Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Who runs a bay boat?

  1. #1
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default Who runs a bay boat?

    Just pure curiosity. I just moved back to Kodiak and I brought my 20' Ranger with me and it's exceeded my expectations for near shore (8-12 mile runs) fly casting for rockfish, ling, salmon and halibut. I've seen a couple bay boats for sale and a couple parked, but not yet another out fishing.

    Any others out there with silly notions of fishing from anything less than a 40' tin boat with 700 hp?

  2. #2
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Holy crap! That many? Lol, I should start a club...

  3. #3

    Default jet boat

    ran a 20' wooldridge sport with 150 HP OBJ & full remote kicker for backup lots of times out of whittier & seward.
    10-degree in the back 18-degree in the bow, pounded pretty good if chop higher than 1 ft,
    but had it out in 2'+ chop and maybe 6 ft swells (not at the same time !)
    boat would sink like a stone if swamped, so always carried a self inflating 6-man life raft...........
    It at least had full windshield and self draining bow with enlarged drainage holes so no water could pile up in the bow pit
    went to both capes in resurrection bay and far as dutch group in PWS.
    I saw a 16' flat bottom john boat past Cape Aiilak, but that seemed a bit of a push to me............
    People used to run Lund & Klamath 18' with open bows all over the place

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I think you'll find most members on the forum are in Southcentral (same with most residients in the state) and hence most people run 50-100 miles rt when fishing in the salt.

    That's the real rub when in comes to taking smaller boats out in the salt. There may be days that allow you to make it out safely and some locations are close enough to port to make it back before things get too rough. That said, when one considers average days and average conditions, there is a reason the vast majority of people run boats that are better able to safely handle those conditions.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  5. #5
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I think you'll find most members on the forum are in Southcentral (same with most residients in the state) and hence most people run 50-100 miles rt when fishing in the salt.

    That's the real rub when in comes to taking smaller boats out in the salt. There may be days that allow you to make it out safely and some locations are close enough to port to make it back before things get too rough. That said, when one considers average days and average conditions, there is a reason the vast majority of people run boats that are better able to safely handle those conditions.
    Oh absolutely. I totally understand why most guys own the boats they do. I also realize I'm a very "niche" boat owner. I fly cast...that's it. I don't hunt from it, sleep in it or even troll or jig from it. I do fish for all the "normal" species; halibut to the lowly rock fish, but I'm happiest around pinnacles and water less than 200' deep and therefore don't "need" to make the monster runs to the continental shelf.

    I just figured there'd be other guys who fish within a dozen miles of shore, and like to get back into smaller water and cast to structure, bait balls, etc...and run a boat with a trolling motor.

  6. #6

    Default

    Not to rain on the parade Kodiak but have ya taken the time to wonder why you don't see anyone else doing it?
    8-12 miles offshore (and far less really) can get you in a world of hurt. Just because you can do it, should you? Have you fallen in the water here?
    I'm thinking you've never been scared spitless by the ocean? I can totally see using that kind of boat in conditions they were designed for; the flats, sheltered bays and in the "smaller" water you mentioned. A dozen miles offshore in unprotected waters is not small, especially in water that can kill ya in minutes.
    I think bare minimum here in Alaska for ocean fishing skiff would be a 18' Klamath, they have a high bow that will handle steeper chop and I'd think you could still flyfish out of it.
    Not tryin to be hard but it's tragic when bad stuff happens to folks on the water, even in way more capable boats than that ranger and closer or shore.
    Check out Quickwater Adventure water taxi/transport services: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quick...37553606260978

  7. #7
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Most Bristol Bay boats, and particularly the newer ones are designed for three main things: packing a bunch of fish in the holds (possibly w/ refrigeration), shallow draft, and speed (speed being the most recent feature). Not sure how well that combination equates to a recreational boat, but it always comes down to the cost. Most of them have comfortably sized cabins and amenities or enough space to make it so. The fact they most are designed to be able to go dry means you can beach it and go exploring if you want. If the engine(s) are effieient at lower speeds/loads, they might be feasible rec boats.
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  8. #8
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    Most Bristol Bay boats, and particularly the newer ones are designed for three main things: packing a bunch of fish in the holds (possibly w/ refrigeration), shallow draft, and speed (speed being the most recent feature). Not sure how well that combination equates to a recreational boat, but it always comes down to the cost. Most of them have comfortably sized cabins and amenities or enough space to make it so. The fact they most are designed to be able to go dry means you can beach it and go exploring if you want. If the engine(s) are effieient at lower speeds/loads, they might be feasible rec boats.
    Whats a Bristol Bay gillnetter got to do with a bass/flats boat ?? besides having the same 1st letter ??? I think you posted in the wrong thread !!

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  9. #9
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Not to rain on the parade Kodiak but have ya taken the time to wonder why you don't see anyone else doing it?
    8-12 miles offshore (and far less really) can get you in a world of hurt. Just because you can do it, should you? Have you fallen in the water here?
    I'm thinking you've never been scared spitless by the ocean? I can totally see using that kind of boat in conditions they were designed for; the flats, sheltered bays and in the "smaller" water you mentioned. A dozen miles offshore in unprotected waters is not small, especially in water that can kill ya in minutes.
    I think bare minimum here in Alaska for ocean fishing skiff would be a 18' Klamath, they have a high bow that will handle steeper chop and I'd think you could still flyfish out of it.
    Not tryin to be hard but it's tragic when bad stuff happens to folks on the water, even in way more capable boats than that ranger and closer or shore.
    In the CG we train every fall or winter, physically "in" the water and yes, I've been scared spitless in the ocean. And I've seen it kill people in front of me, and I've hoisted people out of it...so my respect for the ocean and what it can do is second to none. I'm not trying to be a hardass here and I'm much safer and well-equipped than many of my friends who have larger boats, but who barely have a fire extinguisher and no VHF, and nav off the same GPS they also use in their truck. Who's safer and respects the ocean more? I'm just curious if anyone else runs a boat like I do. And it's obvious they don't..which is what I figured, but why I asked.

    And I say a dozen miles...that's just a rough figure. I've not charted my distances, but I've done some 45 minute, to hour runs to get where I want to go on good days. But most of my fishing is within a few miles of something dry.

    I know why guys don't do it...you catch fewer fish! Casting (fly) vs trolling or soaking on the bottom...there's no comparison in success rates...I don't fish to fill my freezer (though I do keep a lot of it), I fish for fun. If I wanted jammed freezers, I'd gill net and troll with my wife and six friends every trip. And a lot of guys don't do it because, like I say, I'm a niche boater/fisherman. I don't use my boat for hunting (though I do hunt), or weekend trips like a lot of people do. I use my boat for one sole purpose, and that's limiting. But that same boat allows me to fish as I do.

    And speaking of the boat itself...it's not a flats boat or bass boat. A flats boat and a bay boat are different animals. It's like comparing a jon boat to a Lund. I have a heavy boat with a deep V that does well in chop, with a dry ride. It's not meant for 10'ers, but it'll handle a small craft advisory quite comfortably if I find myself in one. Guys run these in other parts of the country in open water quite extensively...just not here.

    Like I said, just curious. I'm not trying to get anyone to sell their boats or come fishing with me...I've seen a couple Whalers around and wondered if many guys here are "in the same boat" so to speak. Answer appears no....so I'll just head back to my little glass boat and try to avoid falling in.

  10. #10
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    Whats a Bristol Bay gillnetter got to do with a bass/flats boat ?? besides having the same 1st letter ??? I think you posted in the wrong thread !!
    Oops, but I thought that's what he was talking about when he asked about "bay boats".
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  11. #11
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    Oops, but I thought that's what he was talking about when he asked about "bay boats".
    LOL. A bay boat is a center console with a lower bow and typically no bow rail so you can fish a trolling motor and cast off the front.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kodiakfly View Post
    LOL. A bay boat is a center console with a lower bow and typically no bow rail so you can fish a trolling motor and cast off the front.
    Yes, lol...and sorry to sidetrack your thread, kodiakfly. I've always referred to BB-style sternpickers as "bay boats" so I jumped ahead of you...and it seemed more likely, in my mind, to see those around Kodiak as you mentioned.

    About Rangers and the like...they're very well designed and made boats. I've fished with my grandfather on his down in FL (on lakes only and his has a lower seated, side console)...and they seem to handle moderate chop well. Never been in swells w/ one...not sure I'd want to be. They're fast enough that you can get back in quickly if you closely watch the weather, stay close to port or sheltered waters should conditions change. I believe they have a lot of built-in floatation, but my biggest concern with a boat like that would be taking a wave over the stern in following seas. If you're heading into moderately rough seas, you're not likely to overload the bow of a boat like that with too much weight and you can always trim the engine to keep the bow up.

    Bigjim mentioned an 18' Klamath...a boat I've had in the past (Open model), as well as a 20' Bayrunner (Klamath now owns Bayrunner, I think) and they're both great starter boats for open saltwater fishing (though they still have their limits). Aluminum, so you can go to the beach...and with have high sides, bow and transom (or at least with a splash well), handling moderately rough water well if they need to (though they're not something I'd take out intentionally into rough water). They also lend themselves to fly fishing (though not as well as the low rangers)

    The little taste I've had of Kodiak fishing has me jealous of anyone down there with a boat of their own. If you're still paying on that boat and plan to stick around Kodiak for a while, I'd think about switching things up and put your money toward something perhaps better suited (although that's not the best place to sell a boat like that)...but if you own it and you know your limitations (sounds like you do), then have at it. Be safe, be prepared and have fun!
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  13. #13
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    Yes, lol...and sorry to sidetrack your thread, kodiakfly. I've always referred to BB-style sternpickers as "bay boats" so I jumped ahead of you...and it seemed more likely, in my mind, to see those around Kodiak as you mentioned.

    About Rangers and the like...they're very well designed and made boats. I've fished with my grandfather on his down in FL (on lakes only and his has a lower seated, side console)...and they seem to handle moderate chop well. Never been in swells w/ one...not sure I'd want to be. They're fast enough that you can get back in quickly if you closely watch the weather, stay close to port or sheltered waters should conditions change. I believe they have a lot of built-in floatation, but my biggest concern with a boat like that would be taking a wave over the stern in following seas. If you're heading into moderately rough seas, you're not likely to overload the bow of a boat like that with too much weight and you can always trim the engine to keep the bow up....



    ...The little taste I've had of Kodiak fishing has me jealous of anyone down there with a boat of their own. If you're still paying on that boat and plan to stick around Kodiak for a while, I'd think about switching things up and put your money toward something perhaps better suited (although that's not the best place to sell a boat like that)...but if you own it and you know your limitations (sounds like you do), then have at it. Be safe, be prepared and have fun!
    Ha, yeah I can see that being an easy misunderstanding.

    But yes, Rangers are top notch boats in construction and fit and finish. They are known as bass boats, but in reality they do more than that, and that's what I have. I have what is known (in the freshwater community) as a multi-species hull. It's not a bass hull. A bass hull is low, flat and little V to it...they're designed for speed on relatively flat water. A multi species hull is designed for walleye, muskie, etc fished on larger water and trolling big water in the Great Lakes. So yeah, it's got speed but it has the hull and bow depth to get up on top of 2' solid chop and go. In fact, that's where it's the fastest. The hull is deep enough that on flat conditions it's got so much wetted hull it'll slow the boat down. Get a directional chop going and get on top of it trimmed out and the boat will cruise at 45 mph.

    As far as trading up, this reason is specifically why I bought this boat...I can fish it here, in Michigan, Florida, Washington....pretty much anywhere the CG could send me...I've got a bow I can 1) use there, 2) tow there myself, and 3) most importantly, is dedicated to my style of fishing. I plan to have this boat in 20 years.

    I think a lot of people would be surprised at how well a hull like this works in the water here. In fact, if anyone is on Kodiak and wants a ride, look me up.

    Here's a pic of it out of the water. It's an old pic, before I repowered but you can see how deep the boat is and how different it is from a flats or bass boat. LOL, it's like an ice berg...most of it is below the surface.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Kodiakfly, correct me if I'm wrong but it looks like your captain position right behind the console is the only low point and that the rest of the deck (fore and aft) is almost at gunwale level and all dry compartments. If so, I'm guess that you can take on some spash without much concern of swamping since that thing probably floats like a cork. Also, given your profession, I imagine your safety protocol and awareness is second none. It looks like a good setup and what you use it for sounds like a lot of fun. Wish I was close to Kodiak, I'd give you a ring...

    Scott

  15. #15
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fin Chaser View Post
    Kodiakfly, correct me if I'm wrong but it looks like your captain position right behind the console is the only low point and that the rest of the deck (fore and aft) is almost at gunwale level and all dry compartments. If so, I'm guess that you can take on some spash without much concern of swamping since that thing probably floats like a cork. Also, given your profession, I imagine your safety protocol and awareness is second none. It looks like a good setup and what you use it for sounds like a lot of fun. Wish I was close to Kodiak, I'd give you a ring...

    Scott
    You are absolutely correct! The boat does float like a cork. The bow is chined pretty aggressively so if it's coming into a big wave you can hear it when the wave gets up to the top of the chine at the rub rail, slaps the boat and pushes the bow up. You'll get splash over the front occasionally, but to actually take water over the bow (or stern, or side) is extremely rare. It also has a self-bailing cockpit so it empties itself quickly.

    If I'm ever back in Port Angeles, we can take it out.

  16. #16

    Default

    Sounds like you got your ducks in a row Kodiak; good luck and keep posting pics!
    Check out Quickwater Adventure water taxi/transport services: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quick...37553606260978

  17. #17
    Member tzieli22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Eagle River AK
    Posts
    589

    Default

    Kodiak, way back when I lived in Oklahoma and Colorado, I owned a 24' Polar bay boat. I think it was actually just under 24'. But when I explained the hull design and purpose for it I would tell people it's basically a bass boat on steroids. I ran it with a 225 Merc. Loved the boat and always thought I'd bring it up here. But then I figured the resale on it would be terrible. They are a great boat, and fast, but I decided to leave it in the Midwest. I think if your planning to keep it for a long time and you only fly fish, you'll have fun. But it's basically only a saltwater boat, but it sounds like that's all you'll be using it for anyway.

    You sound like you have your act together so what the heck, give it hell and be safe. But 8-12 miles isn't much in Seward or Whittier. You would think it would be but for Seward, to stay in that close, you only be fishing the later part of summer. But on a good day, you'll make it to pony cove in about 20 minutes. But like others say (and you) all heck can break loose pretty quick and you'll need to get out of dodge quickly.

    Be safe regardless.
    Tony

  18. #18
    Member NeverLand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Boat and Condo are in Seward, but I live in Centreville, VA most of the year
    Posts
    216

    Default

    I think your Ranger would be a great boat for fishing Prince William sound.

  19. #19
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    Kodiak,

    Thanks for posting. I have seen you on here, but it never really registered what your boat was until now. It seems like it would work well. Nothing wrong with having something different. There is even a guy on here that promotes those 'downeast' boats like you see on the east coast!
    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  20. #20
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Thanks. It works well for what I want to do and it is pretty narrow in it's application. And while I do hunt, I just sacrifice "huntability" for "castability."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •