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Thread: favourite trip of September....ode to the Scott

  1. #1
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    Default favourite trip of September....ode to the Scott

    Still can't believe they stopped making these big freighters. Someone will step it up.... our favourite moment

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2QJN...ature=youtu.be

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    I wonder if there is a viable market out there? How many of these big freighters can you sell every year? Would you be better off making a higher quality/lighter composite freighter, with more options? Is there going to be a market down the road for freighter canoes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    I wonder if there is a viable market out there? How many of these big freighters can you sell every year? Would you be better off making a higher quality/lighter composite freighter, with more options? Is there going to be a market down the road for freighter canoes.

    well. If you could make a big freighter in light weight lay up to come in at 150 pounds that would be a lot more portable than the Scott's 250 pounds. I found it interesting that weight savings in kevlar wasn't as much in Scott's lay-up as I hoped...about 10%. More weight savings would need a more sophisticated lay-up. Problem is price-point....light means expensive and how much are people willing to pay?

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    I don't think that Scott was attempting to keep up with composite technology. They were stuck in a rut. Using chopped mat which absorbs so much resin and is difficult to seal. Also keeping moisture out of your glass and structure is almost impossible with chopped mat when you are banging these these on river bottoms. Scott should have offered a more river specific type hull as an option. Also why not offer a lighter/tougher composite layup as an option? I hope someone picks up the freighter line and makes it viable. I don't have enough knowledge about the freighter market to even make an educated guess. Being in Alaska and seeing this market size, you are looking at a pretty small number of boats sold every year. The cheap alum Jon Or Lund type boats have the Native market. Someone could market these and change that though. The price of fuel in the village is changing that big engine-go fast mentality. Canada holds the key to the freighter market, the demand is there. That really is where the majority of the market lies....also building boats way over on the East coast, and charging a stiff shipping penalty, doesn't make much business sense. It would be interesting to hear from some of the Scott distributors as to what they are going to offer to their customers now.

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    When I take my freighter with surface drive anywhere in the Yukon I attract a crowd. Mostly First Nations guys....the older guys like the boat...the young guys like the motor. Not that many in love with both. Those interested in the new fangled motor are unlikely to go with a freighter.

    Maybe some nostalgia will bring back the freighter, but most guys seem pretty happy with their flat bottomed jet boats.
    Seems like those interested in the surface drive would be more likely to buy oruse a flat bottomed boat as well. The aesthetic points of a freighter along with weight to carry ratio seem to inspire very few.

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    Your video clips show the added flexibility by using a surface drive, just cannot to those places with a standard outboard. Never mind that I still cringe every time I see your canoe go over that dam...

    As for the Scott freighter, I always draw a crowd at the ramp... so much interest in learning about that canoe. I believe the Scott lineup covered the range of freighter sizes well (Albany, HB, James Bay), although I wonder about the need for the James Bay. But as mentioned here, there channel to market was hurting them and upgrading the manufacturing process could possibly improve the product line.

    I learned of these canoes by visiting hunting/fishing camps in Maine, and know of just a few examples (like me) of those that bought one. I never saw one on a lake or river outside of those camps. I continue to be optimistic that a sharp business type looks at those molds as a business opportunity, and can develop a manufacturing/marketing plan to get this canoes back in play. It was not easy for me to get mine... too many hoops to jump through, and most folks would walk away from that experience (maybe run).

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    The Hudson Bay is quite popular in northern Maine. I know 9 people who own that model. Too bad that they did to make it.

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