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Thread: Binos

  1. #1
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Default Binos

    Hello,

    I am chasing down a new set of binos. currently running the nikon atb 10x42 and have had good luck with them. I am looking to upgrade and would like this to be the last time. This has brought me to the swaro el line with the 10x32 and 10x42. I am interested in the lighter bino for my spot and stalk hunting with the amount of time supporting them. I don't want weight to decide the bono though if the extra 10mm make the bino that much brighter. *8oz difference.

    While looking for used binos i can find the 10x42's used for $1500 so i should be able to do a little better if i keep searching. The 10x32's are a little tougher to find used but with time I'm sure i can find some.

    Has anyone been able to play with the 32's in the field? i know most use the 42's and I'm leaning towards those due to availability.

    any thoughts are appreciated
    NRA life Member JVJ

  2. #2

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    10X42 EL SV Swaros. price tag is high but you get that back in critters that you can see. Zeiss HT 10X42 are also very good. Just buy one or the other. CS and supports on both make them worth it.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  3. #3
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I have a couple pairs of the Swaro 8x32. Best glass I ever owned.

    Ditto on the customer service, top notch. }:>
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  4. #4
    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akprideinvegas View Post
    Hello,

    I am chasing down a new set of binos. currently running the nikon atb 10x42 and have had good luck with them. I am looking to upgrade and would like this to be the last time. This has brought me to the swaro el line with the 10x32 and 10x42. I am interested in the lighter bino for my spot and stalk hunting with the amount of time supporting them. I don't want weight to decide the bono though if the extra 10mm make the bino that much brighter. *8oz difference.

    While looking for used binos i can find the 10x42's used for $1500 so i should be able to do a little better if i keep searching. The 10x32's are a little tougher to find used but with time I'm sure i can find some.

    Has anyone been able to play with the 32's in the field? i know most use the 42's and I'm leaning towards those due to availability.

    any thoughts are appreciated
    I have and use the Swarovski 10x32 Travelers and they are really perfect. I use them for mountain hunts so I can care less if the 10x42s are slightly better in low light because there is plenty of light in Alaska when it is time to hunt in the mountains. I compared them and did not see much of a difference, so I will go with the 10x32s all day long. The weight is a huge factor for me and they are slightly smaller and less in the way. Just my opinion though. You can't go wrong with them and I could see everything my buddy's Leica Ultravids 10x42s could see and sometimes more. Good luck, but with the prices starting to get out of reach, act fast.

  5. #5
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    Meopta 10x42HD. The new alpha brand on the street.

  6. #6
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    We have the Swaro 10X42's and the 8X32's. We wish we would have gone with the 10X32's when we bought the second pair. The size and weight are a benefit when packing and for extended glassing but we would like the extra 2X for a "closer look" without setting up the spotter. The "old lady" and I have been fighting over who gets to use the 32's for several years now but love both sets.
    Buy the best you can afford but we wish we had all the money we have spent on "trash glass" over the years.


    PS: It's usually the 32's that get grabbed for a quick ride in the truck or a short hike.

  7. #7

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    Ok, Just a few ideas.

    I spent a lot of time looking at optics this past week in Cabelas, and I did not see any difference between the Swaro EL line and the Zeiss Conquest. The one bino that stuck out the most was the Zeiss Victory. Very nice optics!!! If I was going to spend the money on really expensive binos I would go Zeiss Victory. If I was going to go with second best group I would go with Zeiss Conquest.

  8. #8
    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    Meopta 10x42HD. The new alpha brand on the street.
    Meopta 10x42HD=31.6oz
    Swarovski 10x32=20oz

    Enough said.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PacWestFishTaxidermy View Post
    Meopta 10x42HD=31.6oz
    Swarovski 10x32=20oz

    Enough said.
    That is not enough said. They are two very different binos. Weight isn't the only parameter to consider. The Swaros, 10x32, are also smaller and not well suited to an extended glassing session. I have done that with 8x32 Ultravids and much rather have a more robust binocular such as a 10x42. If I am still hunting and doing occasional glassing then the smaller glass might be fine. Furthermore, the exit pupil, on any 10x42, (4.2) vs. 3.2 on a 10x32, will allow a little more viewing time at sunrise and sunset.
    If weight was the only factor, than the little Swaro Traveler 8x20's would win hands down - at 8 oz. - but you wouldn't be happy very long.

  10. #10
    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    I have been using Swaro 8X30s extensively for over 20yrs and can't say enough good things about them. I've used the lifetime warranty on two sets and the service and timeliness of that service was superb. If I were looking for a 10X, I would be looking for a used set of SLCs. I like a little more weight in 10Xs; it helps take some of the shake out for me.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by akprideinvegas View Post
    Hello,

    I am chasing down a new set of binos. currently running the nikon atb 10x42 and have had good luck with them. I am looking to upgrade and would like this to be the last time. This has brought me to the swaro el line with the 10x32 and 10x42. I am interested in the lighter bino for my spot and stalk hunting with the amount of time supporting them. I don't want weight to decide the bono though if the extra 10mm make the bino that much brighter. *8oz difference.

    While looking for used binos i can find the 10x42's used for $1500 so i should be able to do a little better if i keep searching. The 10x32's are a little tougher to find used but with time I'm sure i can find some.

    Has anyone been able to play with the 32's in the field? i know most use the 42's and I'm leaning towards those due to availability.

    any thoughts are appreciated
    Ak,
    If you are looking at weight as a factor to go with you spot and stalk hunting technique, then you might be zeroing in on 32's. However you said you wanted to upgrade for the last time. You also said you want something "brighter". Brightness is not a factor of power, its a facor of a number called the "exit pupil". To get that number you divide the objective number, let's say 32mm by the power, let's say 10 = 3.2
    Now calculate the exit pupil of an 8x32. 32/8 = 4. The higher the exit pupil number, the more light is available for your eye to accept.
    A 8x42 would be 5.4, a 10x42 would be 4.2.

    The weight of your glass can be a deceptive feature. While the lighter glass feels better in your bino pouch or chest harness, it may be
    a little too light to "settle down" on a windy hillside. Whereas a little more robust binocular uses its weight to steady your viewing. Plus lower powered glass will give you a wider field of view and contribute to being steadier.
    Your best bet is to get to a well stocked shop early or late in the day and look at a variety in the low light. Lots of glass looks good in the brightness of day. Low light separates them out quite nicely. There is a lot to consider. I'd rather have a beater rifle than a beater binocular. Good luck.

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    That is not enough said.
    Ha...!!! You took the words right out of my mouth...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  13. #13
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    Brightness is not a factor of power, its a facor of a number called the "exit pupil". To get that number you divide the objective number, let's say 32mm by the power, let's say 10 = 3.2
    Now calculate the exit pupil of an 8x32. 32/8 = 4. The higher the exit pupil number, the more light is available for your eye to accept.
    A 8x42 would be 5.4, a 10x42 would be 4.2.
    Personally I have a pair of Swaro 7x42 that I absolutely love. Light gathering and field of view is spectacular. I can't tell you how many times the large field of view would allow me to detect movement or color at the very edge of the sight picture. All I need to do is spot the game and after that the spotter takes over.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  14. #14
    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    Really love my zeiss victory 10x32. I understand the exit pupil argument, and have to admit I have never tried them against swaros or leicas, but they blew away my buddy's 10x42 gold rings that were only a hundred bucks or so cheaper at the time. Handy little pieces of glass and a pleasure to look through. I pack them all over the place just to look at stuff.

  15. #15

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    I am "STUNNED" to learn that for 40'some years I have been using "SECOND'CLASS" glass. I am deeply grieved about this. And to think that nearly every professional Alaskan hunting guide was spending 3 to 4 months per year afield with the same crappy second class binoculars. I truly did not need to learn this information.

  16. #16
    Member shimano 33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russp17 View Post
    Ok, Just a few ideas.

    I spent a lot of time looking at optics this past week in Cabelas, and I did not see any difference between the Swaro EL line and the Zeiss Conquest. The one bino that stuck out the most was the Zeiss Victory. Very nice optics!!! If I was going to spend the money on really expensive binos I would go Zeiss Victory. If I was going to go with second best group I would go with Zeiss Conquest.
    As mentioned, I also compared many Swarows next to the Conquest… While I could tell a difference in the superior glass (Swaro) i was not able to justify spending an extra $1k. I went home with the zeiss Conquest and have not regretted my purchase since.

  17. #17
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    I have a pair of Zeiss 10X25 compact, had them since the early eighties. Hunt with them every year, as well as look at birds and whatnot when not hunting. I use a Leica spotting scope for the far stuff. I don't even feel them on my neck, I keep them in a great little padded cover when I am wearing them. When you are covering a lot of country, that is the way your binocs should feel....don't buy big binos for hunting... You can't go wrong with the compact Zeiss....

  18. #18
    Member PacWestFishTaxidermy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knikglacier View Post
    That is not enough said. They are two very different binos. Weight isn't the only parameter to consider. The Swaros, 10x32, are also smaller and not well suited to an extended glassing session. I have done that with 8x32 Ultravids and much rather have a more robust binocular such as a 10x42. If I am still hunting and doing occasional glassing then the smaller glass might be fine. Furthermore, the exit pupil, on any 10x42, (4.2) vs. 3.2 on a 10x32, will allow a little more viewing time at sunrise and sunset.
    If weight was the only factor, than the little Swaro Traveler 8x20's would win hands down - at 8 oz. - but you wouldn't be happy very long.
    Weight was my main issue. I did not mean it as a blanket statement on other people's preferences.

  19. #19

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    I have been looking through Leupold glass for the last 15 to 20 years an was well satisfied with them. I am surprised they have not been mentioned.

  20. #20

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    I've owned and carried good glass in the past. 50mm porro prism...40mm roof prism...25mm, etc. Zeiss, Leica, etc. My favorite binocs were 10x40 Zeiss Classics. I sold those a few years ago and then decided I would buy my ultimate hunting binocular. I checked the Big 3 and others. I evaluated 50mm down to 30mm. I set a budget high enough to buy most anything I wanted. I figured to end up with Swaro EL units, but (for me) the ergonomics were awful. I figured to end up with 40mm (again) but my eval didn't reveal enough light gain to make 40 or 42mm a clear winner. I figured a lot of things, and they changed when I got down to tight and realistic comparisons. I spoke to a very trusted individual who makes his living selling extreme high-end optics and little else. His thoughts on optics-in-use were really (excuse me) eye-opening. I finally understand that money has very little to do with whether your glass will help get you to an animal you desire. Some of the alpha glass has qualities which enhance the viewing experience, but don't actually do anything better in terms of seeing, finding and differentiating. It's akin to comparing 3 build levels of the same pickup. They'll all do the job. The manufacturer will be selling the idea that more money does it better and with more style. My current binoculars are easy to carry, fairly compact and reasonably light in weight. Their clarity is superb, and my half-century old eyes could not avail themselves of more. (Yes...the quality of your vision is the other huge part of the optics equation.) Their ergonomics suit me perfectly, and I can/do spend hours sitting and glassing with them. I haven't once wished for anything different since spending the money. I have evaluated binoculars costing a LOT more money (than I paid at the time) and the performance gain doesn't exist for me and my eyes. The bottom line is to know yourself, trust your eyes, and buy glass based on what you know and see...not what your hear, believe or are told. Be independent minded and do some personal research...otherwise it's guesswork to a degree.

    I ended up buying Zeiss Victory 10x32 units a few years back. I got the green rubber armored (I like green!) ones with Lotu-tec coatings. I found a good deal and got them at around $1,500. If I was buying today, I'd probably look at the Zeiss Conquest very hard.

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