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Thread: Other families?

  1. #1
    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Default Other families?

    Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Aaron and I have a small family and want to find a few other families that want to go in on a idea. If I am not mistaken remote land has no restrictions? That it could be shared by more than one family?

    I am interested in a remote piece of land with in an hour flight north of Anchorage, I am a pilot. I would like to have between 2 and 9 acres. I am hoping to be able to build a lodge with several cabins. Having a few greenhouses and maybe even small livestock, a portable sawmill and a few sheds would be nice. I have been studying about Alaska and have narrowed it down to where and I am interested in planning out and making the move by 2016 (giving everyone involved plenty of time to plan ahead)

    A little more about my family and I. I am self employed and will be able to commute when need be to run my business. I was raised on a small farm and know how much of a farm I can have up there. My family is growing so they are not going to be little kids that need lots of attention and may decide to move out when college calls. I like the idea of a few other families for safety concerns, plus the size of the farm would need more than my family to run it.

    The biggest idea I have here is to be off the grid and be able to provide as much as possible to the community. Of course I am not kidding myself to think we can have every thing we need there. I can fly us in as often as needed to Anchorage for any supplies, getting back to civilization or just a break from the farm. However I do think it would be nice for each family to have their own cabin and life on the farm so they can have their own privacy. The lodge would be more or less for the families to be able to socialize or mingle when they feel like it.

    Those who come across this post whether interested in tid-bits of info to share or actually thinking of joining feel free to chime in.


    Looking forward to hearing your feed back

    Aaron

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    What part of the state are you looking at?
    Do you really think your remote area can support a farm of any size?
    While I also grew up on a farm that was in the Midwest in farm country. I know it would be much much harder in Alaska even on the road system.
    Another question for you is have you actually visited Alaska? If so have you visited the parcel of land you plan to buy?
    If not then I would highly suggest you visit the property before committing to this venture.
    I wish you good luck and keep us updated even if your plans fail.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Member Anythingalaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    What part of the state are you looking at?
    Do you really think your remote area can support a farm of any size?
    While I also grew up on a farm that was in the Midwest in farm country. I know it would be much much harder in Alaska even on the road system.
    Another question for you is have you actually visited Alaska? If so have you visited the parcel of land you plan to buy?
    If not then I would highly suggest you visit the property before committing to this venture.
    I wish you good luck and keep us updated even if your plans fail.
    That about sums it up. To be completely self reliant in the wilderness is a hard thing to do, especially in Alaska. Winters are brutal. The maintenance of this farm, or 'community' really; is going to take a lot of work! Having to make airplane food trips in bad weather in the dead of winter will not be fun, not to mention a medical emergency... not trying to convince you not to do it, just things to think about!

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    I am interested in up the Yentna or Susitna rivers. I have been studying the areas. I have been thinking about the negatives of course. The idea is safety in numbers. The biggest thing is finding other families that see the music on the same sheet.

    Details on the actual set up of the farm are reserved for those who want to partake. Financial details and the split of this community will be discussed with those who are ready to pony up. 2016 should be plenty of time to pick out a parcel of land and give it a gander.

    Is this a pipe dream? I think not, it has been done this way for generations. Yes, it is old fashioned, but I see things like this coming back around. Bartering is now more acceptable or coming back as way to do business especially among friends or family members.

    I look at as I have a few skills I can trade with others with in a close-knit community on a decent size parcel of land that could be a little remote.
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    You may want to talk to some people in that region about the quality of the soil. My brother has a cabin on the Yentna. While he's not a farmer or even an experienced gardner, he's played with potatoes the past two years with very minimal results. It's pretty solidly clay where he's at, and he's at the point that he'll need to bring in soil to get a decent garden. We're talking a very small recreational garden, though - not they type that will feed multiple families. That said, I hear the owner of Yentna Station (or maybe it is Luce's?) has a phenomenal garden. Not saying it can't be done - but talking to folks that do so in the area would be wise.
    Last edited by Brian M; 01-08-2014 at 21:51. Reason: spelling

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You may want to talk to some people in that region about the quality of the soil. My brother has a cabin on the Yentna. While he's not a farmer or even an experienced gardner, he's played with potatoes the past two years with very minimal results. It's pretty solidly clay where he's at, and he's at the point that he'll need to bring in soil to get a decent garden. We're talking a very small recreational garden, though - not they type that will feed multiple families. That said, I hear the owner of Yentna Station (or maybe it is Luce's?) has a phenomenal garden. Not saying it can't be done - but talking to folks that do so in the area would be wise.
    I hear you Brian. It's all about preparing the soil correctly. Luckily I have that covered (or should I say I know what to do).
    Last edited by Brian M; 01-08-2014 at 21:50. Reason: spelling in my post
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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Have you ever been to Alaska?
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    Have you ever been to Alaska?
    Not yet. Looking forward to visiting in March and again in August.
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cressaar View Post
    Not yet. Looking forward to visiting in March and again in August.
    you really need to visit in January/February to see what you are really getting into.

  10. #10
    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    you really need to visit in January/February to see what you are really getting into.
    Yep. That will be in 2015. Again planning ahead. Hhmm, so no one is interested in joining in?
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cressaar View Post
    Yep. That will be in 2015. Again planning ahead. Hhmm, so no one is interested in joining in?

    No offense intended, but many of us have seen this before, which likely explains the lack of willing, um.....volunteers.....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    No offense intended, but many of us have seen this before, which likely explains the lack of willing, um.....volunteers.....
    No offense taken. However I do not see this as volunteering, but more of being part of it and taking ownership. All families will have a say in the decision making process
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

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    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    Aaron, what part of Oregon are you from? I am a Klamath boy myself. I have to ask what is the draw of sharing your space? The more my family grows the more I want to move away from everyone else!

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Lots of big family compounds up in talkeetna area. Plenty remote but road access to get supplies and equipment in and likely better soil. Buying on the edge of the grid will be much more affordable than trying to go off of it. If you have a plane then you will have massive areas of wilderness to explore within just a few minutes flight and you would very rarely have outside intrusions when on your land.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Could this be a source of another Alaska reality show?
    I hope not but it almost sounds that way.
    You know several families new to Alaska confident they can start farming where nobody ever has and make a go of it.
    Families who barely know each other but are confident they can make their own commune work.

    I believe there is a group like this on the Peninsula or at least there was. A friend of my dads was an Paramedic and firefighter before he injured his back. For several years he taught first aid,CPR and similar classes. This group would always hire him for a few classes every year to help them be more self sufficient.
    So I suppose something along these lines can be done in the right situations. Still not sure on the farming aspect though but a few animals and a garden for one family is certainly doable. I am just not sure on how big that can grow to and still remain viable.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Lots of big family compounds up in talkeetna area. Plenty remote but road access to get supplies and equipment in and likely better soil. Buying on the edge of the grid will be much more affordable than trying to go off of it. If you have a plane then you will have massive areas of wilderness to explore within just a few minutes flight and you would very rarely have outside intrusions when on your land.
    Thanks Lujon. I figured my idea was not all that bad. I posted on 'Relocating to Alaska' looking for others who want to join in and RELOCATE, lol.
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

  17. #17

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    Something to keep in mind when looking for land is how you would handle transportation if/when necessary when you can't use your plane. While a plane is great for summer and winter travel, there are the shoulder seasons when you can't land or take off from water. When thawed, floats are good, when frozen, skis usually work, but when in the process of freezing or thawing, you need an alternative and those are also usually the times when ATV travel is very difficult if not impossible due to soft train conditions if you even have trail to get between where you are and where you want to get and boats can't navigate the ice on the rivers. Having space and the proper layout of land for a gravel strip would probably help avoid issues with access during the shoulder seasons.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cressaar View Post
    I hear you Brian. It's all about preparing the soil correctly. Luckily I have that covered (or should I say I know what to do).
    Cressaar
    your partially correct, However, you want to take a real close look at any property you choose to make sure you have soil and not just 9 acres of muskeg.. As Brian pointed out, the soil isn't ideal everywhere. I Grant you, you can always work to improve any soil, but then it becomes a question of how much effort (and expense) are you going to put into extremely poor soil to make it produce for you?
    Farming and gardening in Alaska is much different than anywhere in the L48. But it's not all doom and gloom, because I have seen some beautiful gardens at a few places up and down the Yentna River.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Good for you for having the ambition and fortitude to pull this off. I hope you'll continue to post/update your observations after you visit this spring/summer.

    I'm sure you can get wireless internet, etc..., but it sounds like you may have a job that allows you to be away for some time?

    Also, how come you don't move to Skwenta or another existing community? Too big?

    Tim

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    Member cressaar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    Cressaar
    Farming and gardening in Alaska is much different than anywhere in the L48. But it's not all doom and gloom, because I have seen some beautiful gardens at a few places up and down the Yentna River.
    Nobody wants doom and gloom. Remember it is a labor of love in order to make it worth the while
    Life is to short, live life to the fullest

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