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Thread: fly materials to buy

  1. #1

    Default fly materials to buy

    Hey again

    I'm gettin ready to head to my local fly shop to buy some material for rainbows and grayling patterns. I dont wanna tie a hundred different flys, so my question is what are a few rock solid patterns that will land me a trophy or two?

    I'll be in AK july 4th-12th and im trying to land a king at least once as well, but im guessing i can catch them on stone fly or caddis pattern with and egg.

  2. #2

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    You'll need little to nab grayling.

    First and foremost, a griffths gnat, 14 or 16's, you'll need peacock hurl and grizzly hackle (pick up the 100 packs by whiting, best hackle you can buy!!!)

    Recipe
    dry fly hook, 14 or 16 fine wire
    hackle grizzly
    body 2-3 peacock hurls wrapped as one

    Tie in hackle first, then hurl, wrap the hurl, then the hackle and your done. THE BEST grayling fly for dries bar none.

    Next would be a bright green adult caddis. I prefer the troth style.
    Recipe,
    hook 14 or 16 dry fly fine wire
    hackle, brown/dun/grizzly
    body, olive to bright green dry fly dubbing
    rib, (optional) super fine wire counter wrapped over hackle
    wing, elk hair. I prefer non bleached seems to float better.

    simple fly to tie. Tie in wire (again optional), next tie hackle, then dub your body, leave TWO hook eyes short of the eye of the hook for your wing tie in point and room for a head. Next wrap your hackle, more turns the better it'll float (5 or 6 is normal). Now counter wrap your wire over your hackle. Then tie in the wing and clip the head short leaving enough room to get to your hook eye. Fly is finished.


    last dry would be a cahill parachute. Or any white/cream parachute. Something that imitates a stuck emerger will work well when the 1st two flys fail, usually an early morning fly for me.

    Nymphs is also a 3 fly game.

    First and foremost a Pheasant tail Nymph (also known as PT).

    hook 12 or 14 nymph or dry fly.
    Bead, I prefer gold, appropriate size for the hook of choice
    tail and abdomon pt fibers
    rib copper wire counter wrapped
    wing case and legs, more pt fibers
    thorax, peacock hurl.

    Tie in your rib. Next tie in your tail using 3-5 pieces of tail feathers. To make the abdomen, tie off your tail, then wrap the abdomen with the but ends. I prefer to go all the way up to the bead or till the buts are to short to wrap to fill the fly out. Next counter wrap your wire rib and tie off. Now take a bundle (sized appropriate for the sized fly you are tying) and tie in 1 to 1 1/2 length of hook shank, this will give you those nice legs if you so want them. Now tie in 3 or 4 (or more) pieces of hurl and wrap your thorax. Pull the wing chase (bundle of pt fibers) over the hurl, tie off and seperate 3 or 4 to each side for your legs. They should naturally fold back with thread pressure, if not take a couple wraps over the top of them behind the bead and they'll lay back nicely. Now tie off and your done. This is my go to nymph when dries fail (which is pretty rare on grayling in summer).

    Next would be an bead head caddis larva. Simple to tie.

    hook size 12
    bead of choice I prefer gold again
    chartuese antron yarn
    moderate to dark dubbing

    Tie in the antron and twist it up with a dubbing whirl. Tie off about a bead distance behind the hook eye. Now dub on some hurl. This is a good deep water or cold water day fly dropper, or under and indicator.

    White (or pearl if you can find it) scud.

    My early season go to fly also works well in summer or on dirty water days. It is also a little more complex to tie though not difficult.

    Hook size 12 scud hook
    bead copper is what I prefer
    tail aunt lydias sparkle yarn (not sure if they make it anymore in this color or not)
    rib, silver/red wire
    shell back, anything pearl, I use the ice crystals they sell at xmas time. It's a little small for a 12 hook but it works. You can find an uncut piece of the same stuff at any fly tyin shop. Or you can go with a clear bag.
    Body Is dubbed 50 50 aunt lydias and white/cream hares ear dubbing. Mix with dubbing cards if you can find them.
    Legs are picked out body like on any scud.

    how to tie it. Again it's pretty simple.
    tie in 1 strand of the Aunt lydias sparkle yarn (it's 3 ply I believe) for the tail, keep it short. Now tie in your wire rib. Next is the shell back. now dub your body right up to the bead. fold over the shell back. wrap your wire and tie it all off. Lastly pick out inbetween the ribs to give you some legs. You dont have to get to carried away with the legs or dont do it at all, they'll take it either way.

    These 6 flies will work in lakes streams or rivers and is all you need for grayling. I've listed them in order of preference for summer fishing. My order changes slightly for spring or fall however I carry the same 6 flies. The griffiths is the ultimate for grayling all summer long, the caddis being a close second. The parachute as mentioned is more of an early morning or really late nite fly when things start slowing down. The only thing about a grayling in a creek/river is getting a drag free drift. You can wake and get takers however the big boys much prefer drag free. Do this with a griffiths and you'll catch enough fish you'll wonder why you have 5 other patterns with you.

    The nymphs. The pt reigns supreme in summer. Though I rarely fish it, you can swing, twitch or just dead drift it. The other caddis and pearl scud are more so backups or flies I go to when fish are put down. The pearl scud is also a good dirty water fly, especially when that dirty water starts to clear up.

    Egg patterns will work but are not needed for grayling, same with egg sucking leeches. People love them and fish will hit them, but not as often as these 6.

    Places to go. Upper chena is good bank fishing with lots of access and lots of water to fish by yourself. Delta clear water is as good as it gets. It does however lend itself to floating or river boating much more so then bank fishing. You'll be somewhat limited on the bank though the quality of grayling on this river is well worth the effort!!! Nome is a hot place for big grayling also if you find yourself that way. I've heard the denali highway is good however have never bothered to fish it. UC and DCW are just to good to go beat myself up on that road. Ah crap, I did it, got negative about a place, mods please dont yank this thread .

    There you have it. I hope it helps. I'll be gone skippering a boat all summer. I'm sure moose will post eventually giving you input if you need more. Have a great trip and post some pics this fall, I'd love to see them!

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Buy yourself a metz #2 saddle in grizzly, and one in brown, some natural and some bleached deer hair, a high an dry dubbing assortment, some gold beads and some rabbit faces and maybe a pheasant tail and peacock. Then you can do stimulators, gold ribbed hares ear, and pt nymphs. You can hardly go wrong with black wooly buggers either.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4

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    You guys are awesome.

    Will those flys catch me trout as well?

  5. #5
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    Default bunny hair for me

    If I was gonna target big rainbows in big water i would take nothing more than an assortment of dyed bunny hair to imitate flesh. I don't even tye flies.... just a bait loop with a half a hand sized chunk of hair.... we been gettin the big boys to bite on this for many years and when you match the color its like magic... the big ones seem to be willing to move to come and get it. we use rit dye and get an assortment of colors from bright orange ( works great when fish are cleaned and discarded nearby) all the way toned down to off white. pm me if you want to know more..... and best of luck.

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    gotfish, you ever have luck on ham n eggs?

  7. #7
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    Default ham and eggs

    Hey, If you are referring to a bead to go with the hair the answer is a big yes. I always use a bead with my hair.... when you get the two colors right its like taking candy from a baby.... If you find deep little cuts along the banks, especially those with branches hanging in them to catch the carcasses, this pattern is deadly. It works the best if you can create a little slack in your line to allow it to rise and fall with the currents..... and its the best big trout producer i know of.

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbkg View Post
    You guys are awesome.

    Will those flys catch me trout as well?
    Depends on where you are fishing, since its early july and you are not fishing the russian (I'm guessing) flesh isn't your best choice. If you are fishing out west there are tremendous blue winged olive hatches out there so dries in sizes 12-20 would be the most fun. If you are fishing S.C. streams like the parks highway streams or in the susitna drainage at all the nymphs I mentioned as well as black wooly buggers should produce fish. If you are somewhere thats way far away from people I'd suggest swinging a fly like a turks tarantula skating dries is often productive when other things aren't. Grayling are fairly un picky however I've seen them key in on big mayflies. I tie tons of different flies because I get bored with just a few but always seem to turn back to pheasant tail, prince, and gold ribbed hares ear nymphs, and stimulators and tangle lake teasers, untill the kings and pinks start dropping eggs (once that happens I'm fishing beads) the exceptions being durning smolt migration in early june when I use fry flies, and at the russian when the red fishing is good (and I'm using flesh)

    Good luck,
    AKPM
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9

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    I'm new to the dry fly game and I apreciate all the info!

    My next question is do I just want regulare floating line? Do I need backing?

    Do you run 'stingers' when you dry fly fish or just a single fly?

    Thanks again!

    less than a month and I'm on my way!

  10. #10

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    for dry fly fishing yes you'll want a floating line.

    No you dont run or need stingers on dries.

    Backing is a yes. For two reasons. Big fish and bigger diameter on the spool. Hate to see a guy loose flylines due to a big trout in fast water. Fly lines aint cheap! It also increases the diameter of the spool allowing you to pick up line faster. On a 1 to 1 reel and big fish any little help you can get is a bonus. I've been into my backing a few times on my 3 weight and was thankful there was enough. On a trip to Ketchikan fishing dollies, we got into steelies (on the same 3 weight I fish grayling with ugg). Second trip was in the chena river. Never did land the fish. Could have been a big big whitefish or possibly a small sheefish. Regardless the 12 bucks or so of backing saved a 70 buck fly line!

    Fishing in southeast is great. Halibut fishing this summer is hot!!!!

  11. #11
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'll throw a dropper on where legal usually a small wet fly like a gray hackled peacock, heck I use droppers all over the place where legal, for salmon, trout, whatever.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  12. #12

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    I believe the dropper and stinger references made were two different thoughts. Stingers being a 2 hook rig on one bug.

    Droppers are a good thing if you can cast them. I hate casting them, seems I have a nack for getting a tailing loop every now and then and the 2nd hook likes to grab on just to let me know how bad my casting really is, ugg!

    fish the griffiths, you'll have no need for a dropper on grayling!

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