Member ferns's Avatar
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    Default Ski recommendation

    Hi all,
    i am new to snow sports but a very avid person, unfortunately I now very little about skis. I am looking for a recommendation on what to buy for the following application: I ski snowshoe semi tracked to off trail areas while hunting with my dog for small game. I'd like to cover more ground with less effort and be able to ski some hills as we'll. not sure if I should go with a full on backcountry ski or more of a touring ski? Again I am fairly clueless on this.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferns View Post
    : I ski snowshoe semi tracked to off trail areas while hunting with my dog for small game. I'd like to cover more ground with less effort and be able to ski some hills as we'll. \.
    I like backcountry skis for the use you describe and I ski mostly snow machine trails and unbroken snow through the woods and fields. Look for fairly wide skis with metal edges- the BCN bindings are a little burlier and the boots tend to be more substantial as well. Be sure that your poles are slightly longer than what you'd use for groomed trails. A set of gaiters will help keep snow out of your boots when you bust drifts.

    Some folks use telemark gear but I never got into it as I don't do enough down hill to warrant it.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Go in and talk to the people at AMH. Those folks know their gear in this regards and should be able to line you up with what you want to look for - be it used or new.

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    You will want Xcountry touring gear. The backcountry version has more width and metal edges. You don't need the heavy alpine touring gear. Both SNS and NNN systems have a heavyduty backcountry binding and boot setup. Don't get the lightweight Xcountry touring gear, this is more for groomed trails. Unless you want to ski the trails for fun and exercise, then by all means go light.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Unless you're on a packed trail, you'll likely find that skis are no faster than snowshoes in many condions and when dealing with manuevering around brush and trees skis are much slower than snowshoes. I say this with 4 decades of skiing experience. Skis have their place and advantages, but they don't always offer the speed advantage you might think they would offer, and take a fair bit of skill and practice to give you a benefit.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    I prefer skiis to snowshoes....the only time I use snowshoes is breaking trail, or packing down a runway to takeoff on skiis.

    Skiis glide, snowshoes don't. Put the trail in on snowshoes and use skiis after that. Develope the classical Nordic stride on skiis and cover 3-4 times the distance. If the trail is good enough, use the nordic skating technique and cover the ground even faster. There is no comparison between skiing and snowshoeing for ease of travel. Learning to nordic ski is not that hard.

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    I got turned on to these recently for the exact reasons you stated...I LOVE these things for getting to ice fishing spots, hunting and general "what's over the next hill" outings...check out the videos: https://altaiskis.com/

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    Boy talk about retro-skiis... Whatever works, as they say. The main thing is to get out and do it. I use Nordic skate and classic,(and ski-jor). alpine touring and straight alpine skiis to enjoy the snow. I also use snowshoes when I have to. We have quite a variety of trails up here to explore and just get a workout on.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulflyfish View Post
    I got turned on to these recently for the exact reasons you stated...I LOVE these things for getting to ice fishing spots, hunting and general "what's over the next hill" outings...check out the videos: https://altaiskis.com/
    Did you pick these up locally or have to order through the mail? I'd love to look at some before plunking down the cash.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Hodgeman...They are mail order only as far as I know. If you ever get to Anchorage I would let you try them out. They are the 'crossover' snowmachines of the ski world. Neither true ski nor snowshoe...skishoeing is what the owner of Altai called it. He seems like a real honorable guy. You might give him an email or call if you're interested.

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Just a heads up, Ski AK has a 20% off erverything in the store sale going on. I finally took the plunge and got an AT setup.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Barnys is having a good sale right now.

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Unless you're on a packed trail, you'll likely find that skis are no faster than snowshoes in many condions and when dealing with manuevering around brush and trees skis are much slower than snowshoes. I say this with 4 decades of skiing experience. Skis have their place and advantages, but they don't always offer the speed advantage you might think they would offer, and take a fair bit of skill and practice to give you a benefit.
    I don't know what kind of skis you're on... but I would beg to differ. In my experience; Skis are very rarely slower than snowshoes, and more often are much faster/more efficient. They are by far the better tool for breaking trail in deep snow. Ask any backcountry snowboarder without a splitboard...


    Quote Originally Posted by ferns View Post
    Hi all,
    i am new to snow sports but a very avid person, unfortunately I now very little about skis. I am looking for a recommendation on what to buy for the following application: I ski snowshoe semi tracked to off trail areas while hunting with my dog for small game. I'd like to cover more ground with less effort and be able to ski some hills as we'll. not sure if I should go with a full on backcountry ski or more of a touring ski? Again I am fairly clueless on this.
    ferns- Look into the newer "hybrid" types of backcountry skis. I'm talking skis with the size and shape of full on backcountry skis, but with scaled bases like x-country.
    Skis like the Voile Vector BC, The Voile Charger BC, the Rossignol BC125s..

    This will provide you the ultimate in versatility.
    My opinion- Get you some Voile Vector BCs in whatever length you like, pair them up with some old school silvrettas.
    Then you can use pretty much any crampon compatible boot (stiff hunting boots work great for just traveling) OR ski boots in that binding. You have all the advantages of scales, all the advantages of new ski geometry, and you can still slap some skins on there if you need to climb some steep stuff.
    These skis can skate, can climb, and they are pretty dang fun going down too!!

  14. #14
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    I'm with you icb12 except for using the scaled bases, our cold snow does better with kick wax or short skins. Too much drag on the dry snow with the fish scale kick zone. Works better on the wet type snow.

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