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Thread: Lake trolling for trout

  1. #1
    Member Anythingalaska's Avatar
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    Default Lake trolling for trout

    Anyone else try trolling for trout in the summer time? On some of our larger lakes down here in SE, it can be productive, usually catching larger fish than spin casting I've heard, though I haven't actually tried it myself. Maybe this summer I'll give it a shot!

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    Yes, trolled a lot when I lived on Lake Clark. Home of fifty plus pound Lake Trout.

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    Get a set of cowbells, then tie a lure or fly on after that,with or without bait. Troll slow over weed beds if the lake has them. Fish on!
    The secret to fishing is: Fish where the fish are.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    For Rainbows I like to troll a small #1 or a #0 Mepps in red or orange. Sometimes silver and other colors work as well. I also like trolling the same size
    Vibrax spinners.
    I use a trolling motor on my driftboat and that works well for our local lakes.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  5. #5

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    Over 50 years ago we did a whole lot of lake trolling for rainbows and browns. Knocked them silly slow trolling with oars and no outboard. No weights or anything, just kinda lazing along a foot or so under the surface.

    I get nostalgic for that now and then, so I go back to the same rigs slow trolled with oars. Still knocks them silly. Top producer for some reason has always been the F7 size Flatfish in the frog pattern. Second best is a black Woolly Bugger fly about 6" behind a gold Colorado spinner. We're talking old school here, but it's hard to argue with success.

    BTW- When deep trolling behind cowbells, that F7 frog Flatfish still outproduced about anything else.

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    Use to do alot in canada ,use to really slay them you never know what your gonna pull up could be a 5 pounder might be a 30 pounder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    . Top producer for some reason has always been the F7 size Flatfish in the frog pattern. Second best is a black Woolly Bugger fly about 6" behind a gold Colorado spinner. We're talking old school here, but it's hard to argue with success.

    BTW- When deep trolling behind cowbells, that F7 frog Flatfish still outproduced about anything else.
    Definately old skewl, but you are right, its hard to argue with success.

    The flatfish you mention works good here too. There are a couple others that seem to do very well also, one that comes to mind is one with a rainbowish pattern with a red stripe. Said to immitate an injured baitfish.

    Slow troll for lakers is still rather popular here. Metal is something to consider as well. Mooselooks in orange with black spots, and silver with blue always seem to do well. Large streamers like gray ghost and Joe's Smelt also seem to be top producers. IIRC folks out that way call smelt Hooligans. So, maybe a Hooligan pattern of some kind.

    I would imagine, but cannot confirm that the techniques I use here in the cold deep water lakes would also be effective there. I haven't ever fished for lakers when in Alaska, usually 'bows, grays, and dollys. Thats probably a function of where I go though. Hopefully some local laker fisherman can confirm or debunk my suggestions for AK waters.

  8. #8

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    My two "go to" lake trolling set ups are a minnow type lure like the rapala or the yo-zuri pin minnows. The other is a walleye style lindy rig with a night crawler. The minnow lures seem to catch bigger fish than the nightcrawlers but the night crawlers catch more.

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    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    My two "go to" lake trolling set ups are a minnow type lure like the rapala or the yo-zuri pin minnows. The other is a walleye style lindy rig with a night crawler. The minnow lures seem to catch bigger fish than the nightcrawlers but the night crawlers catch more.
    Do you use a stinger on the lindy rig?

  10. #10

    Default Lake trolling for trout

    Quote Originally Posted by NeverLand View Post
    Do you use a stinger on the lindy rig?
    The night crawlers I use are the typical long ones so yeah, I snell two hooks. Then place one in the head and let the second trail slightly behind freely....as i do my herring for salmon. I try not to thread the back hook because I think it impedes the action. But my buddies snell the hooks with the hooks spread slightly shorter than the worm and they catch fish. Pinning the head and the very back of the worm I think impedes the action.


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    Member NeverLand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    The night crawlers I use are the typical long ones so yeah, I snell two hooks. Then place one in the head and let the second trail slightly behind freely....as i do my herring for salmon. I try not to thread the back hook because I think it impedes the action. But my buddies snell the hooks with the hooks spread slightly shorter than the worm and they catch fish. Pinning the head and the very back of the worm I think impedes the action.


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    When I fished walleye in Quebec I used the Lindy rig with a stinger. I caught more fish than without, but they averaged smaller. I found that the smaller fish tended to hit the trailing hook.

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    I'm pretty sure live bait is not allowed state wide in freshwater, so crawlers are illegal.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    I'm pretty sure live bait is not allowed state wide in freshwater, so crawlers are illegal.
    That's incorrect. The regs say that "live fish may not be used for bait in fresh water".

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    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    Look up the definition of "live fish". From my memory, it includes insects and worms.


    Get down, get deep, get snagged, fish on!
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    Look up the definition of "live fish". From my memory, it includes insects and worms.


    Get down, get deep, get snagged, fish on!
    Haha...DannerAK is.....CORRECT...at least for what he stated above!!!!! Ok I'm on a roll in trying to get info so of course, I had to call on this one. You would be surprised at the answer I got. I was told by the person answering the phone, that they had this EXACT conversation last week. They consulted a retired wildlife trooper and a legal analyst and it is going to depend on the trooper enforcing it. The definition clearly states fish are: fish means any species of aquatic finfish, invertebrate, or amphibian, in any stage of its life cycle, found in or introduced into the state, and includes any part of such aquatic finfish, invertebrate, or amphibian.

    BUT their conclusion was that they believed this law to be in place because they do not want transfer of invasive species into other environments. So if its something that isn't "Aquatic" was the term he used, it was PROBABLY legal. So it means earthworms, maggots, mealworms are ok. Leeches, dragon fly nymphs, etc are NOT legal. Maybe its a grammar error but they focused on the word "aquatic" though it looks like it applies only to the "finfish in the above definition. They applied it to the invertebrate and amphibians....

    Not the most comforting response I have ever gotten especially when you call fish and game directly. So take your chances... I'm not sure I want to even deal with that issue. I gotta believe that 99% Trooper will not ticket you . 99.9 percent a court will not convict...but the odd that remains is still scary enough to me as much as I LOVE fishing!!!

    Learn something new everyday...

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    Member Tearbear's Avatar
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    To be on the safe side...maybe? Make sure the worms are dead before you stick 'em on your hook.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    worms an night crawers are in my front lawn an just about all the lots in my sub division I have picked up many over my years , as well as used them
    F&G cops have never said a thing to me, in 1967 when I crossed the boarder into Alaska I sold about 1 large coffie can full to
    one F & G person in Toke AK, I know about the live fish but there could be a change in the regs. would not supprize me , but I use them even ice fishing work [ great ] I keep a stash in the garage of my use [ I still use them ] [ heated ] SID

  18. #18

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    Fishing Crawlers brings me back to my youth fishing in the great state of Minnetucky! Panfish, Walleyes, Bass, Crappies, even Steelies! Fished them for everything!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Give me a break, earth worms are about as aquatic as the honey badger. Yeah they can go in the water, and even survive for a long time in the water. But it is a stretch to call them aquatic. Earth worms eat dirt and that is pretty hard to do in the water. Honestly, if you get a ticket for using them where bait is legal it should be grounds for termination it is really stretching the intent of the law. And, even the definition of the law for that matter.....It has probably happened.....I fish with them where legal in all the local lakes on a wedding ring spinner. Trout just can't seem to resist that combo.

  20. #20
    Member Zissou's Avatar
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    I've always understood that aquatic things like leeches and fish were not legal, but mealworms, waxworms and crawlers were, hence their ease of availability.

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