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Thread: Lure Retention & Loss

  1. #1

    Default Lure Retention & Loss

    Studies have shown:

    Better not let the newbie use that $45 stainless steel clacker jig.............

    and the seasoned salt could fish all summer on a homemade copper tube or scrap metal jig.
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  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by titobandito View Post
    Studies have shown:

    Better not let the newbie use that $45 stainless steel clacker jig.............

    and the seasoned salt could fish all summer on a homemade copper tube or scrap metal jig.
    Holy cow. Someone who analyzes their fishing more than I do! That's hilarious, but seems to correspond with reality. Definitely laughing but I don't want to take away from the scientific study of course.

    Also obviously someone who uses lures more expensive than I think I have ever seen except for the big sailfish and tuna lures!!! What exactly are these $50 lures...heck the $22 Lures...

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Fortunately I don't have any really expensive jigs, so when the rocks claim a jig it's $5-10 a wack. That and I like trying out new jigs every once in awhile so need to loose a few now and again as an excuse to buy some more

    I did learn this season that if you have an inexperienced fisherman on board you shouldn't be nice and hand him the $120 rod when he wouldn't know the difference between it and the $30 rod. But you will know the difference when he turns the 2pc rod into a 4pc rod. On the upside, Shimano warranties their more expensive rods so I just had to pay the shipping for the replacement rod. I was most impressed by his skills when I went to the shop I bought the rod to get a replacement and they said they have guides that have used these rods all summer and mine was the only rod they'd seen broken.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    I'd like to see a similar analysis based on the number of fish caught on the lure compared to the retention/loss. I'm guessing the ones that never catch fish never get lost.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The ones that catch rocks are the ones that get lost. I've only lost two jigs to fish due to lines breaking, I don't keep track of how many the rocks have claimed. Since I typically have 3-4 people fishing at a time I get a chance to try different lures to see what is working best.

    Slow days are often the most interesting because you'll start trying things you typically wouldn't use because the old standby's aren't producing. For instance this past fall my mooching rigs just weren't landing coho so I decided to dry jigging which was much more effective and then I decided to try trolling a coyote spoon and used a 10 oz banana sinker to get it down as I don't have downriggers. That silver and green coyote acounted for the largest coho's. We also tossed the occasional buzz bomb which also worked really well.

    If I really wanted to be scientific I'd log each day fished with weather, water temp, tide, current, structure fished, the lures used, and what lures landed what fish and at what depth the fish were hooked. That said I don't know that I'd put enough days on the water each season to get a statistically significant set of data to form any valid conclusions.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Paul I've had the opposite in the juneau area, I've lost nearly no jigs to rocks, but I lost so many to bite offs (arrowtooth I assume but perhaps dogfish) that I started pouring my own jigs last year....

    But, last year when my dad started dragging an 8 oz jig across the bottom like he was fishing walleyes I had to breathe deep before RE-educating him that vertical jigging is supposed to be "vertical"....

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I lost count but hooked over 1/2 dozen arrow tooth out of Seward on one trip this summer and didn't loose a single jig to the toothy buggers. They did leave the assist hook line somewhat ragged though. I run a topshot of about 6' of 80# mono with my braided line and find that the mono is more abrasion resistant than braid.

    If I'm drifting shallower to deeper than I rarely loose jigs to the rocks but if the tide or wind is running us from deep to shallow then it only takes a moments inatention to bury a jig in the rocks, especially with less experienced folks though I'll certainly loose a jig or two myself. Considering how much fishing I did this year we lost very few jigs.

    Speaking of pouring jigs I loaned a buddy my 16 and 24 oz jig molds, need to see if he every got around to casting up some jigs so I can get the molds back.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    I'll have to try the topshot......before I started pouring that got expensive quick.....how do you connect the braid to the topshot?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Yeah that is just another reason not to buy any of those $40 Butt cracker jigs.
    http://www.fishcrackerbaits.com

    From my standpoint it is difficult. On one hand I hate to see anybody loose tackle or gear left on the ocean floor forever. That being said since I will be selling jigs this year if people never loose any then sales will eventually grow stagnant.
    I do make some jigs in the $18 range. But they are very large at 24+ oz and they come from custom CNC machined molds that are very expensive and they take a lot of powder paint to get them covered plus the other accessories that go on them.
    I usually lose a couple each year to stupidity and a couple to the bottom. I don't fish the rocks a lot so that helps. But if I start finding new fishing spots in the rockpiles or start seriously targeting lings and rockfish I can see the gear loss increasing.
    Fortunately I have more jigs than I can ever hope to fish as I make them myself.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    I'll have to try the topshot......before I started pouring that got expensive quick.....how do you connect the braid to the topshot?
    Surgeon knot with the lines passed through the bite 4 times, it's not shown passed 4 times in the illustration.



    One of my son's science projects was testing various knots connecting dacron to braid and braid to mono for breaking strength. Yes, ulterior motive on my part. What we found is that not only do different knots break at different points, but that some knots are consistantly strong, and others may be strong one time and week the next, depending on how well you tied it. So have a knot that is easy to tie on a rocking boat to me is just as important as high breaking strength and hence I found that the surgeon knot has worked best for me.

    If fishing is hot and heavy I'll forgo to the top shot and just put a knew corkscrew swivel on with a palomar knot.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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