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Thread: What's a 89 Bravo worth?

  1. #1

    Default What's a 89 Bravo worth?

    Hey Folks,

    I'm going to take a look at a 89 Yahama bravo long track tomorrow. If I buy it, it will be my 1st snowmachine, and will be largely used on my trapline and with the kids. I'm not sure how many miles it has, but it is supposedly reliable, though it's missing a windshield and has some minor cosmetic damage. I have absolutely no idea what a fair price for a used sled like this might be. Any thoughts? Any tips/advice would be most welcome.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    People think they are worth gold since they quit making them a few years ago.
    $500- seems like a reasonable price if it runs and is in decent shape.
    They are really simple machines with almost zero creature comforts. They are popular like the older tundras for trapping and kids, just as you mentioned.
    BK

    Have you looked on Craigs or Aklist at all??

  3. #3

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    BKmail,

    Thanks for the input. I've been trolling Craigslist and Alaskaslist quite a bit, and while a few of these come up from time to time, I have no way of knowing what they are actually sold for. The guy is saying $950 is as low as he'd go...not sure if that's a total rip-off or not...It seems to me that prices are pretty inflated up here...but again, I have no idea.

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    I'd agree with bkmail, I don't think I'd pay much over $500 for it. That's a simple machine that is almost 25 years old.

  5. #5
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    You could also take a look here and have somewhat of an idea of how much:
    http://www.kbb.com/snowmobile/
    http://www.nadaguides.com/motorcycles/snowmobiles

  7. #7

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    Not sure on the Bravo, but lots of older motorized toys no longer have parts available... check the availability of parts or you will only be buying a "parts" machine and then buying something newer to ride. Might be an expensive and frustrating lesson.
    Good luck.

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you do get an older sled beware that you'll likely have to do some deferred maintenance. My first sled was 94 skandic, $400 seemed great for a machine that seemed to work fine and just needed a windshield and the seat recovered. Of course my enthusiasm was a bit dampened when I found out I needed to replace all the bearings in the idler wheels, a few of the wheels, a broken shock, jackshaft bearings, hyfax, carb boots, a set of gears and the back half cover of the chaincase, skis, windshield and I'm sure a few things I'm forgetting. $1200 on top of the purchase price and a bunch of labor later it runs pretty good. Still need a speedo cable and new front bumper. I did swap out the original track for a used paddle track.

    Pretty tough to find an older machine for less than $1000 that doesn't need some work, and often times more than a little bit of work. It's also hard to know what to look for unless you've gone through the learning curve of rebuilding an older machine. Not only is it the cost of replacement parts, but you'll probably become an expert on searching the net for places that have old stock parts, salvage yards and ebay.

    If you can find one of the rare powder puff wife/girlfriend machines that has 200 miles on it and has spent 20 years in the garage they are worth the typical $2k asking price.

    If you can find a bravo or tundra that is in truly good shape they're worth $1500 or more. Trapline machines need to be dead reliable.

    Good luck finding a machine that costs less than $1500 either when you purchase it, or eventually. A truly cherry machine is worth the higher initial price vs. spending all winter tracking down spare parts and rebuilding a "bargain" sled.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elac12585 View Post
    You could also take a look here and have somewhat of an idea of how much:http://www.kbb.com/snowmobile/http://www.nadaguides.com/motorcycles/snowmobiles
    Prices in Alaska are much higher than guide prices, unless the machine is ready for the scrap heap.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10

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    I picked up a 1994 Cheetah 340 about two weeks ago. Seems to be a first pull starter. Lightweight. The track isn't very awesome on it. It has really shallow tread, which is what I don't like about it. It needed a couple things; windshield, carb adjustment (barely idled before I adjusted the airscrew), hand warmers, new throttle lever. $450 for the sled, and $200 in random parts. I could probably get twice that for it if I wanted to sell it. It is what it is, an old cheap small sled. Don't think that a machine has to say "Tundra" or "Bravo" on it for it to meet your needs.

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