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Thread: Index of North American Bear fatalities...

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    Default Index of North American Bear fatalities...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...rica_by_decade

    The last six attacks of the 1990's were all contributed to Brown bears...amazing...

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...rica_by_decade

    The last six attacks of the 1990's were all contributed to Brown bears...amazing...
    Yep i guess brownies/grizz are more likely to attack you if the situation presents itself...

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    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...rica_by_decade

    The last six attacks of the 1990's were all contributed to Brown bears...amazing...

    That is a very informative web site you posted there. However, that covers only fatalities. As over 90% of bear attacks are not fatal, I thought I would post this one below. It covers attacks in Alaska only, bear species, and fatalities..

    http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/br..._conflicts.htm

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Flintlock great link,thanks

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    only one blackie in AK the story on that one sounds interesting to say the least. Lots of oil workers too
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by svehunter View Post
    Originally Posted by gogoalie
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ca_by_dec ade

    The last six attacks of the 1990's were all contributed to Brown bears...amazing...
    Yep i guess brownies/grizz are more likely to attack you if the situation presents itself...
    Frankly, I think it's because there are more brown bears out there than in the past.

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    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Frankly, I think it's because there are more brown bears out there than in the past.
    hmmm maybe, but i think a brown bear can be more aggresive then a blackie just my 2 cents

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    Quote Originally Posted by svehunter View Post
    Originally Posted by Mark
    Frankly, I think it's because there are more brown bears out there than in the past.
    hmmm maybe, but i think a brown bear can be more aggresive then a blackie just my 2 cents
    Oh, no doubt about that, especially in surprise or sow/cub situations.

    But if numbers of both bears and humans are up, the expected result would be an increase in clashes.

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    Aren't there something like 40 billion black bear on the planet?

    Comparing black bears and brown bears is a ridiculous ritual. It is something like comparing a doberman to a pitbull. Both are dogs...both have teeth...both can be mean...both have bitten people...both have been involved in fatal attacks on humans. Yet, they are two different animals.

    I have seen an exceptionally large black bear run full tilt away from a very small brownie. That he was at least 2.5 times the size of his competitor meant nothing to him... he didn't even bother to find out. All he did was put his nose in the air and BOLT!

    To me the differences between the two are so vast that they should not find themselves in the same category.

    Black bear's claws are intended for climbing trees. Great for opportunistically getting to the bird feeder, or, fleeing your dog.

    Brown bear's claws are extended for ripping, shredding, digging, and distributing impact over a greater area.

    Do brown bears run away? Yup. Most of the time.

    Do black bears attack? Yup. Rarely.

    What motivates them to run away or attack?

    I'll take an agitated blackie over a surprised brownie any day of the week where my own life is concerened. I'd take a starving blackie over a sow brownie with cubs where my life is concerend. I'd take a charging black bear with a .22 pistol over a charging brownie with a lever 30/30 where my life is concerened.

    Two entirely different animals as far as my life is concerened I guess.

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    And then I went back and previewed Flintlock's link after I posted. My opinion has not changed one bit.

    I don't remember the guy's name? Gurerro? Something like that. Wrote a book called Bear Attacks. As far as I'm concerned, that has been the best overview that has come along so far. Aside from the fact that it was a good read, it has been confirmed in my own life several times over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoggyMountain View Post
    Aren't there something like 40 billion black bear on the planet?....
    Source:

    The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. It lives throughout much of the continent, from northern Canada and Alaska south into Mexico, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This includes 41 of the 50 U.S. states and all Canadian provinces except Prince Edward Island. .....Although there were probably once as many as two million black bears in North America long before European colonization, the population declined to a low of 200,000 as a result of habitat destruction and unrestricted hunting. By current estimates, more than 800,000 are living today on the continent.....
    Source:

    The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is an omnivorous mammal of the order carnivora, distributed across much of northern Eurasia and North America. It weighs between 100–700 kg (220-1,500 pounds) and its larger populations match the Polar bear as the largest extant land carnivores. While the brown bear's range has shrunk, and it has faced local extinctions, it remains listed as a least concern species with a total population of approximately 200,000. Its principal range countries are Russia, the United States (especially Alaska), and Canada.
    Finally:

    .....There were about 52 recorded deaths due to black bears between 1900 and 2003 and about 50 deaths due to brown bears and about 5 due to polar bears in the same period.....
    Conclusion:

    1) There are 4 times as many black bears out there than brown bears worldwide, and since 3/4 of the world's brown bears inhabit Eurasia and all black bears live in North America, that means there are about 16 times as many black bears here than brown bears.

    2) Black bears killed a couple more people in North America than brown bears did over the past century.

    3) Therefore, black bears are about 16 times less likely to kill than a brown bear, but since there are more of them out there to kill you, they're probably just as dangerous if you're the type to frolick in the woods unarmed.

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    Default Polar Bear Attacks

    I see there were no polar bear attacks listed on the wikipedia site. I know of one fatality that occurred in Pt. Lay in the early/mid 90's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MyKC395 View Post
    I see there were no polar bear attacks listed on the wikipedia site. I know of one fatality that occurred in Pt. Lay in the early/mid 90's.
    In the link on my earlier post on this thread, I counted six documented fatalities between 1900-2002 in Alaska from polar bear attack. Those are just the ones we know about and only includes fatalities.

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    Thumbs up Thanks for the info, guys

    A big thank you to gogoalie and Flintlock for finding these links and posting them! Wow... amazing information! There have been a lot more attacks than I recall hearing about over the years. Fantastic research. Good job.

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