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Thread: yukon river....is it worth it?

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    Member winibezold's Avatar
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    Default yukon river....is it worth it?

    ok, I'm not fishing for a spot to go, but trying to plan my own adventure. the idea is to hit the Yukon in my jet boat and try to bring a moose home. the boat is ok, I'm ok and I'm ready for the work. The question I have is this.... I see that a large portion of the Yukon river is native owned by doyon. their website says that they do not issue hunting permits i.e. passes for their lands to outsiders. I didn't enter for any drawings on the river, so I would be looking to shoot up the river and just try to find a good spot to shore up for a week. Also, I'm very white and I've heard plenty of horror stories about the poor hospitality to outsiders in that part of the bush. not saying they are bad people, just heard it by word of mouth. So anyway, is there enough open land along the river that I don't have to worry about trespassing or getting shot at for being somewhere that I'm not? I wouldn't plan on taking tons of extra fuel, so it would probably be 100 or so miles from the bridge on the Dalton highway upstream.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winibezold View Post
    So anyway, is there enough open land along the river that I don't have to worry about trespassing or getting shot at for being somewhere that I'm not?
    The Yukon river is a BIG place...... so yes.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Just be respectful and you won't have a problem. Be sure to get a map and stay off private ground (below high water mark) or just hunt elsewhere. Like 4mer said, it' a big river. You may have more trouble with other hunters than you will the locals. Last time I was up, when I owned a jet boat, a group of hunters shot a bull right next to the tent of another group of hunters and I think one hunter was still in the tent. We saw a few boats stacked on the bank and a big commotion and thought it better to keep going. I found out what happened from the park ranger who stopped to make sure we knew about the high water mark rule.

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    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Just get a map, do your homework and have fun. But, for me - Koyukuk. But it's a haul.
    Tony

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    Member winibezold's Avatar
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    yeah i've seen enough here about the koyukuk to want to go there, but i can't swing that kind of time off. i'm aware that its a pretty big area and a big river, i was just alerted to the doyon map and it seems their land holdings cover most of the river and a good number of its larger tributaries. i'll continue the research. is it safer or moosier upstream or downstream from the dalton bridge?

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    Never been upstream. Looks braided up, but that might be good hunting and good territory for a jet boat.

    Downstream, there are places that have moose I suppose. As you get close to the Nowitna, the opportunities increase. 100 miles from the bridge is not really very far in terms of travel on the Yukon.

    What type of boat do you have? What are your goals: Solitary hunting, trophies, abundance of game, adventure? How far are you willing to hike off the river to get your moose? How many people will you be going with? It is a long haul but worth it if you have the right mind set, gear and time to enjoy it. And it aint cheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winibezold View Post
    ok, I'm not fishing for a spot to go, but trying to plan my own adventure. the idea is to hit the Yukon in my jet boat and try to bring a moose home. the boat is ok, I'm ok and I'm ready for the work. The question I have is this.... I see that a large portion of the Yukon river is native owned by doyon. their website says that they do not issue hunting permits i.e. passes for their lands to outsiders. I didn't enter for any drawings on the river, so I would be looking to shoot up the river and just try to find a good spot to shore up for a week. Also, I'm very white and I've heard plenty of horror stories about the poor hospitality to outsiders in that part of the bush. not saying they are bad people, just heard it by word of mouth. So anyway, is there enough open land along the river that I don't have to worry about trespassing or getting shot at for being somewhere that I'm not? I wouldn't plan on taking tons of extra fuel, so it would probably be 100 or so miles from the bridge on the Dalton highway upstream.
    No word of mouth: reality. But most do everything they can to play it down, as "we are all Americans" and all that ridiculousness.

    Most villages on the Yukon you won't want to stop and leave your boat. Always have someone stay with the boat so it won't be stripped by the time you come back. It will be fine if you stop in a village to get some goodies, but don't plan on camping. Just keep going until you are ten or so miles past the village. You'll be good camping within the tide mark. Also look for sloughs you can slip up to stay off the main river when you camp. Safest way actually.

    This isn't limited to the Yukon. It's the same here on the Kuskokwim. Up past Tuluksak the people become hostile; in 1996 when my BIL (Yup'ik) and I went up, he told me not to wave at anyone because it would attract attention. And it isn't limited to Native against non-Native, it is Athabascan Indians against the Yup'ik. There is the hostility of the Tundra Yup'ik towards the River Yup'ik and Coastal Yup'ik against everyone. Up until 100 years ago there was war and slaving up and down the river. Just the way it was and is today. Read some of the books by Kilbuk.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    No word of mouth: reality. But most do everything they can to play it down, as "we are all Americans" and all that ridiculousness.

    Most villages on the Yukon you won't want to stop and leave your boat. Always have someone stay with the boat so it won't be stripped by the time you come back. It will be fine if you stop in a village to get some goodies, but don't plan on camping. Just keep going until you are ten or so miles past the village. You'll be good camping within the tide mark. Also look for sloughs you can slip up to stay off the main river when you camp. Safest way actually.

    This isn't limited to the Yukon. It's the same here on the Kuskokwim. Up past Tuluksak the people become hostile; in 1996 when my BIL (Yup'ik) and I went up, he told me not to wave at anyone because it would attract attention. And it isn't limited to Native against non-Native, it is Athabascan Indians against the Yup'ik. There is the hostility of the Tundra Yup'ik towards the River Yup'ik and Coastal Yup'ik against everyone. Up until 100 years ago there was war and slaving up and down the river. Just the way it was and is today. Read some of the books by Kilbuk.
    This is in line with what my family has experienced on the Yukon.

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    nice video. looks like a good time you guys are lucky indeed

    Sean

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    Member winibezold's Avatar
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    as much as I want to be able to drop one on the river bank, I would be willing to walk up to a couple miles away from the boat to be successful. I used 100 or so miles because I'm not positive how my economy will be with my new impellers in the jet. its a solid 22ft inboard with a 350 and a 3 stage jet. I really don't need a giant moose, but would like it to be legal and over 50", but its any bull up in most of those areas anyway, right? I will have at least 1 partner maybe 2, so that also limits the amount of extra fuel I can take due to gear weight. I suppose I could stash fuel on the way out, but if the locals are that hostile toward hand waving, then I can be pretty sure they'll be happy to lighten my fuel load on the shore. It's between the Yukon and the yentna, but then I've heard a lot of that area is privately owned. Its a toss up

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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    Fricken Awesome!!! Me and a buddy are doin the same thing next season. I hope we have the same luck you did. Helluva job on the video bro...

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    Quote Originally Posted by winibezold View Post
    as much as I want to be able to drop one on the river bank, I would be willing to walk up to a couple miles away from the boat to be successful. I used 100 or so miles because I'm not positive how my economy will be with my new impellers in the jet. its a solid 22ft inboard with a 350 and a 3 stage jet. I really don't need a giant moose, but would like it to be legal and over 50", but its any bull up in most of those areas anyway, right? I will have at least 1 partner maybe 2, so that also limits the amount of extra fuel I can take due to gear weight. I suppose I could stash fuel on the way out, but if the locals are that hostile toward hand waving, then I can be pretty sure they'll be happy to lighten my fuel load on the shore. It's between the Yukon and the yentna, but then I've heard a lot of that area is privately owned. Its a toss up
    I know several people who stash gas drums for exactly that purpose. They'll drag them back a hundred yards or so into the trees so they cannot be seen. Remember your GPS!
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    I know several people who stash gas drums for exactly that purpose. They'll drag them back a hundred yards or so into the trees so they cannot be seen. Remember your GPS!
    I would recommend marking anything left with TWO gps devices, don't ask my why Also make sure to not leave evidence, like foot prints on shore or use the mouth a creek or other major land mark. Cover the cans with brush so they can't be seen easy.
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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blood_Vessel View Post
    LOVE the headliner on your truck - awesome idea!!! And a Boilermaker fan to boot.

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    +1for koyukuk

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    Trick I learned years ago about hiding fuel. Those coffee roasting places that have sprouted up all over, have big burlap coffee bean bags. The big ones fit over the 15gal poly drum. Put them inside, tie the top and lay them over. You better have a good mark or waypoint if you want to find them again.

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    Member Bob the fisher's Avatar
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    Holy crap, looks like I will be bringing the wagon as well...
    "Fisherman for Life" and "Phantom owner Forever"

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    Those black pull behind plastic sleds are a wonderful tool for getting fuel can to and from shore as well as getting moose quarters back to the boat.

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/KL-Industr...ype=15&veh=aff
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    Going upstream, the only "issues" that I've heard from good decent people that I know who've gone through them parts, is around Beaver and Purgatory. Not certain how far you're really going, but those 2 places aren't very friendly if you don't live there, if ya know what I mean. Like you, that was via, word of mouth.

    Depending on how the draw results are next month, if I'm not drawn for moose, then I'm looking at doing something very similar "up there".
    Good luck...

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