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Thread: 5.56/223 rifiling and bullet GR

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    Default 5.56/223 rifiling and bullet GR

    Hello All,

    Question about .223s & 5.56mms and their rifling for different bullet 'weights'.
    I shoot a rem700 ADL with a factory 1:12" in .223 using either 45 or 55 gr FMJs, HPs, and accutips.
    I did shoot some American Eagle 5.56s in 55gr and had good performance (other than ejection.)
    I was wondering if I can stabilize the 62 gr bullets with the 1:12"?
    Anyone with experience please pitch in.
    I've read everywhere else on the web, but I want closer and (hopefully) more reliable sources.

    thanks!
    Nanuaq2013

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    Not likely, the prefered rate of twist for 62 grains and up is 1:8 or faster, as I understand it, and is what my barrel is turning. I do not, however, have any experience shooting a 62 or heavier in a slow twist like 1:12. I am sure someone has had good results someplace, but I expect that is much more the "exception" rather than the "rule".

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    I have a Rem700V in 223 with 1/12 twist. I have only tried one 62gr and it didn't shoot well.

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    "1-in-12 Inches
    This is the slowest twist still seen in large numbers on AR-15s and other .223s. Though far better than the 1-in-14 twist, it is still unsuited for some of the premium loads developed over the past decade. Conventional wisdom suggests this twist rate is perfect for bullets in the 55-to 60-grain range, though most will stabilize the common 62-grain FMJ rounds. If you hunt prairie dogs or coyotes with lightweight .223 bullets, this twist rate will do fine for your needs. Doubletapís 55-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip load generates 3,300 feet per second of velocity out of a 22-inch barrel, and will easily stabilize in this twist rate."
    Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/2013/12/2...#ixzz2pktCFiDE

    I found this gem and was wondering if they shoot at the least 1moa at 100 yards?


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    Concerning .224 diameter barrels, 1:12 is a slow twist for the heavier (actually think longer rather than weight) bullets, though I've seen them handle various 60 grain bullets very accurately. 1:9 is plenty of twist for the Barnes 62 grain TSX as well as the 75 grain Hornady BTHP when fired at .223 velocities and those bullets are longer than other 62 grain offerings. I've seen barrels marked as 1:9 stabilize much longer bullets such as the 75 A-Max, but I've also seen those bullets launched from some 1:9 barrels make less than round holes.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nanuaq2013 View Post
    "1-in-12 Inches
    This is the slowest twist still seen in large numbers on AR-15s and other .223s. Though far better than the 1-in-14 twist, it is still unsuited for some of the premium loads developed over the past decade. Conventional wisdom suggests this twist rate is perfect for bullets in the 55-to 60-grain range, though most will stabilize the common 62-grain FMJ rounds. If you hunt prairie dogs or coyotes with lightweight .223 bullets, this twist rate will do fine for your needs. Doubletapís 55-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip load generates 3,300 feet per second of velocity out of a 22-inch barrel, and will easily stabilize in this twist rate."
    Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/2013/12/2...#ixzz2pktCFiDE

    I found this gem and was wondering if they shoot at the least 1moa at 100 yards?

    I would be highly skeptical! I think the greater interest/intent in that tidbit is the attempt by the author to sell product for sponsors of the magazine. His justification leans on RPM to legitimze the slow rate of twist, while RPM plays a roll in stability, counting on a rifle to handle a hot load-acheive stated FPS AND shoot it accurately, are enitirely different things. It would be easy to burn $100-200+ fiddling around with handloads trying to make it work before realisation set in that it is a failure, now you are half way to a new barrel, or rifle, with frustration as icing on the cake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    Concerning .224 diameter barrels, 1:12 is a slow twist for the heavier (actually think longer rather than weight) bullets, though I've seen them handle various 60 grain bullets very accurately. 1:9 is plenty of twist for the Barnes 62 grain TSX as well as the 75 grain Hornady BTHP when fired at .223 velocities and those bullets are longer than other 62 grain offerings. I've seen barrels marked as 1:9 stabilize much longer bullets such as the 75 A-Max, but I've also seen those bullets launched from some 1:9 barrels make less than round holes.
    I'll verify some of what you said 1Cor.


    My 1:9 bbl shoots 77 grain nosler hpbt's really well (to 100 yds at least), but keyholes with the 75 A-max at the same yardage.

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    There is a lot of Variables at play here.....as stated before your more then likely a bit to slow a twist for the 62 grainers, due to bullet length and design...can you provide more data on the particular bullet your speaking of? ... The most common Bulk 62 grainers are FMJBT is that is what your referring to? . using this for the 62 grain as a base point-length and design roughly estimating 3200 FPS .......

    Untitled picture.png


    The same bullet weight in a different non boat tail configuration can like a 1:11 twist.......this weight would not be my first choice for load work up in that slow a twist.

    However if you have a bunch on hand it never harms anything to load a few and see what they do.
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    I've never had a problem getting any of my 1:9 barrels to shoot SMK 69 grain bullets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskanTides View Post
    There is a lot of Variables at play here.....as stated before your more then likely a bit to slow a twist for the 62 grainers, due to bullet length and design...can you provide more data on the particular bullet your speaking of? ... The most common Bulk 62 grainers are FMJBT is that is what your referring to? . using this for the 62 grain as a base point-length and design roughly estimating 3200 FPS .......

    Untitled picture.png


    The same bullet weight in a different non boat tail configuration can like a 1:11 twist.......this weight would not be my first choice for load work up in that slow a twist.

    However if you have a bunch on hand it never harms anything to load a few and see what they do.
    I was wanting to try the 62gr M855/XM855 as they would be a bit cheaper than hollow point/vmax varmint bullets and in more bulk.
    I read that since they're steel core they're a bit longer (as long as some 70grs?) and that it would be harder for 1:12 to stabilize.
    I think I'll spend some money to get 60grain SP for hunting purposed but I can live with shooting vmaxs and some FMJBT 55gr.
    I think I'll start to reload later in the year and try out 45-60 gr bullets from SP to HP for all my needs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nanuaq2013 View Post
    I was wanting to try the 62gr M855/XM855 as they would be a bit cheaper than hollow point/vmax varmint bullets and in more bulk.
    I read that since they're steel core they're a bit longer (as long as some 70grs?) and that it would be harder for 1:12 to stabilize.
    I think I'll spend some money to get 60grain SP for hunting purposed but I can live with shooting vmaxs and some FMJBT 55gr.
    I think I'll start to reload later in the year and try out 45-60 gr bullets from SP to HP for all my needs.
    I think you might find the best accuracy with somthing like the 55 grain Vmax..... You asked a very specific question thus i was trying to spare you a winded post.... The 60 grainers are going to be on the edge of your limit.... But i think they will stabilize. Who knows they might shoot great..... A computer program can only calculate a limited set if variables...

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    My Rem 1/12 likes most 52gr HPs. The Sierra and Speer match 52grs both work very well.

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