Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 66

Thread: Handloading Technique Sharing

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default Handloading Technique Sharing

    Yentlemen;

    Every once in a great while, I find a great, or greater than the way I was doin it, way to accomplish a Handloading step.

    I've got one I'd like to share, for your consideration, and also in the hopes of learning some method that you've learned or think is worth sharing.

    I'm gonna start off with mine, and wait with abated breath for YOUR tip.

    I trim my brass as a step in case preparation. I normally use my Forster case trimmer. If the brass is too long, enough, it will leave sharp edges, which I chamfer inside and outside. Nothing new here......

    However, this process can leave a rough end, on the end of the necks, with shaving, even, but I've discovered a way to solve this problem, to the extent it is a problem. I don't like it, so I consider it a problem.

    I got this partially from a source other than my own slow thinking brain, and so hopefully it's not as bad as some of my other ideas.

    Get a Nut Driver attachment if you wanna use your Drill Motor, or just a Nut Driver if you don't. The Driver end should be quite a bit larger than the case neck.

    Takey this Nut Driver and put some of that Brillo, Copper lookin stuff, or even Steel Wool into the Driver end, and press it down firmly. If you use steel wool, shouldn't matter if it's coarse steel wool.

    With mine in my drill motor, I just push the case neck firmly into driver against the stuff, and give it a spin. It sure smoothes the end up, all rounded, like, I like it.

    I hope that helps somebody, and I hope that somebody will pass along something of the same order.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Thats a pretty good idea. I have used an empty shotgun shell with a wad of steel wool inside. Yep, I know I'm cheap.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default

    rbuck:

    I never thought of that. I'll try it.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  4. #4

    Default

    You might try putting one of those green scotch cleaning pads in the palm of your hand and twist the mouth of the case in it. It works pretty good.
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
    ~ John Quincy Adams

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    You might try putting one of those green scotch cleaning pads in the palm of your hand and twist the mouth of the case in it. It works pretty good.
    I've done that a cupla three times.

    I like something that's tougher, though.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default

    I was hoping for tips and efficient methods to accomplish tasks OTHER than smoothing trimmed brass.

    Preferred tools etc. Anything or any method, process, that has solved a problem you've had.

    Thanks
    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default

    I've been prepping 30-30 brass recently, 160 rounds. I've been wiping the lube off with those little hand wipes.

    They do a better job than a cloth, or paper towel, which is what I normally use.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Much of the brass prep I do is done on a mini lathe using the Lee case trimmer tools. The shell holder is chucked and then the brass spins and then I can hold which ever tool I need against the spinning brass. This is probably backwards from what most do but it works well with the lathe and lee tools. If I'm using oil based lube, I pour a little gas in a container then roll the cases in that, then a quick wipe down with a cotton rag. It gets all the oil off quick and dries real fast.

  9. #9

    Default

    Speaking of lube, when I switched One Shot to Imperial Sizing Wax i thought the Imperial was the greatest ever and it was and is great stuff, but after reading a couple of posts here a while back, I decided to try Unique and it is just as good as Imperial and maybe a tad better and only costs about 1/4th as much.

    And here's a technique I use in sizing. Just sized some 300 RUM brass last night. I take a stiff nylon bore brush and dry scrub the inside of the necks good, then I take the case and stick the neck into the Unique and give it a twist and pull it out. Then I rub the case down with a very small amount of lube and run it through the Redding FL die. I use a slow and smooth stroke and my neck runout is about .0005 to .002 Mostly .001 give or take. Not too bad. Then I swab out the inside of the neck with a Q-tip and wipe the cases down with a paper towel. I don't mind a little film of lube on the case. Also, I don't tumble the cases much anymore. Just give the outside of the necks a little scrubbing with a scotch pad and good to go. Between that and handling/sizing with the Unique (or Imperial) it keeps the cases looking good.
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
    ~ John Quincy Adams

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Mind if I ask a somewhat dense question? I'm relatively new to the reloading world. I'm not a green newbie, but I haven't been reloading for 30 years, so I consider myself new. Anyway, I've been using mineral oil for case lube mainly because it's dirt cheap and I have a ton still left from a while ago. Any reason why that's bad? I've heard to wipe it off, but honestly by the time I'm done with the process and handling, I can't even feel it on the cases.

    FYI, I apply the mineral oil like this. I have a single bounty paper towel folded in quarters so that it fits into a ziploc bag. I dropped a bit of oil on the towel and put it in the bag and let is sit for a couple days. That even distributed the oil into the entire towel. Now, I just pull the towel out and lay it on top of the ziploc. Grab about 5 cases and lay them on the towel and roll them once. I don't press so it's not saturated, and it's barely even getting on the case, but it's enough to tell a difference. By the time I'm done loading the cases, I can barely even tell if they were oiled.

  11. #11
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I don't pretend to be any kind of reloading expert. But, when I was having feeding issues on my Remington TI, I considered leaving some imperial sizing wax on them to aid in the feeding. I was cautioned by a very experienced hand loader that would be very dangerous. He said that brass is designed to expend and use fiction to hold it against the chamber to prevent excess pressure from being exerted onto the bolt face.

    It makes sense once I thought about it so I always make sure to remove all lube from my finished rounds now.

    As I said, I took his word and never researched it further.

    Be safe

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  12. #12
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I don't pretend to be any kind of reloading expert. But, when I was having feeding issues on my Remington TI, I considered leaving some imperial sizing wax on them to aid in the feeding. I was cautioned by a very experienced hand loader that would be very dangerous. He said that brass is designed to expend and use fiction to hold it against the chamber to prevent excess pressure from being exerted onto the bolt face.

    It makes sense once I thought about it so I always make sure to remove all lube from my finished rounds now.

    As I said, I took his word and never researched it further.

    Be safe

    Steve
    That's a really interesting thing to ponder! But I don't think is holds water. Actual physical pressure measurements in recent years have corroborated physics theory that pressure is exerted equally in all directions and on all surfaces, including the bolt face. Friction between case and chamber wall is not resisting rearward thrust of acceleration, so any lube would be insignificant.

    Seems to me that the brass case only really perform 2 functions:

    1) it serves as a package, a carrier to conveniently carry the ignition source, powder, and projectile into the chamber.

    2) during during ignition and burning of the powder, it's relatively soft and pliable medium serves as a gasketing medium to seal off any small leaks in the chamber.

    The brass material itself is not strong enough, nor would any friction bond created between chamber wall and brass be strong enough to hold against thrust. The chamber, of which the bolt, or breach face, is an integral part, is containing the all the force equally within its parts. The brass is only serving as "plumbers putty" to seal any small leaks.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  13. #13

    Default

    Appreciate the heads up Steve. I have read that as well and I have read counter theories. I do wipe off as much as I can with a paper towel but it leaves a slight film on the case and it sorta dries on the case. I've been doing it a while and haven't noticed anything unusual. I would think the bolt and receiver would be engineered to take the possible stresses of any bolt thrust in the normal of the cartridge, i.e. 65K psi and under, in the event the case or chamber wall was inadvertently contaminated with some slippery substance.

    I wonder which would grip a chamber wall better... A RUM case with a .025" taper with some lube residue on it or a dry and polished 375 HH case with .064" of taper?
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
    ~ John Quincy Adams

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I don't pretend to be any kind of reloading expert. But, when I was having feeding issues on my Remington TI, I considered leaving some imperial sizing wax on them to aid in the feeding. I was cautioned by a very experienced hand loader that would be very dangerous. He said that brass is designed to expend and use fiction to hold it against the chamber to prevent excess pressure from being exerted onto the bolt face.

    It makes sense once I thought about it so I always make sure to remove all lube from my finished rounds now.

    As I said, I took his word and never researched it further.

    Be safe

    Steve
    Please for all that is good, don't think I'm arguing. I have to preface with that because I don't want anyone to think I'm trying to argue. AND I'm not going to try to imply anyone is wrong or should change. OK?

    Your post raises some questions that my engineering mind has trouble with. I get the fire forming, but the friction and bolt pressure are difficult to process to me. In a bolt gun, the shell is going to slide back every so slightly into the bolt face and that is what will keep it in place while the case fire forms to the chamber. If the bolt is properly locked, friction would be unnecessary to hold the shell in place.

    In a gas powered semi-auto, they usually have a locked bolt as well and the same will happen. When the gas makes it to the barrel port and unlocks the bolt the pressure backward helps to open the bolt and you don't want friction then, right?

    The only case where I can see an issue might be straight blow back design. Where inertial weight is used to hold the chamber closed and the bolt isn't locked. In that case, a smidge of friction may allow the case to fire form and more of the gas to push the bullet out before the bolt starts to slide open from the opposite forces of the bullet leaving the barrel. Maybe.

    Again, I'm not saying you're wrong or to change anything at all. Just an intellectual exercise. I'm VERY left brained...

  15. #15
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobius View Post
    Please for all that is good, don't think I'm arguing. I have to preface with that because I don't want anyone to think I'm trying to argue. AND I'm not going to try to imply anyone is wrong or should change. OK?

    Your post raises some questions that my engineering mind has trouble with. I get the fire forming, but the friction and bolt pressure are difficult to process to me. In a bolt gun, the shell is going to slide back every so slightly into the bolt face and that is what will keep it in place while the case fire forms to the chamber. If the bolt is properly locked, friction would be unnecessary to hold the shell in place.

    In a gas powered semi-auto, they usually have a locked bolt as well and the same will happen. When the gas makes it to the barrel port and unlocks the bolt the pressure backward helps to open the bolt and you don't want friction then, right?

    The only case where I can see an issue might be straight blow back design. Where inertial weight is used to hold the chamber closed and the bolt isn't locked. In that case, a smidge of friction may allow the case to fire form and more of the gas to push the bullet out before the bolt starts to slide open from the opposite forces of the bullet leaving the barrel. Maybe.

    Again, I'm not saying you're wrong or to change anything at all. Just an intellectual exercise. I'm VERY left brained...
    I agree, the case is just packaging for the powder/projectile/primer that doubles as a gas seal. You could cut the case off above the rim leavening just enough base for gas to seal and the gun will contain the pressure just fine with no case wall friction at all.
     
    There is reason not to fire heavily lubed cases though. You can get a buildup of scorched lube or even carbon from burned lube on the chamber walls that can give sticky extraction or even scored chamber walls.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  16. #16

    Default

    I should probably mention that I use very little lube on the case, not much more than I pull out off the outside of the neck. When sizing the RUM, I have found that if you have too little, the case gets stuck and if too much it gets dents below and on the shoulder and it causes greater runout. And there is a very fine line between too much and too little.

    Sorry for causing a fuss Smitty
    "You will never know how much it cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you make good use of it."
    ~ John Quincy Adams

  17. #17
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobius View Post
    mineral oil for case lube Any reason why that's bad?
    Oils, especially petroleum based oils over time in stored ammo can alter powder burn rates and can seep into primers causing hang-fire or fail-to-fire down the road. I avoid all oils around the reloading bench, I use silicon base spry lubes on the presses and sizing wax on cases. My tiny tin of Imperial Sizing Wax is still half full after 3 years and I load not just for myself but custom ammo for about 15 other guys too so itís cheap enough for me.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  18. #18
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    My favorite press lube is Imperial wax.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  19. #19
    Member pacific23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Whitesboro, Texas
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Do any of you Tumble for a few minutes after reloading?

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,813

    Default

    I believe that the brass DOES stick to the chamber walls on firing and fire forming.

    How this effects the pressure on the bolt or breech block would depend on the cartridge and/or gun. Some case designs have more taper than others, and brass flows differently. I assume the extent that cases stick to the sides varies, as would how dangerous it could be.

    I've heard of deliberately putting and leaving lube on certain cases to help them fire form better. 303 British, IIRC.

    Too much lube on the Case Neck can block expansion and create excessive, even dangerous, neck tension. That seems to be an established fact from some testing, I forget the name of the Authority, that discovered this, with the 30-06 many years ago.

    If the case DIDN'T stick, it could fold, and allow the pressure to get between the case and chamber walls, and that would play havoc with the SEAL. AND, the rifle.

    Also, I've heard of cases fired in Automatic rifles extracting only the case head and leaving the rest of it in the chamber. Some Auto Rifle chambers are FLUTED to prevent that.

    Failing to remove case lube, is not something I'd even consider, let alone recommend. Guns Do blow up from time to time and the reason is not always clear.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •